We give fashionable locals a place to go and they get All Dressed Up.

Benjamin surveys his options at Cadet. (All photos: Lauren Smith)

Benjamin surveys his options at Cadet. (All photos: Lauren Smith)

 “I'm very big on patterns,

“I'm very big on patterns," says Benjamin, in his paisley blazer.

“I have a love-hate relationship with denim. Meaning I actually hate it. But I want to love it,” he says, examining a pair of jeans inspired by '50s aviator pants (according to Brad), with a back buckle and metal detailing.

“I have a love-hate relationship with denim. Meaning I actually hate it. But I want to love it,” he says, examining a pair of jeans inspired by '50s aviator pants (according to Brad), with a back buckle and metal detailing.

He explores further and finds another pair in a similar style, but made from navy blue herringbone.

He explores further and finds another pair in a similar style, but made from navy blue herringbone.

"Oh, I like these," he says. "These satisfy my need for tweed."

 “They’re toasty,

“They’re toasty," he says, after trying on the pants. "Good for an airplane. I travel a lot, so I need something like this. I actually prefer being cold, but I can appreciate a toasty pant.”

“There’s some cool detailing, but it’s still simple. I love the asymmetrical codpiece!” he says, admiring how the front zipper of the pants veers off to the right.

“There’s some cool detailing, but it’s still simple. I love the asymmetrical codpiece!” he says, admiring how the front zipper of the pants veers off to the right.

 “I’d probably wear them with boots,

“I’d probably wear them with boots," he says. "Though these sneakers don’t look bad. These are my first pair of sneakers, you know!”

His brother worked for Nike, he says, and bought him the kicks to force him toward "expanding his options" beyond dress shoes.

Despite his love for patterns, Benjamin picks up a simple navy crew-neck sweatshirt to complete the outfit.

Despite his love for patterns, Benjamin picks up a simple navy crew-neck sweatshirt to complete the outfit.

"I try not to be too traditional," he says. "In Paris [last Fashion Week] I was running around in a sweatshirt and a lot of jewelry."

After worriedly asking whether or not a tee with a single pocket and tiny navy stripes was from last season “because it’s short-sleeve,” Benjamin chose to wear it underneath his sweatshirt, peeking out from the collar just a teeny bit.

After worriedly asking whether or not a tee with a single pocket and tiny navy stripes was from last season “because it’s short-sleeve,” Benjamin chose to wear it underneath his sweatshirt, peeking out from the collar just a teeny bit.

We learned from Benjamin, after six pronunciation attempts and a spelling lesson, that the fashion-conscious name for horizontal stripes on a shirt is mariniere. It is derived from the French word for “sailor” because 1850s French seamen wore them to stick out more visibly against the waves.  (Here are Benjamin's shirt and some sailors in mariniere, via Cadet and Wikipedia.)

We learned from Benjamin, after six pronunciation attempts and a spelling lesson, that the fashion-conscious name for horizontal stripes on a shirt is mariniere. It is derived from the French word for “sailor” because 1850s French seamen wore them to stick out more visibly against the waves. (Here are Benjamin's shirt and some sailors in mariniere, via Cadet and Wikipedia.)

Fun fact: The world’s first mariniere shirt design had exactly 21 stripes, one for each of Napoleon’s victories.

Benjamin's final outfit.

Benjamin's final outfit. "It's easy," he says. "Very grab-and-go. I'd probably pair it with a necklace."

When we met up with Benjamin-Emile Le Hay at the Williamsburg branch of Cadet, he was wearing a royal-blue blazer with a pattern of black paisley, a muted striped button-down, and a pair of very significant sneakers. We were lucky enough to catch Benjamin, who works at the New York Observer as a fashion editor and is a contributing columnist at Shindigger (meaning he gets paid to go to parties full of fancy, crazy people), the day before New York Fashion Week began. He’s attending Milan Fashion Week at the moment, tweeting about Ferragamo’s use of python.
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