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Here and Elsewhere at the New Museum

This exhibition is New York’s first gallery-wide exhibition of artists from the Arab world, and is appropriately (and devastatingly) dedicated to exploring the ethics of representation and the status of images as instruments of political consciousness. Bringing together 45 artists and collectives from over 15 countries, from North Africa to the Gulf, Here and Elsewhere presents a sweeping, riotous portrait of a heterogeneous region heretofore underrepresented in the NYC art world.

25 Images From New Museum’s Arresting Survey of Contemporary Arab Art

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For the last fifteen years, Massimiliano Gioni has enthusiastically observed the increased presence of the work of artists of Arabic origin at various biennials and international exhibitions. “And I started getting worried and suspicious,” says the Associate Director and Director of Programming of the New Museum, “because many of these great artists—who we would see everywhere else—were not being shown in New York.”
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What Happens When Brooklyn Artists Hit Bergdorf’s? A Taxidermy Chandelier

Andrea Mary Marshall's in-store installation. Photo: Billy Farrell Agency

Andrea Mary Marshall’s in-store installation. Photo: Billy Farrell Agency

Several Brooklyn-based artists transported their signature aesthetics uptown this week, creating window displays and in-store installations for Bergdorf Goodman. Intuitively titled Ten Artists for Ten Spaces, it features the works of artists curated by Kyle DeWoody, founder of Grey Area – a company that continuously puts art in places one would least expect to find it (you’ll remember the Bic lighter ring).
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Because a Burlesque Tribute to Marina Abramovic Needed to Happen…

photo-7The real Marina Abramović is often busy chatting with the New Yorker about “being present,” making a film about James Franco and perfecting the Abramović Method, which mere mortals will soon be able to learn at the Marina Abramović Institute. Thankfully, the trend to imitate, pay tribute to or otherwise parody the famed performance artist means that we can always get our fix, even when the artist herself is not present.
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‘The Room’ Is Now Showing (No, Not the One You Throw Spoons At)

Minjung Kim, The Room, 2008, mixed media on rice paper affixed to panel, courtesy the artist and Oko

Minjung Kim, The Room, 2008, mixed media on rice paper affixed to panel, courtesy the artist and Oko

What appears to be an infinite black vortex in the miniscule space nestled between the Asian restaurants on East 10th Street are actually the detailed paintings of Korean artist Minjung Kim. Entitled “The Room” (not to be confused with the Tommy Wiseau flick that’s always playing at Sunshine) the exhibit is the artist’s first solo show in New York in over a decade, and it could not have found a more appropriate home than Oko, the nondescript East Village gallery known for its immersive art experiences.
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Alex Da Corte Sees the World Through a Piss-Filled Malt Liquor Bottle

Alex Da Corte, "April Fools," 2014: Rubber, anodized metal frames, VCT tile, wood, foam, garland, ceramic Hershey Kiss, latex witch nose, artificial mushroom, Coca-Cola can, Plexiglas 60.5 x 49 x 64 inches.

Alex Da Corte, “April Fools,” 2014: Rubber, anodized metal frames, VCT tile, wood, foam, garland, ceramic Hershey Kiss, latex witch nose, artificial mushroom, Coca-Cola can, Plexiglas 60.5 x 49 x 64 inches.

“Does the food we eat or the way we clean our toilet reflect if we’re obsessive compulsive or if we’re Virgos?” asked Alex Da Corte yesterday evening outside of American Contemporary gallery in the East Village. These are some of the questions Da Corte and five other artists address in “The Cardboard Lover,” which opened at said gallery yesterday evening. In a broader sense, the show explores the concept of “zaniness” as it applies to modern methods of production and consumerism. “It’s considering ways in which we organize domestic space and how it reflects if we’re cute or funny or serious,” Da Corte said.
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Alex Prager Used 20 Tons of Sand (and Her Sister) to Stage This Beach Scene

ALEX PRAGER Crowd #3 (Pelican Beach), 2013 archival pigment print 59.5 x 92 inches, 151.1 x 233.7 cm 60.5 x 93.56 x 2.25 inches (framed), 153.7 x 237.6 x 5.7 cm Edition of 6 Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong

ALEX PRAGER Crowd #3 (Pelican Beach), 2013 archival pigment print 59.5 x 92 inches, 151.1 x 233.7 cm 60.5 x 93.56 x 2.25 inches (framed), 153.7 x 237.6 x 5.7 cm Edition of 6 Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong

Alex Prager is not especially intimidating. The Los Angeles-based photographer is often smiling, rather petite and generally endearing. So it’s amusing to envision her atop a cherry picker, directing hundreds of actors like some sort of omniscient being, which is precisely what she did for her latest body of work, Face in the Crowd. Shot over four days on a sound stage in LA, the project features a slew of universally relatable locations (bleachers at a sports game, the beach, an airport, a generic looking rec room) populated with Prager’s friends, family and countless extras styled in flamboyant wigs and exaggerated makeup.
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Drinking Games, Puppies, and Some Paintings, Too: The Weekend in Art

Artwork by Jack Jerz.

Artwork by Jack Jerz.

The Brooklyn International Performance Art Festival wraps up this weekend. Also on deck: a dog-friendly pool party, eco-power theater, and haunting portraits of underground celebs. Read on for our weekend art picks.
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Olek Swaddled a Car in Yarn, and That Was Really Just the Beginning of Open Canvas

"Forgotten Barrier"

Olek's response to the prompt "Transform Today" was this crocheted mural, which read "All we need is love and money."

"Olek Bike"

Brooklyn-based street artist Olek displayed three pieces on North 6th, including her recognizable crocheted bike.

"Auto Install"

Maybe the most incredible piece of the Open Canvas event was Olek's completely crocheted van.

