East Village

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Bye Bye, Blarney Cove: An Irish Holdover Packs Up the Shillelagh

Bartender Lisa Ramsay (Photo: JP Grace)

Bartender Lisa Ramsay (Photo: JP Grace)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photos: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photo: Scott Lynch)

Blarney Cove (Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

Sometime around 1977, Father Time ducked into the Blarney Cove on East 14th Street and never bothered to start the clock back up when he left. A gnarled shillelagh, or “Irish whuppin’ stick,” hangs on the wall beneath the television, which is typically tuned to baseball or horse races. There’s a working payphone and a video poker game by the tables in the rear. A faint odor of stale beer floats around.

Sadly, there are just a scant few days left to grab a cheap domestic draft at this sliver of old New York. The Cove will close its doors for good at the end of this month. It’s “going the way of Mars Bar and CBGB,” says bartender Lisa Ramsay.
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Think Cronuts Are a Big Deal? Look at This Ice-Cream-Sundae Toast Castle

Behold: honey toast. (Photo: Anna Silman)

Behold: honey toast. (Photo: Anna Silman)

Parting of the honey toast. (Photo: Anna Silman)

Parting of the honey toast. (Photo: Anna Silman)

The breaking of the bread. (Photo: Anna Silman)

The breaking of the bread. (Photo: Anna Silman)

The autopsy shot. (Photo: Anna Silman)

The autopsy shot. (Photo: Anna Silman)

Just look at those toast cubes. (Photo: Anna Silman)

Just look at those toast cubes. (Photo: Anna Silman)

Et voila: toast points for all. (Photo: Anna Silman)

Et voila: toast points for all. (Photo: Anna Silman)

By now you know that cronuts, the biggest phenomenon in crossbreeding since ligers, have become a viral phenomenon to rival even our most venerated online institutions, like Ryan Gosling Vs. a Puppy, or Grumpy Cat.

As a fledgling web operation, Bedford + Bowery is in need of just such a morsel of clickbait, and since our “Game of Thrones” birthday cake doesn’t seem to have gone viral (yet!), we were more than a little excited to see that a new pastry shop had opened on St. Marks Place. Might the next cronut be right under our nose?
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Buttermilk Bros: Competition Is Very Friendly at These New Ice Cream Parlors

Mohan Kumar and David Yoo (Photo: Erica Martin)

Mohan Kumar and David Yoo (Photo: Erica Martin)

When David Yoo, a student at Parsons, and Mohan Kumar, a realtor and DJ, met at a party in the East Village in 2005, they had no idea that one of them would go on to own an ice cream parlor in the neighborhood while the other would open one in Williamsburg.
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Car Jumps Curb and Plows Through Bodega Flower Stand, Injuring Eight

The car spun to a stop. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

The car spun to a stop. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

A telephone booth. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

A telephone booth. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

More debris. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

More debris. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

A fire hydrant flew into Calliope. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

A fire hydrant flew into Calliope. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

A tree was uprooted. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

A tree was uprooted. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

A car hopped the curb in the East Village this morning, mowing down everything in its path and sending 8 people to the hospital, according to the fire department.

“It was a scene out of a movie,” said Rafael, a witness who didn’t want his last name used.
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The Village Voice Is Leaving the Village… and Occupying Wall Street

Will the Voice take its letters to 80 Maiden Lane? (Photo: Phillip Pantuso)

Will 80 Maiden Lane soon look like this? (Photo: Phillip Pantuso)

In a move fittingly symbolic for a paper whose corporate overlords flew in to lay off some of its most venerated, tenured writers, the Village Voice is moving out of the Village — where it’s been, of course, since 1955 — to an office tower in the Financial District. The move is scheduled for sometime in August.

The new offices are located on the twenty-first floor of an office building at 80 Maiden Lane. Also in the building are the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, the New York offices of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, and the Department of Investigation for the City of New York. According to a realtor at Winick Realty Group, the sandwich chain Jersey Mike’s will be opening its first Manhattan location in the building’s ground-floor retail space over the summer.
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Reel Psyched: Our Northside and L.E.S* Film Festival Picks

Introducing “Reel Psyched,” wherein we tell you what we’re really excited to see in the theaters this week.
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With the Lower East Side Film Festival in full swing in Manhattan and the Northside Festival’s film program popping off tonight in Brooklyn, it’s a good time to be a film buff.

