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New Exhibitions: One Artist In Two Galleries, Beautiful Soup, Native Transformers

(image via Disclaimer Gallery / Facebook)

First, Play / Second Date
Opening Wednesday, November 8 and Thursday, November 9 at Disclaimer Gallery and Field Projects, 6 pm to 9 pm and 6 pm to 8 pm.

It’s common to see many artists showing work in one gallery show, but less so to see a singular artist (who isn’t a long-deceased master or buzzy household name) exhibiting at multiple galleries in the same city at the same time. Though this may be rare, queer artist Loren Britton is far from ordinary. Both exhibitions explore the confines and freedoms of bodies and language, specifically in regards to the queer and gender non-conforming experience.

At Chelsea’s Field Projects, their charming but rough paper pulp wall reliefs reside. Over at Bushwick’s Disclaimer Gallery, a sandbox installation rife with pastel, pulp, and radical politics makes its home. At the former, it’s recommended attendees “stay clean”; at the latter, “getting dirty is encouraged.” Rounding out the artist’s presence is a coloring book collaboration with artist/designer Laura Coombs; people are encouraged to fill in the book on their time between exhibitions. Keep Reading »

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Art This Week: Lasers And Dust, Queer Art Auction, Bodies Reimagined

Particulates
Opening Tuesday, October 17 at Dia:Chelsea. On view through June 2.

The space at Dia:Chelsea is big and expansive, as it used to belong to the Alamo Marble Company. This makes it a particularly good fit for Rita McBride’s Particulates, a light sculpture installation consisting of sixteen lasers, water molecules, “surfactant compounds,” and appropriately, some marble dust. The result of this interesting collection of materials is a recreation of what seems to be the vast expanse of outer space mixed with a neon sci-fi world of the future, which should be good news to the people who have always wanted to feel enveloped in the galactic void but do not have the means to actually get up there. For those who cannot make it to the exhibit in-person, there is also a livestream of it. Keep Reading »

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Two Exhibitions Illuminate Queer NYC Subculture During the AIDS Epidemic

Image: © Estate of David Wojnarowicz, Democracy, 1990, Black-and-white silkscreen print, Courtesy of ClampArt, New York City

A black-and-white illustration by David Wojnarowicz, on view last week at Chelsea gallery ClampArt, shows a grim reaper descending with a large scythe. The reaper claims to be “Democracy At Work,” but freely slices through individuals and activists voicing concerns like “No healthcare,” “Killer cops,” “Corrupt politicians,” and “Unemployment.” Though the piece was created in 1990, this so-called democracy keeps on wounding today.

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Art This Week: Miyazaki Tribute, 1,000 Pigeons, And More

Photo: Siebren Versteeg, Daily Times, 2012, courtesy of the artist (via BAM)

2017 Next Wave Art
Opened Monday, September 25 at BAM, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through December 22.

If you are involved in media or even know someone involved in media, you have probably heard frequent mentions of the phrase “pivot to video.” This typically means deciding your digital media company is going to focus on making videos instead of producing written editorial content, and frequently means writers getting fired. Many argue that this new focus on short-form video content that’s prone to autoplaying all over Facebook is happening because it’s an easier way for advertisers to make money in an unstable industry. It could also signal a change in how people want to consume content. Keep Reading »

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Performance Picks: Stonewall Recollections, Radical Burlesque, Renewable Energy

WEDNESDAY

(image courtesy of Alton PR)

Street Theater
September 20-October 4 at The Eagle Bar, 7 pm: $25

The “father of modern queer theater” is back, and fittingly doing a show inside a gay leather bar in Manhattan. Yes, the late playwright and Stonewall Uprising participant Doric Wilson, who recently received a lifetime achievement award for his contributions to gay theater, is bringing his satirical Stonewall play Street Theater to Chelsea’s The Eagle.

Street Theater, which won an Innovative Theater award for a recent prior revival, was written in part to chronicle the events and people Wilson experienced personally at Stonewall in 1969. It’s produced by The Other Side of Silence (TSOS), one of the city’s first LGBT-centric theater companies, initially co-founded by Wilson and “resurrected” in 2002 by Wilson, Street Theater‘s director Mark Finley, and Barry Childs. Plus, after the show tonight, it’s “jockstrap night” at the bar. Keep Reading »

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Italian Anti-Capitalists, Bobby Cannavale at an Opening, and More Art This Week

Orchestra di stracci – vetro diviso (Rag Orchestra – Divided Glass) — Michelangelo Pistoletto, 1968
Rags, bricks, fabric, glass, kettles, steam, hot plates
2 glass panels, each: 0.4 x 130 x 90 cm / 1/8 x 51 1/8 x 35 3/8 in
Installation: 50 x 320 x 270 cm / 19 5/8 x 126 x 106 1/4 in (approx.)

Arte Povera
Opening Tuesday, September 12 at Hauser & Wirth 22nd Street, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through October 28.

