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Art: “First Person View” Drone Exhibition

Cara Francis sets up her drone for "Remote" (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Cara Francis sets up her drone for “Remote” (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Drones– amongst the most controversial technology of our time– as weapons, tools, and toys have given us the opportunity to see things through a new pair of eyes. Curators at Knockdown Center spent months recruiting a bunch of artists to utilize drones in relation to art work, however that may be interpreted.Visitors will have a chance to fly the drones themselves through various obstacle course-like installations and engage with them in participatory performance art like Cara Francis’ Remote in which the artist’s drone interrogates then dances with volunteers.

Special performances are scheduled throughout the exhibition’s tenure.

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Penelope Gazin Draws Monstrous Broads and Alien Goddesses as If She Were ‘Living in a Cave’

Penelope Gazin in front of her work (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Penelope Gazin in front of her work (Photo: Nicole Disser)

We’re guessing the world would look a whole lot different if bad ass women like Penelope Gazin had been well-represented in animation and comics from the start. But Gazin has her hand in so many projects, it’s almost as if she’s single-handedly trying to make up for lost time. Her paintings, drawings, and animations have a unique staying power, and will almost certainly end up plastered all over the walls of your skull if you spend some time with them. Gazin’s sassy, hilarious, and sometimes twisted images of alien babes and monster princesses don’t depart amicably.

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Molly Soda, an Artist Who’s ‘Famous On Tumblr,’ Explores IRL

Molly Soda outside Stream Gallery in Bushwick (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Molly Soda outside Stream Gallery in Bushwick (Photo: Nicole Disser)

I was in Detroit for New Year’s Eve sometime in the recent past, and ended up partying at a place called North End Studios. I was taking lots of stupid party photos and snapped a photo of a friend who had nestled up to another girl I didn’t know. This mystery woman was clutching a tallboy of Coors, not unusual, but she also wore purple-painted eyebrows, a high-collared ivory fur coat, and a black beanie with skulls on it. I posted it on Instagram and instantly accumulated a hefty number of likes.

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Bushwick Art Scene Champion Norte Maar Has a New Home in East New York

"Rooftops of Cypress Hills" (Photo by Jason Andrew)

“Rooftops of Cypress Hills” (Photo by Jason Andrew)

“Bushwick is on its own, she doesn’t need our help anymore,” laughed Jason Andrew, co-founder of Norte Maar. “She really doesn’t need our help anymore.” Though neither he nor his partner, Julia K. Gleich, have quit the neighborhood entirely, they’ve taken what to many was a quintessentially Bushwick arts organization (see: Beat Nite, the biannual art party at galleries and studios throughout the neighborhood the organization has begotten) and moved its headquarters to East New York. “Our plight is the same as everybody else’s in New York, we just want to try and find a way to stay here,” Jason said.

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‘I Love You Bedford’ Showcases Local Designing Women

Inside I Love You Bedford Ave. (Photo Credit: Sam Gillette)

Inside I Love You Bedford Ave. (Photo Credit: Sam Gillette)

Before you buy a Whopcorn ice cream cone at the new Davey’s Ice Cream in Williamsburg and have it melt onto your shirt, stop a few blocks away at I Love You Bedford Ave – a high fashion clothing and art object store that opened last month. The name of the store, on Bedford Avenue, also refers to owner Alisha Trimble’s more humble beginnings. A womenswear designer for 10 years, Trimble opened the first store in an apartment sporting the address of 143. For the millennials who don’t know what a pager is, much less how to use one, 1-4-3 was also the way to page “I love you.”

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Clayton Patterson Fights ‘Homogenization, Destruction of Anything Independent and Outside’

Outside In at Howl! Happening (Photo: Nicole Disser)

“Outside In” at Howl! Happening (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Last year, Clayton Patterson announced that he and Elsa Rensaa, his partner and collaborator of more than 40 years, were moving from the Lower East Side to a small spa town in Austria. Lucky for anyone who admires his unflagging commitment to keeping it real and his tirades against the processes of gentrification and corporatization (see: his damning of Taylor Swift as the city’s cultural ambassador), the 66-year-old outsider artist, photographer, tattoo artist, dissident, and haberdasher who is known to many as the neighborhood’s “last bohemian” is not just still residing there, he also has a new solo exhibition. If you haven’t had a chance to see “Outside In” at Howl! Happening, tonight is the night to do so: the gallery will be screening Captured, the must-see documentary about Clayton’s obsessive documentation of the city as it once was.

