graphic novels

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In Williamsburg, a New Zine Destination Snuggles Up With a Comics Store

(Flyer via Quimby's /Facebook)

(Flyer via Quimby’s /Facebook)

When Quimby’s opened up a few weeks back just off the Metropolitan stop, Williamsburg gained another hip little bookstore in an area where it sometimes feels like culture is on the way out. Thankfully, Quimby’s is the real deal, even if it’s a revival of a Chicago institution first opened by Steven Svymbersky in the ’90s.

But wait a minute, isn’t there already a specialty book store on the block? Yeah, there most definitely is: Desert Island, probably the best comic bookstore in the city, and maybe one of the most glorious shops dedicated solely to graphic novels and arty comics.

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There Was Cosplay, Cat Comics, and a Gigantic Charlie Brown at MoCCA Fest

Charlie Brown

This past weekend, MoCCA (Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art) teamed up with the Society of Illustrators at the 69th Regiment Armory for the 12th annual MoCCA Fest — a convention with artist booths and panel discussions celebrating the work of both amateur and established comic artists alike.
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Forget Thor and Pick Over Some Highbrow Comics This Weekend

While theater-goers watch a comic book-based movie about a Norse god who smashes things with a hammer this weekend, a different kind of comic book will be celebrated in Williamsburg. Comic Arts Brooklyn is having its first festival Saturday at Mt. Carmel Church and The Knitting Factory, replacing the now defunct Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Festival.
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‘Bowery Boys’ Reimagines the Really Bad, Really Old Days of the Lower East Side

BOWERYBOYS pg 4Crooked political machines, race-tinged violence, rampant disease, and a gross disparity of wealth: just another day in Five Points in 1853. “Bowery Boys,” a new comic written by Marvel editor Cory Levine, inked by South Williamsburg resident Ian Bertram, and colored by Rodrigo Aviles, brings the dirtiest, bloodiest corner of 19th-century Manhattan back to life. The story follows a father and son through the Lower East Side as they brace for an impending labor strike, and is being released for free online in serial format at three pages a week. We caught up with author Cory Levine to talk about online publishing, “Gangs of New York,” and the ends of the subway lines.
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