"Auto Install"

A view from the front.

Posters

Posters

Both sides of North 6th were plastered with posters from artists such as Justin Beal, Michael Zahn and tattoo artist JK5.

Posters

Posters

A finished section of posters on the south side of North 6th Street

"Magnus Salo (The Big Surge)"

Brooklyn-based multidisciplinary artist ROSTARR is known for his signature calligraphic lines, which he painted in acrylic above Music Hall of Williamsburg.

"Magnus Salo (The Big Surge)"

ROSTARR's mural was undoubtedly the highest public art piece of the Open Canvas Initiative.

"Consider Yourself Warned"

Craig Damrauer's work featured barely legible stenciled phrases warning viewers about fireworks, scams and other dangers, which he was covered with layers of paint.

Passersby

Passersby

Williamsburg passersby look at Danish photographer Asger Carlsen's surreal vinyl photographs that he pasted on a construction fence.

"Air Current(s)"

Mark Nystrom used data collected about wind speed and direction to create his seemingly abstract circles. Each ring corresponds to one hour of wind data.

"Mirror, Peephole"

Andrew Kuo's "Mirror, Peephole" featured many appropriated Internet cat photographs.

"Mirror, Peephole."

New York artist Andrew Kuo and team installed his selection of random images from the Internet on glass storefront windows.

By Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe

By Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe

Freeman and Lowe, known for their immersive installations, based their work off of the cult 1970s sci-fi film "The Star Chamber."

"Memories, Landscapes and Other Lies."

New York-based artist Ara Dymond scraped the paint off the wall that was primed for the Open Canvas event, creating this textural mural.

Olek's response to the prompt "Transform Today" was this crocheted mural, which read "All we need is love and money."Brooklyn-based street artist Olek displayed three pieces on North 6th, including her recognizable crocheted bike.Maybe the most incredible piece of the Open Canvas event was Olek's completely crocheted van.A view from the front.Both sides of North 6th were plastered with posters from artists such as Justin Beal, Michael Zahn and tattoo artist JK5.A finished section of posters on the south side of North 6th StreetBrooklyn-based multidisciplinary artist ROSTARR is known for his signature calligraphic lines, which he painted in acrylic above Music Hall of Williamsburg.ROSTARR's mural was undoubtedly the highest public art piece of the Open Canvas Initiative.Craig Damrauer's work featured barely legible stenciled phrases warning viewers about fireworks, scams and other dangers, which he was covered with layers of paint.Williamsburg passersby look at Danish photographer Asger Carlsen's surreal vinyl photographs that he pasted on a construction fence.Mark Nystrom used data collected about wind speed and direction to create his seemingly abstract circles. Each ring corresponds to one hour of wind data.Andrew Kuo's "Mirror, Peephole" featured many appropriated Internet cat photographs.New York artist Andrew Kuo and team installed his selection of random images from the Internet on glass storefront windows.Freeman and Lowe, known for their immersive installations, based their work off of the cult 1970s sci-fi film "The Star Chamber."New York-based artist Ara Dymond scraped the paint off the wall that was primed for the Open Canvas event, creating this textural mural.

This past weekend, North 6th Street exploded with energy as more than 20 artists chosen by Absolut’s Open Canvas Initiative transformed a Williamsburg block of storefronts, construction fences and bare walls into colorful, stunning murals. Prompted to “Transform Today,” the artists, who were mostly from the Brooklyn area, worked with a wide variety of materials and mediums — starting with yarn.

Click through our slideshow to see how the event unspooled.

The 20 Cutest, Coolest Things We Saw at Renegade Craft Fair

Camp Renegade

Camp Renegade

Bringing the pervasive Native American appropriation trend of the craft fair full-circle.

Custom portraits

Custom portraits

Emmiebean

Greeting cards

Greeting cards

McBitterson's

Ceramic skulls

Ceramic skulls

Beetle and Flor

Handmade ceramics

Handmade ceramics

Elizabeth Benotti

A more advanced take on the Burger King birthday paper crown.

A more advanced take on the Burger King birthday paper crown.

Wishbown Letterpress

Sketchbooks, notebooks

Sketchbooks, notebooks

Another Fucking Tote

Greeting cards

Greeting cards

Another Fucking Tote

Chalkboard maps

Chalkboard maps

Dirtsa Studio

Art and illustration by Hoi-an Tang

Art and illustration by Hoi-an Tang

Mehoi

Art and illustration by Hoi-an Tang

Art and illustration by Hoi-an Tang

Mehoi

Terrariums

Terrariums

Twig

"Alternate Orioles" and more

University of Brooklyn

Plushies and homewares

Plushies and homewares

Caitlin Wicker

Greeting cards

Greeting cards

McBitterson's

Bringing the pervasive Native American appropriation trend of the craft fair full-circle.EmmiebeanMcBitterson'sBeetle and FlorTumbleweeds HandcraftElizabeth BenottiWishbown LetterpressAnother Fucking ToteAnother Fucking ToteDirtsa StudioMehoiMehoiTwo Arms Inc.TwigUniversity of BrooklynCaitlin WickerUniversity of BrooklynState SecretMcBitterson's

The Renegade Craft Fair set up camp in Williamsburg’s East River State Park this weekend, alongside regulars Smorgasburg and Brooklyn Flea. We withstood the sweltering heat to show you a few of our favorite things, amass a collection of business cards, and to indulge in some ice cream from the Coolhaus truck (which, unfortunately, could not withstand the heat). We may have even come away with a purchase or two – because, indeed, one can always use another bloody tote.

If you missed out on the fair, don’t worry: all of the vendors also sell their wares online, and many of them are based locally in Brooklyn. You’ll find links to their online shops with each image, and the full list of Renegade Craft vendors can be found here.