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3 Readings and an Open Air Book Fair

WEDNESDAY

Huang, EddieEddie Huang presents Double Cup Love: On the Trail of Family, Food, and Broken Hearts in China 
June 1st at 7:30 p.m. at Berg’n Beer Hall, 899 Bergen Street, Sponsored by Greelight Books.
You probably know Eddie Huang as the creator of EV fave Baohaus– or maybe from his R-rated culinary travelogues on his Huang’s World show on Viceland or even for his first successful memoir Fresh off the Boat, about growing up Chinese in suburban Florida (but hopefully not the eponymous show based on it, which Huang says he doesn’t watch). Whatever he does, you know it’s gonna be juicy. Now everyone’s favorite no-holds-barred gourmand is out with Double Cup Love: On the Trail of Family, Food, and Broken Hearts in Chinaa funny and poignant memoir about his search for identity. This story meets Huang when his star is already rising as a restaurant entrepreneur and budding media personality with a steady all-American girlfriend. But something’s missing–and you can follow Huang to China to find out. He’ll be joined by Elena Bergeron, executive editor at SB Nation and Eddie’s co-host on the MSG podcast.

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4 Talks: The Rolling Stones, The Science of FB Likes, and Megg & Mogg in Amsterdam

10_Rich_Cohen_cover_low_resTUESDAY

Book Launch: Rich Cohen’s The Sun and the Moon and the Rolling Stones
May 10 at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, 126 Crosby Street
Rich Cohen seems to have his mind plugged into the tempos of the past–a co-creator of HBO’s Vinyl and a Vanity Fair contributor, his new book reconsiders the history and impact of one of the greatest bands to ever shake up the music scene. His telling of the ups and downs of the Rolling Stones benefits from his close relationship with the band since the 1990s. The story charts their course from their beginnings in 1961 to their golden run through the 70s, drawing readers into the defining moments that left a lasting imprint on music and our culture. No, the Rolling Stones themselves won’t be on hand at the launch–but luckily there will be music in the form of the dance band argonaut&wasp.

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Four Talks: Decolonial Love, Deathbeds of Famous Writers, and Election Fever

rob
TUESDAY

Rob Spillman’s All Tomorrow’s Parties Launch
March 29 at 7 p.m, at Housing Works Bookstore, 126 Crosby Street
Rob Spillman, editor of Tin House magazine, has written a memoir coming-of-age story about his rebellious pursuit of artistic authenticity. The son of two musicians born in divided Germany, Spillman spent his childhood in West Berlin’s artistic community. He moved around and eventually dipped into New York’s literary milieu in the ’80s, but after the wall came down, at age 25, he returned to East Berlin, searching for the bohemian lifestyle he’d always been inspired by. The book, filled with intimate and sometimes humorous personal stories, is also a spirited journey through Berlin’s shifting transformation in the midst of a cultural renaissance.

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Talks + Readings: The Dogist, Sarah Vowell, and Chip Kidd Meets Charlie Brown

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The Dogist
Tuesday, October 20 at 7 p.m. Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway (NoLIta).
The Dogist himself, Elias Weiss Friedman, will be talking with Stacie Grissom of the BarkPost newsletter about the release of The Dogist: Photographic Encounters with 1,000 Dogs. The event is being held in celebration of the book’s release and in recognition of October being Adopt a Shelter Dog Month, so the ASPCA will be there, too, with a few furry friends in need of a home. Strand asks that you please keep your own pooch at home, but BarkBox will be on hand with all the materials you need to make a pup-friendly doggie bag to take home, so you don’t have to feel too bad about Fido missing out. Brews will be on hand from Radiant Pig Craft Beers, so buy a copy of The Dogist or a $15 gift card for admission and stop by Strand for a doggone good time.

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Talks and Readings: Historic Greenpoint, Multiculti Confessions, and More

buildagirlTUESDAY

Almost Famous, except about a girl. And set in the ’90s. And British.
How to Build a Girl, described by the New York Times’ Dwight Garner as “a British version of ‘Almost Famous,’ delivered from a female perspective and set two decades later,” is celebrating its paperback release with a reading by author Caitlin Moran. She’s often compared to Tina Fey and Lena Dunham, “which is fair so far as it goes,” according to Garner, “though I’d add Amy Winehouse and the early Roseanne Barr to the mix.” Watch her read excerpts from her comic novel about a poor teen determined to reinvent herself as a rock critic in 1990s London.
Tuesday, July 7 at 7 p.m. Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway (East Village).

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Talks + Readings: Duff McKagan, Galway Kinnell, and a Living Female Rock Critic

battle linesMonday

History buffs, take note: Battle Lines is not your ordinary Civil War read. This books is a team effort by graphic novelist Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and award-winning historian Ari Kelman, and it’s sweeping, full-color panoramas combined with Kelman’s nuanced understand of the period provide a whole new perspective on the topic. The authors will talk about the book with acclaimed graphic novelist Josh Neufeld (A.D. New Orleans After the Deluge) accompanied by images from Battle Lines on Greenlight’s big screen.
Monday, May 11 at 7:30 p.m.  Greenlight Bookstore, 686 Fulton Street (Fort Greene). 

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Talks + Readings: Headscarves, Hymens, Spinsters and an Anti-Bridget Jones

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As we get ready to watch Kate Bolick read from Spinster, “a revelatory and slyly erudite look at the pleasures and possibilities of remaining single,” tonight at 20 Cooper Square (6-8 p.m.), here’s a selection of other feminist-esque literary happenings this week. There are talks from a social critic and women’s rights advocate, an outspoken actress/poet, the folks at The Feminist Press, and of course there’s a modern take on Jane Eyre. All that and more, straight ahead.

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