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Art that is ‘Vapid and Screaming,’ Philosophical Collage, a Solo Show Duo, and More

(flyer via Vapid and Screaming / Facebook)

(flyer via Vapid and Screaming / Facebook)

Vapid & Screaming
Opening Monday January 2, 6 pm to 9 pm at 208 Bowery. On view through January 4.

Nowadays, gallery space in Manhattan is pricey, yet art is still being created left and right. For those still clinging on to the last kernel of hope that there is hope for the island, well, there might be something there. At least, for pop-up shows.

Take 208 Bowery–a former restaurant supply shop-turned-pop-up hub which recently featured a Drake-themed event, among other art shows and will now be the site of Vapid and Screaming, a pop-up show of work by “emerging fag, femme, and queer artists.”

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This Art Show Wants Your Election Reactions, Regardless of How Rowdy

(flyer courtesy of Erin Davis and Max C. Lee)

(flyer courtesy of Erin Davis and Max C. Lee)

If your blood hasn’t stopped boiling since last Tuesday, a weekend art show could be a chance to find some semblance of catharsis. This Saturday, the fifth iteration of the RE: Art Show opens, once again taking over a portion of the old Pfizer Building at 630 Flushing in Bed-Stuy. Last month’s edition of the show featured the celebrated group exhibit Fatter IRLThis month’s Re:Re:Re:Re:Re: will take place in an area of the building that perhaps most reflects the state of affairs in this country, as it appears to be in shambles. A press release states the gallery area will be a “large, open, unfinished space with chipped paint, exposed wiring, and fire alarm components dangling from the ceiling.” May we try our best to hang on to the “unfinished” aspect of that to give us a kernel of hope to keep on going. Call your senators!

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A Bed-Stuy Biennial, Nina Simone Self-Defense, and Other Art Events This Week

Nkiruka J. Oparah, study n° 080415, 2015, digital collage (image via BRIC)

Nkiruka J. Oparah, study n° 080415, 2015, digital collage (image via BRIC)

BRIC Biennial: Volume II, Bed Stuy / Crown Heights
Opening Wednesday, November 9 at BRIC, 7 pm to 9 pm. On view through January 15. 

BRIC’s largest exhibition to date is centered at Downtown Brooklyn’s BRIC House but also taking place in portions of Crown Heights’s FiveMyles, the Brooklyn Public Library, and the Weeksville Heritage Center. The show’s sprawling spread reflects the artists represented in the show, as all 40 are local to Crown Heights and Bed Stuy. The theme for the exhibit is “Affective Bodies,” placing a focus on “bodily experience rather than on learned knowledge,” a somewhat subversive move in the world of art exhibits, as so many are grounded in theory, explained using highly academic terms, and/or featuring high-class educated folks. Each non-BRIC venue will showcase a different sort of work: Weeksville Heritage artists are focused on the “emotional resonance” people give urban spaces, the Brooklyn Public Library artists use preexisting documents as their source material to create new works, and FiveMyles will focus on performance art. Keep Reading »

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This Week’s Art: A Fish Market Repurposed and Many Types of ‘Graphic Art’

Mike Taylor (image via Idio Gallery)

Mike Taylor (image via Idio Gallery)

Mike Taylor: Condensed Flesh
Opening Thursday October 13 at Idio Gallery, 6 pm to 11 pm. On view through October 30.

East Williamsburg space Idio Gallery put out a call for crowdsourced financial support several months ago, which very well could have signaled that it was beginning to scale down. However, with a show at Bushwick Open Studios and another show opening shortly after, they don’t appear to be going anywhere. This one is a solo show, presenting works on paper and paintings by renowned graphic artist Mike Taylor, created between 2012 and now. Finished works won’t be the only thing on display in this show, as Idio’s downstairs basement space will be transformed into a showcase of the artist in-process, with drawings not yet done, prints, and “printmaking debris” on view as well. Taylor’s work is bold and bright, often utilizing neon colors and mixing abstract patterns with notes of realism and the human form filtered through the style of the illustrator and comic artist.

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Weekend Art Stops: Everyday Halloween, Crabapple Muses, and One Painting, Deconstructed

(image via Disclaimer Gallery)

(image via Disclaimer Gallery)

Everyday Things
Opening Friday September 9 at Disclaimer Gallery (inside the Silent Barn), 6 pm to 9 pm. On view through October 2.

Though artist Megan Tatem often works in illustration, creating works for magazines and doing graphic design over at Hearst Media, this “tongue-in-cheek” exhibition will showcase another side of her work: photography. The show provides commentary on imagery related to racial stereotypes, but wrapped up in a tight layer of sarcasm. This results in lighthearted visual observations on assumptions like “white people can’t dance” and who holds the highest proclivity for fried chicken, but also delves into darker, serious territory, also acknowledging how racial stereotypes like the assumption that people of color are dangerous or prone to crime can (and has) lead to unwarranted violence against them.

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Art Hearts: Beach Party in the City, Sunshine Ruins, and Bye Bye in Bed-Stuy

Peyton Freiman, "JFK was a Realist," 2015. Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Canvas, 6 x 3.5 inch. (image via Shin Gallery)

Peyton Freiman’s “JFK was a Realist,” 2015 (Image courtesy of Shin Gallery)

Long Gone and Missing
Opening Wednesday August 1, 7 pm to 9 pm at Shin Gallery. On view through September 10. 

