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Can Luxury Chickens, Zimbabwean Mushrooms and a Williamsburg Artist Save Detroit?

Detroit-baed philanthropist Gary Wasserman speaking at Markus Linnenbrink's Williamsburg studio (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Detroit-baed philanthropist Gary Wasserman speaking at Markus Linnenbrink’s Williamsburg studio (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Everything was going rather predictably at the preview event for an upcoming arts initiative in Detroit spearheaded by Gary Wasserman, a well-known steel mogul, philanthropist, and patron of the arts in Southeast Michigan. Inside the Williamsburg studio of Markus Linnenbrink there was the requisite colorful, unprovocative artwork chosen for public display, the starchitect with an approachable design, and talk of revitalization of a bankrupt city through the arts. There were even sandwiches. But once the conversation moved into specifics about Wasserman Projects– namely, the launching of a public outreach initiative involving a modular pavilion, $250 chickens, and Zimbabwean mushrooms– that sandwich nearly fell out of my mouth.

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Enter the Institute For New Feeling, Find Your Future Through a Mystical Net Experience

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

The invitation for Seek: A Self-Fulfilling Prophesy, at Soho’s Recess gallery, was a strange one, steeped in culty vibes. “Visitors are invited to make an appointment to meet with a consultant for their personal reading. Seek is the newest treatment from Institute for New Feeling. It offers individuals a clairvoyant reading generated by the misuse of online search engines.” An invitation for a free “reading?” Check. Sounds a lot like an E-meter reading. Arcane symbols? Check. The Institute’s website is replete with them. And hold up– the Institute? Yup. It’s a self-described “research clinic committed to new ways of feeling, and ways of feeling new” that offers “a rotating menu of wellness treatments, therapies, and retreats.” Right. Needless to say we got down there quicker than you can say “Scientology.”

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In ‘Predominantly White Space,’ Bushwick Natives Show Art Grappling With Change

Painting by Anthony Rosado via BACG Instagram

Painting by Anthony Rosado via BACG Instagram

Last Wednesday, the Bushwick Art Crit Group met for an evening of critique that in many ways wasn’t out of the ordinary. Yet the founder of the non-profit community art organization, Christopher Stout, admitted later that during his opening comments his voice began to shake as he introduced the curator and opening presenter, Anthony Rosado. “No one likes to feel like you are part of the problem, especially when you are working so hard to bring good into the world,” Christopher said in a follow-up interview with B+B.

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A Threesome Messed Around With ‘Banal Erotics’ at Bushwick Open Studios

Looking at female nude photos at Chasm Gallery. (Photo Credit: Sam Gillette)

Looking at female nude photos at Chasm Gallery. (Photo Credit: Sam Gillette)

Anyone who attended Bushwick Open Studios this past weekend knows there was a plethora of penetrating art. Especially at the closing weekend of “Housebound,” an exhibit at Chasm Gallery where penises abounded.

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This Photo Show Marks a High Point for the Transgender Movement

(Photo by Robyn Hasty)

(Photo by Robyn Hasty)

Robyn Renee Hasty is no stranger to outsiders, countercultures, and misfits. So it might feel a little strange for the artist to be in the midst of what’s becoming a mainstream social movement and media obsession to match, as embodied in the debut of Caitlyn Jenner. A new exhibition featuring Hasty’s most recent work, opening Thursday at Brooklyn’s Pioneer Works, couldn’t be more timely. But even with a newfound frank (but still sometimes fraught) discussion of the transgender experience going mainstream, Hasty’s nude portraits of transgender, gender non-conforming, and cisgender people are still subversive.

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Eduardo Sarabia Turned Mexican Narco Imagery Into Fine Art

Eduardo Sarabia, "Ballads" exhibit. (photo: Rob Scher)

Eduardo Sarabia, “Ballads” exhibit. (photo: Rob Scher)

Paper holds much value, even when it’s not green, with Franklin’s unsmiling mug on it. A recent MoMA exhibit, for instance, showed Henri Matisse’s appreciation for the potential beauty of tree pulp. Another fellow who seems to have received the memo is Mexican-based artist Eduardo Sarabia, whose most recent exhibit, “Ballads,” opens today at Other Criteria gallery in Soho.

