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Italian Anti-Capitalists, Bobby Cannavale at an Opening, and More Art This Week

Orchestra di stracci – vetro diviso (Rag Orchestra – Divided Glass) — Michelangelo Pistoletto, 1968
Rags, bricks, fabric, glass, kettles, steam, hot plates
2 glass panels, each: 0.4 x 130 x 90 cm / 1/8 x 51 1/8 x 35 3/8 in
Installation: 50 x 320 x 270 cm / 19 5/8 x 126 x 106 1/4 in (approx.)

Arte Povera
Opening Tuesday, September 12 at Hauser & Wirth 22nd Street, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through October 28.

When you think about Italian art, the Renaissance probably is the first thing to come to mind. However, as many of us have come to know far too late in life, what you were taught in your history classes is far from the whole picture. In this case, Italy is and has been home to a wide variety of artistic movements, and not all of them involved painting elaborate portraits for wealthy patrons. Keep Reading »

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Performance Picks: Cavemen Presentations, Bodily Explorations, Socialist Talents

WEDNESDAY

(image via The Creative Independent / Facebook)

What Is A Body?
Wednesday, August 30 at 58 Kent Street, 7 pm: FREE

What is a body? Well, that’s a good question. For one, it’s a sack of flesh with some organs in it. But it’s also so much more. This performance and panel discussion delves into the inherent relationship that live performance has with bodies. If you make something and perform it yourself, the way your body exists, moves, and functions affects how that performance happens. Additionally, the societal constructs regarding bodies and how they should act and appear will affect the audience’s perception of the performance. Is there a way to prevent or subvert this? Performers Erin Markey, Neil Goldberg, and Jonathan Gonzalez will all show you some of their work, and then discuss what you’ve seen and how it relates to the big wide world of bodies. Keep Reading »

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Performance Picks: Pizza N’ Jokes, Anime Burlesque, A ‘Folkloric Spectacle’

THURSDAY

(image via Tiny Hornets)

Tiny Hornets, Or, It Didn’t Have To Come To This
August 24-September 8 at 389 Melrose Street, 7:30 pm: $12

What is folklore? Who belongs to it, who disseminates it, and who decides what it looks like? That is what The Drunkard’s Wife, Craig Flanagin, and Normandy Sherwood are trying to figure out in their latest creation, Tiny Hornets, in which a guide introduces you to a slew of villagers and all their peculiarities. These villagers are all unique in their own ways, including one who may or may not be interested in the taste of flesh. And of course, folk isn’t folk without music and dancing, so there will be plenty of that too.

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Not A Real Body Farm, Sad & Asian Creations, and More Art Shows

(flyer via Paradice Palase)

Body Farm
Opening Thursday, August 24 at Paradice Palase, 4 pm to 9 pm. One night only.

Ok, to ease your nerves (or disappoint you), this isn’t an exhibition of an actual body farm. If you’re unfamiliar with the term, body farms are decomposition research facilities. So then, what is this Body Farm? It’s a one-night-only pop-up exhibition being put on by Paradice Palase, a Brooklyn space that “believes in a community-supported gallery model and getting artists paid for their efforts.” TBH, really all you have to say is that this is an organization that cares about paying artists and that would make their show worth going to. Plus, there seems to be a neon pineapple sign involved, which sounds fun. Keep Reading »

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Aesop Rock Returns to His Old Stomping Grounds For His Bushwick Civil-War Movie

Last month we shared a Q&A with the directors of Bushwick, about a Texas army invading the Brooklyn neighborhood. In honor of the movie’s release and his first time scoring a film, Aesop Rock is performing tomorrow night at Music Hall of Williamsburg. The hip-hop artist and producer– who was raised in Long Island, broke through in New York City, and recently moved to Oregon– has said he agreed to do the soundtrack in part because he “lived in Bushwick long ago.” Tickets to tomorrow’s show are $25 and Bushwick hits theaters and video on demand this Friday. Check out our Q&A with the film’s directors, Cary Murnion and Jon Milott, to find out why they set a civil war movie in the neighborhood, and what filming there was like. 

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Colors of Childhood, Black Natural Hair, and More Exhibitions This Week

Naomi Clark (image courtesy of Cooler Gallery)

Milk Curd and Cherry Pits: Color Stories by Naomi Clark
Opening Tuesday, August 8 at Cooler Gallery, 7 pm to 10 pm. On view through August 25.

Not everyone has a favorite color, but surely there is a shade that reminds you of a specific time, place, person, or feeling. For those with conditions like synesthesia, colors can take on an even more tangible role in memories and associations. To others, they can just look nice, without being imbued with any sort of deep meaning.

In Milk Curd and Cherry Pits, her exhibition at Cooler Gallery, painter and textile artist Naomi Clark connects color with her childhood. Even the title itself conjures a simpler, more rustic time, when everyday items like the pits within cherries were new and surprising. She’s particularly drawn to yellows and blues, creating simple shapes on small canvases. To Clark, these works are associated with relaxed, childlike creativity. To you, perhaps something else entirely.

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Take It From This Bushwick Peacock Owner, That Wasn’t a Live Peacock on the Subway

Ventiko feeding Dexter yogurt and blueberries in her Bushwick loft. (© Zito)

A photo of a peacock on the subway created a social media frenzy on Friday. People crowed not just about the peacock, but also the fellow passengers who seemed unfazed by the feathery giant. Only in New York City, New York City exclaimed.

