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Olek Swaddled a Car in Yarn, and That Was Really Just the Beginning of Open Canvas

"Forgotten Barrier"

Olek's response to the prompt "Transform Today" was this crocheted mural, which read "All we need is love and money."

"Olek Bike"

Brooklyn-based street artist Olek displayed three pieces on North 6th, including her recognizable crocheted bike.

"Auto Install"

Maybe the most incredible piece of the Open Canvas event was Olek's completely crocheted van.

"Auto Install"

A view from the front.

Posters

Posters

Both sides of North 6th were plastered with posters from artists such as Justin Beal, Michael Zahn and tattoo artist JK5.

Posters

Posters

A finished section of posters on the south side of North 6th Street

"Magnus Salo (The Big Surge)"

Brooklyn-based multidisciplinary artist ROSTARR is known for his signature calligraphic lines, which he painted in acrylic above Music Hall of Williamsburg.

"Magnus Salo (The Big Surge)"

ROSTARR's mural was undoubtedly the highest public art piece of the Open Canvas Initiative.

"Consider Yourself Warned"

Craig Damrauer's work featured barely legible stenciled phrases warning viewers about fireworks, scams and other dangers, which he was covered with layers of paint.

Passersby

Passersby

Williamsburg passersby look at Danish photographer Asger Carlsen's surreal vinyl photographs that he pasted on a construction fence.

"Air Current(s)"

Mark Nystrom used data collected about wind speed and direction to create his seemingly abstract circles. Each ring corresponds to one hour of wind data.

"Mirror, Peephole"

Andrew Kuo's "Mirror, Peephole" featured many appropriated Internet cat photographs.

"Mirror, Peephole."

New York artist Andrew Kuo and team installed his selection of random images from the Internet on glass storefront windows.

By Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe

By Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe

Freeman and Lowe, known for their immersive installations, based their work off of the cult 1970s sci-fi film "The Star Chamber."

"Memories, Landscapes and Other Lies."

New York-based artist Ara Dymond scraped the paint off the wall that was primed for the Open Canvas event, creating this textural mural.

This past weekend, North 6th Street exploded with energy as more than 20 artists chosen by Absolut’s Open Canvas Initiative transformed a Williamsburg block of storefronts, construction fences and bare walls into colorful, stunning murals. Prompted to “Transform Today,” the artists, who were mostly from the Brooklyn area, worked with a wide variety of materials and mediums — starting with yarn.

Click through our slideshow to see how the event unspooled.

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The 20 Cutest, Coolest Things We Saw at Renegade Craft Fair

Camp Renegade

Camp Renegade

Bringing the pervasive Native American appropriation trend of the craft fair full-circle.

Custom portraits

Custom portraits

Emmiebean

Greeting cards

Greeting cards

McBitterson's

Ceramic skulls

Ceramic skulls

Beetle and Flor

Handmade ceramics

Handmade ceramics

Elizabeth Benotti

A more advanced take on the Burger King birthday paper crown.

A more advanced take on the Burger King birthday paper crown.

Wishbown Letterpress

Sketchbooks, notebooks

Sketchbooks, notebooks

Another Fucking Tote

Greeting cards

Greeting cards

Another Fucking Tote

Chalkboard maps

Chalkboard maps

Dirtsa Studio

Art and illustration by Hoi-an Tang

Art and illustration by Hoi-an Tang

Mehoi

Art and illustration by Hoi-an Tang

Art and illustration by Hoi-an Tang

Mehoi

Terrariums

Terrariums

Twig

"Alternate Orioles" and more

University of Brooklyn

Plushies and homewares

Plushies and homewares

Caitlin Wicker

Greeting cards

Greeting cards

McBitterson's

The Renegade Craft Fair set up camp in Williamsburg’s East River State Park this weekend, alongside regulars Smorgasburg and Brooklyn Flea. We withstood the sweltering heat to show you a few of our favorite things, amass a collection of business cards, and to indulge in some ice cream from the Coolhaus truck (which, unfortunately, could not withstand the heat). We may have even come away with a purchase or two – because, indeed, one can always use another bloody tote.

If you missed out on the fair, don’t worry: all of the vendors also sell their wares online, and many of them are based locally in Brooklyn. You’ll find links to their online shops with each image, and the full list of Renegade Craft vendors can be found here.