When you think about Italian art, the Renaissance probably is the first thing to come to mind. However, as many of us have come to know far too late in life, what you were taught in your history classes is far from the whole picture. In this case, Italy is and has been home to a wide variety of artistic movements, and not all of them involved painting elaborate portraits for wealthy patrons. Keep Reading »

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Intergalactic Utopias, Suburban Kitsch, and More Art This Week

(image via Max Rosen / Facebook)

Omg Random
Opening Tuesday, September 5 at Benson’s NYC, 7 pm. On view through September 19.

Some art shows are tightly curated, conceptually driven projects that claim to elegantly tackle a Big Theme. Others are just selections of nice-looking stuff. Both types of curation are valid, but sometimes you want to give your lil’ old brain a break and just look at some fun, colorful works of art. Luckily, it appears that the aptly-titled Omg Random, opening tonight in the Lower East Side, will deliver all this and a bag of chips. But probably a bag of chips in painting form.

The show consists of work by Mary Houlihan, Max Rosen, and Rosie Morales. They will be showing paintings, mixed media works, collages, and more. Some of you may know Mary as a comedian, but she also makes very fun paintings. I once commissioned her to make a custom dog painting that really turned out great. I have not commissioned dog paintings from the other artists, but they seem top-notch as well. And if you like what you see, prints will be available for sale at the opening.

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Tribeca Launches a TV Festival With Louis C.K., Amy Sedaris and a Will & Grace Reunion

The people who used to brag about not owning a TV set are the same ones who now complain that there are too many shows– or so it was observed on a recent episode of Difficult People. Obviously, orange is the new black and the small screen is the new big screen, but up until a few years ago, New York City didn’t have a festival dedicated to what used to be called the idiot box. That changed in 2013, when we finally got a version of Los Angeles’s PaleyFest. That returns next month with some free screenings of shows like The Mindy Project and Fuller House. And now the folks behind the Tribeca Film Festival have announced a Tribeca TV Festival, also coming next month.

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A Sign of The Times, Russian Prison Tattoos, and More Art Shows

Rirkrit Tiravanija
untitled 2017 (tomorrow is the question, january 21, 2017), 2017
Acrylic and newspaper on linen
89 1/4 x 73 1/4 inches
Courtesy Rirkrit Tiravanija and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York/Rome
(c) Rirkrit Tiravanija

The Times
Opening Thursday, June 1 at The Flag Art Foundation. On view through August 11.

Hate it or love it, one newspaper that has rocketed even more to the forefront of the public eye in the past year is the Times. From the president’s dismissal of it as failing to its recent scoop battle with The Washington Post and even today’s announcement that it has eliminated its public editor position in favor of opening more of their articles’ comment sections, there is much to talk about.

This art exhibition goes even further than the paper’s recent goings-on, asking over 80 artists to use current and archival issues of the physical newspaper as a jumping-off point to create works of their own. Some imagine what the headlines would be in 2020, some insert themselves into the news, and others take a second look at press coverage of major historical and sociopolitical events. If the news wasn’t already on your mind constantly, this show could do the trick. Keep Reading »

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Smorgasburg Is Opening a Garden Restaurant at The High Line Hotel

(Photo: High Line Hotel’s Facebook page.)

The folks behind Smorgasburg, Berg’n and Brooklyn Flea are opening a “garden restaurant” at the High Line Hotel, in Chelsea. 180 Tenth was set to unveil its menu to friends and family this evening, but the private preview has been canceled due to the rain.

According to an invite, those lucky enough to have landed on the guest list to tomorrow’s preview will be treated to some “delicious, fresh, simple” food courtesy of head chef Aaron Taber, who has previously worked at Grindhaus and June Wine Bar. Cocktails, natural wine and frozen drinks will be served by Berg’n general manager Jen Watson, who will be the director of food and drink at 180 Tenth.

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Sebastian Junger’s Syria Doc, Hell on Earth, Tackles ‘The Greatest Tragedy of Our Generation’

After the premiere of Hell on Earth at the Tribeca Film Festival, an audience member asked filmmakers Sebastian Junger and Nick Quested why they had chosen The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS, as the subtitle has it, as the topic of their documentary.

“It’s the greatest tragedy of our generation and we had to address it,” Quested told a crowd Wednesday at Cinépolis Chelsea.

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Artists & Fleas Brings Williamsburg to Soho With a New Market

After a decade and a half as a staple of the Williamsburg flea market scene, Artists & Fleas is opening its fourth location, smack dab in the middle of Soho, on the corner of Prince and Broadway. Look out, Prada.

Founded by Brooklyn-based Amy Abrams and Ronen Glimer in 2003, A&F allows independent artists and designers to sell their wares (or wears. . .get it?), resulting in a hodge podge of hip stuff: vintage clothing, jewelry, leather products, art items, handbags, food, and, of course, beard oil. 

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