We wondered whether the mystery bird was the one and only Dexter the Peacock, so we reached out to his owner, Ventiko. Turns out the subway peacock didn’t belong to the Bushwick-based conceptual photo and performance artist, but Ventiko had a theory: “By the way the human is holding a small stick with the bird perched on it, it must be stuffed.”

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Chelsea Manning’s DNA, Candy-Colored Churches, and More Art This Week

(image via Fridman Gallery / Facebook)

A Becoming Resemblance
Opening Wednesday, August 2 at Fridman Gallery, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through September 5.

It’s hard to ignore Chelsea Manning lately. And rightfully so: Against all odds, her newly liberated presence, both on Twitter and IRL, remains one of the most fiercely optimistic in a pool of (justifiably) jaded folk. Ironic memes have no match for colorful emojis, it seems. But this Wednesday, Manning can be found in an art gallery, and her presence manifests in more ways than just the literal.

A Becoming Resemblance is a collaborative venture between Manning and interdisciplinary artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg, using and exploring the technology of genomic identity construction. The show consists of 3D-printed portraits constructed in 2015 from pieces of DNA (hair, nail clippings) Chelsea sent her collaborator from prison. This gave the world a chance to once again put a human face to her identity, which had been shrouded by incarceration for years. The show will also include a graphic novel the duo made last year in collaboration with illustrator Shoili Kanungo depicting Chelsea’s sentence getting commuted by Obama and her being able to see her 3D portraits in person. What was initially drawn as hopeful fiction can now become reality.

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Performance Picks: A Trap Musical, Butoh in the Park, Steven Tyler’s iPad

WEDNESDAY

(flyer via Paperboy Prince / Facebook)

Trap Musical
Wednesday, July 26 at Bizarre Bushwick, 9 pm: $7-15 suggested donation

I have to be honest, I find this event extremely baffling. The poster has Pepe and Shia LaBeouf on it, neither of which are particularly beloved images lately, yet the show is subtitled “#TheyWillNotDivideUs.” Are the divisive villains in this story Pepe and Shia LaBeouf? There doesn’t seem to be much indication, but in any case the idea of a “full-length trap and R&B musical production” being performed in a Bushwick bar that specializes in the wild and weird seems like a good enough selling point. Helmed by Paperboy Prince of the Suburbs, the cast is massive and jam-packed with a bevy of local performance artists, musicians, dancers, rappers, and more.

If you’re itching to see what in tarnation this thing is but can’t attend tonight, the event indicates it is going to become a monthly affair on the fourth Wednesday of every month. It will become a late-night party after the performance concludes, where you can process what you just saw by dancing until the wee hours.

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Technicolor Blanket Forts and More Art To Soak Up This Week

(flyer via Point Green / Facebook)

Tümbiverse
Opening Thursday, July 27 at Point Green, 7 pm to 11 pm. On view through August 5.

Despite what you may think, “Tümbiverse” isn’t a weird German futuristic version of Tumblr. It refers to painter Michael Bianchino’s sweeping and immersive “technicolor portraits” that invite all types of self-expression. He won’t be the only one creating art, as Bianchino and co-curator Jasmine Williams have asked 20 innovative folk to do what they do alongside his vibrant mini-worlds. The result is expansive, featuring textiles, video art, sculpture, performance art, voguing, and even a living doll experience courtesy of Toshi Salvino.

On the last day of the exhibition, the band Confetti Armor will lead a hands-on workshop on “blanket forts as ritual practice,” which will surely justify any of the times your mom said you were wasting time making a blanket fort growing up. Uh, mom, I was doing important ritual work. And if you’re hungry for even more art in a Greenpoint photo studio, earlier in the week Point Green will also be showing How This Has To Be Told, a 35mm slideshow of photos by Martha Naranjo Sandoval that interrogates old photos and the power they have. Keep Reading »

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Bushwick Directors On What It’s Like to Bring Civil War to Brooklyn

Cary Murnion and Jon Milott have teamed up to direct Bushwick, an action movie about a Texas army that invades the Brooklyn neighborhood. Starring Brittany Snow and Dave Bautista, it was one of two Bushwick-set films that clocked some buzz at Sundance back in February (the other one, The Incredible Jessica James, will have a Rooftop Films screening on July 25, and will be streaming on Netflix July 28. With the trailer for Buswhick out earlier this week (it hits theaters Aug. 25), we caught up with the busy directors to talk about the film, politics and why Bushwick? Keep Reading »

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This Souped-Up Truck Serves Free Food With a Side of Social Services

Cooper Park residents Guillermo Nunez and Maria Albarado enjoying a free meal © Kasper van Laarhoven

A $340,000 “Angelmobile” has started cruising the streets of North Brooklyn, handing out free meals in Williamsburg, Greenpoint and Bushwick. The state-of-the-art food truck– funded in part by Norman Brodsky, the entrepreneur who drew ire from community activists when he held out on selling his valuable waterfront property for parkland— is more than just a mobile soup kitchen. Inside, it has an office space where a rotating array of neighborhood organizations can dole out social services.

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