Imagine a beach on the Lower East Side. Now imagine that beach stuffed inside an art gallery. Some might call it crazy, but this wacky dream will become reality at the opening of Peyton Freiman’s solo show, Long Gone and Missing. The Brooklyn-based artist (who also recently showed a piece in loft-gallery Club 157’s first group show) will transform Shin Gallery into a “veritable beach playground” filled with his colorful mixed media works on paper.

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Nacho Average Opening: Associated Gallery’s Pop-Up Show Was Cheesy in the Best Way

(photo: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

(photo: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

Walking into an art gallery opening, you aren’t normally greeted with the smell of sweat and ketchup while men in flannel stare at still-life paintings, holding a Big Mac in one hand and a Coors Light in the other. The burger was snatched from a towering shrinelike art piece and the ketchup was dripping steadily from a fountain. But this isn’t an ordinary show, and the folks behind it aren’t an ordinary gallery.

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Many Nudes, None By Dudes, at This Art Show Dedicated to the Female Gaze

Amanda Charchian "Ana in Costa Rica," 2012 at "In The Raw: The Female Gaze on The Nude" Exhibit, (Courtesy of Untitled Space Gallery, New York)

Amanda Charchian
“Ana in Costa Rica,” 2012 at “In The Raw: The Female Gaze on The Nude” Exhibit, (Courtesy of Untitled Space Gallery, New York)

Opening night for In the Raw: The Female Gaze on the Nude (on view now through May 21 at The Untitled Space) was predictably packed, and not just because it’s Frieze week and the gallery was giving out free booze. I’d like to think that people were there for the actual art exhibition, which was billed as an all-female, all-nude art show where 20 women artists, aged 21 to 60-something, from Russia, Chile, and beyond, “explore a perspective less chartered, that of a woman’s eye on another,” and in the process “challenge the status quo with a liberating and authentic beauty.” Or maybe they were there because Victoria de Lesseps (daughter of Real Housewives “star” Countess LuAnn de Lesseps) is also on the roster of participating artists. Who could tell?

Indira Cesarine, who curated the multimedia art show along with Coco Dolle of Milk and Night, told me that she felt the exhibition was a “timely” one. Dolle told Whitehot magazine that the work is “saleable.” They’re in no way wrong.

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Mastermind of Controversial ‘Bushwick 200’ Project Tries to ‘Heal the Gap’

Grattan St._096 Bushwick_ Rafael Fuchs_DSCF7140

“Grattan St.” June 11, 2006 by Rafael Fuchs (Image courtesy of Fuchs Projects)

Rafael Fuchs has lived in Bushwick for the last 11 years. For the first five, Fuchs worked as an independent artist and since 2012 he’s run Fuchs Projects, a gallery for showing work by himself and other artists (international and local) inside the BogArt, a building that on weekends is packed with streams of visitors headed to galleries with names like Soho20. An Israeli photographer who’s lived in New York since 1985, Fuchs arrived in Bushwick just prior to what he calls the “art explosion,” as just another newcomer looking for cheap rent. His neighborhood stomping grounds over the years have been mostly confined to the area around the Morgan stop. Beyond that zone of familiarity is what Fuchs described to me as “deep Bushwick.”

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Genesis Breyer P-Orridge Wants You to Try and Altar Everything

(Art Work by Genesis P-Orridge)

(Art Work by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge)

There might be no other artist breathing today who lives their art as deeply and consistently as Genesis Breyer P-Orridge. The renowned occultist and “wrecker of civilization” has repeatedly taken a spiky club to the larger culture, even to h/er own body, as a means of dismembering ingrained mores. S/he did this first as a founding member of Throbbing Gristle– a band whose embrace of bristling, harsh sounds and antagonistic politics sought to dishevel the status quo, and sparked the inception of industrial music– and subsequently with Psychic TV. With h/er new exhibition, Try to Altar Everything (opening March 11), P-Orridge will transform the Rubin Museum into a participatory “shamanic space,” inspired by h/er travels to the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal. “We’re developing this bouncing conversation between the mundane and the sacred,” Genesis explained. “Everything can be sacred, and if you start to look for the sacred, you will find it.”

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Art: First Show at Christopher Stout Gallery, Phoenix Lindsey-Hall’s “Shepard”

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Founder of the Bushwick Art Crit Group, Christopher Stout is now the head of his own gallery, which has its very first art opening with sculptor Phoenix Lindsey Hall’s solo exhibition, “Shepard.” The centerpiece of the show, a 14-foot replica of the fence Matthew Shepard was chained to while his assailants tortured him to death, is a stark confrontation with a symbol of hate and anti-gay violence. “It’s a very somber show,” Stout explained. “New York tends to show very serious work in the fall and it seems like a very important way but also a very different way to talk about some of the issues we’re interested in exploring.”

 

Read more about the gallery here.

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Step into a Pitch-Black Box For Some Truly Enlightening Art

Andrea Wolf, Unsolicited Memories, Archival Exercises N.5. 2015.

Andrea Wolf, Unsolicited Memories, Archival Exercises N.5. 2015.

We’re all familiar with the traditional “white box” art gallery— it’s bright, clean, sterile, artificial and unshadowed. Keeping this in mind, BFP Creative made a space that does the opposite–a black box, void of any light, designed to showcase the glowing works that inhabit it. Unlike most art, work by the eight artists in the show “Luminary,” opening tonight, thrive in the pure darkness.

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