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Surface Support, the Show for Artists Who are Smashing the Screen

"Runaway Interludes / 20 Channel Jamboree vol. 8 (Market Static)" 2015, work by Jessie Stead on view at "Surface Support," Signal Gallery (Photo: Nicole Disser)

“Runaway Interludes / 20 Channel Jamboree vol. 8 (Market Static)” 2015, work by Jessie Stead on view at “Surface Support,” Signal Gallery (Photo: Nicole Disser)

A new group exhibition at Signal Gallery Surface Support started out with the question, “How does video exist outside itself?” Curator Amanda Schmitt has worked with video artists since about the dawn of Postinternet thinking. It’s almost as if now that thinking too heavily about the internet as a thing (and just accepting it as an inherent part of aesthetics, social interaction, and sadly even existence) we can get back to thinking about video in new ways again. “Video and of course screens changed the way we think,” Amanda explained. “We’re always on our phones now, so sometimes we take it for granted.”

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I Found Out What This Courtney Barnett’s All About at Her Pop-Up Exhibit

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

Ludlow Studios was packed to the brim with people for the private one-night only event to celebrate and ogle Australian singer-songwriter Courtney Barnett’s art work. The crowd included everyone from stylish hip kids furtively scanning the room for Barnett’s messy brown mane to appear somewhere in the crowd, loafers who weren’t sure exactly what all the hoopla and video cameras were all about but knew for certain there were infinite free mezcal cocktails to be guzzled, and the nearing-the-top-of-the-hills sponging around to see what the kids are into these days. I’m not old, but this event made me feel old, particularly because up until I heard word of this event, I had no idea who Courtney Barnett was.

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Con Artist Has Art So Cheap You Can Eat It, Trust

"The $20 Art Show" at Con Artist Gallery (Photo: Nicole Disser)

“The $20 Art Show” at Con Artist Gallery (Photo: Nicole Disser)

I’d never seen art move so quickly off the walls as I did last night at Con Artist Collective‘s Lower East Side gallery. Things were so hectic that it was difficult even to talk to founder Brian Shevlin about the unusual exhibition. His eyes were too busy darting to and from the small, rectangular pieces of art as they were gently taken off the walls, wrapped in red plastic bags, and quickly replaced by more art works. It felt like a feeding frenzy, and I couldn’t help but join in. Snagging some art myself, I realized I’d never even considered buying art in a gallery before this. I mean, definitely the $20 price tag had something, a lot, to do with making an already appealing piece of work feel accessible. “We did this based on Bread & Puppet Theater’s Why Cheap Art? Manifesto,” Shevlin explained. “Basically, we believe that artists should be required to make cheap art.”

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Can Luxury Chickens, Zimbabwean Mushrooms and a Williamsburg Artist Save Detroit?

Detroit-baed philanthropist Gary Wasserman speaking at Markus Linnenbrink's Williamsburg studio (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Detroit-baed philanthropist Gary Wasserman speaking at Markus Linnenbrink’s Williamsburg studio (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Everything was going rather predictably at the preview event for an upcoming arts initiative in Detroit spearheaded by Gary Wasserman, a well-known steel mogul, philanthropist, and patron of the arts in Southeast Michigan. Inside the Williamsburg studio of Markus Linnenbrink there was the requisite colorful, unprovocative artwork chosen for public display, the starchitect with an approachable design, and talk of revitalization of a bankrupt city through the arts. There were even sandwiches. But once the conversation moved into specifics about Wasserman Projects– namely, the launching of a public outreach initiative involving a modular pavilion, $250 chickens, and Zimbabwean mushrooms– that sandwich nearly fell out of my mouth.

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Enter the Institute For New Feeling, Find Your Future Through a Mystical Net Experience

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

The invitation for Seek: A Self-Fulfilling Prophesy, at Soho’s Recess gallery, was a strange one, steeped in culty vibes. “Visitors are invited to make an appointment to meet with a consultant for their personal reading. Seek is the newest treatment from Institute for New Feeling. It offers individuals a clairvoyant reading generated by the misuse of online search engines.” An invitation for a free “reading?” Check. Sounds a lot like an E-meter reading. Arcane symbols? Check. The Institute’s website is replete with them. And hold up– the Institute? Yup. It’s a self-described “research clinic committed to new ways of feeling, and ways of feeling new” that offers “a rotating menu of wellness treatments, therapies, and retreats.” Right. Needless to say we got down there quicker than you can say “Scientology.”

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In ‘Predominantly White Space,’ Bushwick Natives Show Art Grappling With Change

Painting by Anthony Rosado via BACG Instagram

Painting by Anthony Rosado via BACG Instagram

Last Wednesday, the Bushwick Art Crit Group met for an evening of critique that in many ways wasn’t out of the ordinary. Yet the founder of the non-profit community art organization, Christopher Stout, admitted later that during his opening comments his voice began to shake as he introduced the curator and opening presenter, Anthony Rosado. “No one likes to feel like you are part of the problem, especially when you are working so hard to bring good into the world,” Christopher said in a follow-up interview with B+B.

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