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There’s NEWD and Nude Weekend, But Only One Involves a Human Display Case

(Photo: Brooklyn Wildlife)

(Photo: Brooklyn Wildlife)

Bushwick Open Studios is upon us once again and leave it to an event of this magnitude — really though, a decade in, BOS is like post-post-post blown up at this point — to spawn a bunch of auxiliary commercialized, money-making ventures as well as some wacky, well, outside-the-mainstream artistic endeavors. This year, to help you avoid any confusion that might arise, we’re going to draw some abundantly clear lines in the sand between the Newd Art Show (what director and co-founder Kate Bryan calls “a small, digestible art fair” that “aims to invigorate the fair model”) and something called Nude Weekend. To peak your interest, let’s just say only one of these events features a “human display case.”

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Eat Like a Martian at this Supper Club’s Art Exhibition

(Photo: Menu for Mars Supper Club)

(Photo: Menu for Mars Supper Club)

“As a group, we’re imagining the future,” explained Douglas Paulson, who co-founded the Menu for Mars Supper Club with fellow artist Heidi Neilson. This weekend throughout June, the supper club– which has been holding meetups for the past year where members gather to dream up, enact, and discuss solutions to culinary life on Mars– will hold a residency at The BoilerThe Menu For Mars Kitchen, complete with tastings, cook-offs, and interactive events of all kinds. “It’s thinking expansively about interpreting the Martian experience,” Paulson explained. “We have a pretty ambitious lineup and hopefully we’ll get a lot of people who come in and try their hand at cooking something.” When the exhibition wraps up, the supper club will hand out awards to the most innovative chefs and will pack up the winning dishes and ship them off not to Mars, but to NASA in hopes their creations will be adopted in missions to Mars.

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This Exhibition Explores What Happens When Brooklyn Girls Drink Ayahuasca

Melanie Bonajo's solo exhibition "Nocturnal Gardening" on view at Company Gallery (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Melanie Bonajo’s solo exhibition “Nocturnal Gardening” on view at Company Gallery (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Walking into the Company Gallery on the Lower East Side feels like stepping inside a Tumblr. Photographs of painted people, tinted by sunlight flooding in through colorful tissue paper, are interspersed with delicate ferns and towering bamboo sticks. A lithium drone within the gallery’s white walls is broken up by Night Soil – Fake Paradise, an experimental documentary film by Melanie Bonajo in which women from Brooklyn candidly discussion their deeply personal experiences with ayahuasca. Some of the revelations are blissful and mystic while others turn completely horrifying, melting the psyche down into utterly submissive goo — Bonajo’s way of reminding us of the immeasurable power of psychedelic substances.

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Why Do These Women Have Flowers In Their Mouths?

From the Petal Series. (Photo: Tal Shpantzer.)

From the Petal Series. (Photo: Tal Shpantzer.)

Williamsburg’s Honey Gifts will be displaying more than just the usual lingerie and sex toys this Friday night. Brooklyn artist Tal Shpantzer has adorned the shop’s windows with images of women holding flowers and petals in their mouths. The photographs from Shpantzer’s Petal Series are inspired by Dadaism and, specifically, Hannah Höch’s collages. They’re striking, intense, and beautiful–some of the women look a little sad, others almost feral.

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Young, Colored, & Angry Brings Together Artists of Color, Takes Back Art Education

Elliott Brown and Ashley Syed (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Elliott Brown, Jr. and Ashley Rahimi Syed (Photo: Nicole Disser)

When I first heard about a one-off art show and serial online publication called Young, Colored & Angry, the name really stuck with me. There really couldn’t be a better moment to discuss such a fraught label. The term might not be instantly recognizable, but the implications are all too familiar particularly in the label’s application to protestors in various cities as of late. It can be used as a way to dismiss, delegitimize, and patronize grievances related to race relations in the U.S., particularly those between people of color and the police. But Young, Colored & Angry the publication–which, by the way, is run by two self-proclaimed young, colored, and angry individuals, 22-year-old Ashley Rahimi Syed and 21-year-old Elliott Brown, Jr.– is less explicitly about the now-politics of race and the police and more about the artistic expression that is inevitably steeped in similar experiences and other instances of discrimination.

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