guggenheim museum

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Mapplethorpe, Warhol, and More Art This Week

“Andy Warhol, Self Portrait, 1986” Image credit: Courtesy Andy Warhol Foundation for Visual Arts/ Artists Rights Society (ARS)

Andy Warhol: By Hand, Drawings 1950s-1980s
Opening Tuesday, January 22 at New York Academy of Art, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through March 10.

Most people know Andy Warhol by his colorful printed pop art creations, films, and tendency to bring together some of the city’s most intriguing artists, writers, socialites, and drag performers. Or perhaps his associations with The Velvet Underground or Interview magazine come to mind. But Warhol also made drawings—he started out as a commercial illustrator—and you can see a selection of them created over the course of 30 years in a new exhibition at the New York Academy of Art. Rather than the bold shades of Warhol works like the iconic painting Campbell’s Soup Cans, these drawings are more minimal, often featuring nothing more than a pencil and paper. If you’ve already seen the sprawling Whitney retrospective, here’s a chance to see the artist in a new light. Keep Reading »

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Film: ‘The Cremaster Cycle’

Artist Matthew Barney spent eight years completing a five-part film series that runs over nine hours – The Cremaster Cycle, a reference to a muscle peculiar to the male anatomy that lives in some body thing known colloquially as the tunic– and now you can spend either minutes or the full nine yard-hours soaking it all up. Of the nine films, the first is regarded as the most “ascended” (get it? because the cremaster muscle pulls the testis in and out of the body?) and the final the most “descended” (in other words: dangled). Most of the cycle is focused on subjects that can be as yawn as male sexuality and man’s primitive nature, but some moments are as twisted as Richard D. James’ smile while others are as aesthetically pleasing and dare we say beautiful as a Brian Eno ditty. While some critics have panned the film set for being a paean to Mr. Barney’s ego, others have found it utterly irresistible.

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Film: ‘The Cremaster Cycle’

Artist Matthew Barney spent eight years completing a five-part film series that runs over nine hours – The Cremaster Cycle, a reference to a muscle peculiar to the male anatomy that lives in some body thing known colloquially as the tunic– and now you can spend either minutes or the full nine yard-hours soaking it all up. Of the nine films, the first is regarded as the most “ascended” (get it? because the cremaster muscle pulls the testis in and out of the body?) and the final the most “descended” (in other words: dangled). Most of the cycle is focused on subjects that can be as yawn as male sexuality and man’s primitive nature, but some moments are as twisted as Richard D. James’ smile while others are as aesthetically pleasing and dare we say beautiful as a Brian Eno ditty. While some critics have panned the film set for being a paean to Mr. Barney’s ego, others have found it utterly irresistible.

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Film Right Now: Male Muscle Epics and Transmutation by Jazz

This week our film picks are all ones in which context weighs heavily on the experience. While two of these movies are rendered incredible beyond their usual bounds by some seriously insane soundtracks, whether it’s a live one or a rescued one, the remaining two would be nothing without considering seriously their place within the current state of things. None of the films would function properly on their own without their other pairing. Boom. If that all sounds vague, it is — but I’m taking this opportunity to practice my powers of divination so that when I’m reading my friends’ tarot cards later, they’ll look deep into my eyes and be all, ‘Holy shit.’ Here’s to hoping that’s your reaction, dear reader, when you obediently check out each and every one of these movies and decode for yourselves their star-crossed connectivity.

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