At the L.E.S* Film Festival, which kicked off Thursday and continues through the weekend, offerings from up-and-coming directors are judged by a panel of guests including celebrities like Judah Friedlander (“30 Rock”) and Dan Janvey (“Beasts of the Southern Wild”). The audience favorite gets a $2,000 check from Vimeo (ahem, Bedford + Bowery’s video player of choice).
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Hi-Collar Opens Tomorrow With the Blingiest Bathroom Ever

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hi-collar-8

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hi-collar-7

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hi-collar-4

Pour-over coffee, anyone?

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hi-collar

Hi Collar's bathroom door. (Photo: Natalie Rinn)

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hi-collar-5

Bon Yagi isn’t Osaka’s latest Bon Jovi cover band. He’s the “mayor of Japantown” who quietly owns, oh, pretty much every Japanese joint in the East Village: Robataya, Decibel, the list goes on.

After a quiet test run last week, he’ll open Hi-Collar tomorrow in the old Rai Rai Ken space (another Yagi venture, now relocated two doors down). The bar-cafe is a slim portal to Japan’s jazz, or “Taisho,” era, when western fashion and food first made inroads – up to a point.
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Members of Hold Steady, Spoon Bring Minneapolis to Manhattan Avenue

Bobby Drake in Lake Street's bathroom. (Photo: Jesse Sposato)

Bobby Drake in Lake Street’s bathroom. (Photo: Jesse Sposato)

What do a bunch of band dudes from the Midwest, who now live in Greenpoint, do when not making music together? Easy: they open a bar. Bobby Drake (The Hold Steady, w/o.), Frank Bevan (w/o.), Rob Pope (Spoon), Eric Odness (The Wanted, Primitive Weapons) named Lake Street after a major thoroughfare in Minneapolis, and they want it to be reminiscent of the bars they used to hang out at back home – “kind of old-man divey but cool bars, you know, where they could be sketchy, but not really,” Drake told Bedford + Bowery during a chat at the nearly finished space at 706 Manhattan Avenue, near Norman.
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Nightclubbing | Strange Party, 1980

Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong are sifting through their voluminous archive of punk-era concert footage as it’s digitized for the Downtown Collection at N.Y.U.’s Fales Library.

Described by the Soho Weekly News as “New York’s best party band,” Strange Party was a witty, stylish group serving up a fizzy cocktail of performance art with a dash of Latin-infused new wave. They were a huge outfit with six backup musicians and four vocalists upfront. And what vocalists! Led by downtown art star Joey Arias, the quartet was rounded out by Tony Frere, Paige Wood, and Janus Budde. They were eccentric and compelling — their guitarist George Elliot once described the band as “a little like heavy metal Ricky Ricardo.” Joey suggested they were just trying to turn art into fun.
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Nightclubbing | Student Teachers, 1979

Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong continue sorting through their archives of punk-era concert footage as it’s digitized for the Downtown Collection at N.Y.U.’s Fales Library.

(Photo: Steve Lombardi)

It’s that time of year again: Spring break! While college students are streaming like lemmings to the usual spots — Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean — there’s been an uptick of revelers heading for New York this year. You can see them — earbuds in, texting and stumbling around the Lower East Side and Williamsburg, updating their absent pals. We hope they’re enjoying themselves.
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Nightclubbing | Richard Hell and The Voidoids, 1979

Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong continue sorting through their archives of punk-era concert footage as it’s digitized for the Downtown Collection at N.Y.U.’s Fales Library

(Photo: Nicole Batchelor Regne)

Well, it is officially Richard Hell month. His newly published book, “I Dreamed I Was A Very Clean Tramp,” has enjoyed a glowing review in The New York Times. There has been a flurry of personal appearances in bookstores and a string of interviews in print outlets and on the radio.

It has probably reminded this self-deprecating and essentially very private man why he dropped from the public eye to begin with. The tension between his introversion and the will to perform has always been Hell’s biggest conundrum. And what better way to help relive that dichotomy than a book tour? Maybe it’s a form of therapy. We have the feeling he would rather chew glass.
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Nightclubbing | Lounge Lizards, 1979

Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong continue sorting through their archives of punk-era concert footage as it’s digitized for the Downtown Collection at N.Y.U.’s Fales Library.

Lounge Lizards (Photo: Pat Ivers)

We finally shot the Lounge Lizards at CBGBs in the spring of 1979, just a few months before we bought our first color camera. Good thing, too. They just looked better in black and white.

Some called what they played fake jazz but we loved their sinuous stew of no wave, be-bop and cinematic soundscape that Robert Palmer of The New York Times famously described as “somewhere west of Charles Mingus and east of Bernard Hermann.”
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