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Week in Film: Love Poems You Never Knew Were Communist and Pour One Out for Your Katz’s Homies


Neruda
Now through Thursday January 5 at IFC Center: $14

For all you literary nerds out there, here’s your once-in-a-great-while chance to see a film about a poet– which, strangely, is something the movie bizz must be really feeling right now because whatddya know, Jarmusch’s new one, Paterson, also puts a poet front and center. What makes Neruda an even rarer opportunity is that Pablo Neruda, the Nobel Prize-winning Chilean poet in question, is hardly some rugged, hard-boiled Anglo-centric beardo. Rather, Neruda is best know for his simple, yet heart-crushing love poems (especially the ones contained in Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair.)

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The Man Who Fell to Earth: David Bowie’s Formative Years in ’70s New York

Mourners laid flowers and outside David Bowie's apartment on Lafayette Street (Kavitha Surana)

Mourners laid flowers and outside David Bowie’s apartment on Lafayette Street (Kavitha Surana)

By now you’re well aware that David Bowie has died, just days after his 69th birthday and the release of his 25th studio album. During the wee hours of January 10, it was announced that the beloved glam-rock icon who embraced androgyny and far-out, endlessly influential aesthetics “died peacefully today surrounded by his family after a courageous 18 month battle with cancer.”

After finding fame in his hometown of London and absconding to the U.S. in 1974, Bowie moved amongst New York’s downtown crowd, popping up at places like Andy Warhol’s Factory and Max’s Kansas City, before relocating to Los Angeles. We consulted a number of publications — one of them yet to be published — that offered an eye into Bowie’s life in early-’70s NYC.
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Film: English-Language Premiere of Paolo Sorrentino’s Youth

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From Paolo Sorrentino, the director of The Great Beauty, comes Youth, a sort of part II to the first film that offers a Northern European take on the theme of getting old. Instead of a lush, Mediterranean backdrop draped in eye-popping golds and jewel tones plucked straight from a Dolce & Gabbana runway show where everyone seems to be glowing with a dewey, youthful tan (achieved by way of plastic or otherwise), Youthbrings us far from the earthiness of The Great Beauty. Instead, we find ourselves elevated to a tight-lipped, carefully-placed-spectacles kind of place that’s big on daily regimes: a Swiss spa town. It’s all minerals and cold, wet stone here. Read more here.

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Film: Jayne County Leads an Outrageous ’80 German Trans Musical and Sisters Buck the Patriarchy

Film still from City of Lost Souls (Via UnionDocs)

Film still from City of Lost Souls (Via UnionDocs)

City of Lost Souls
Friday Nov. 20th, 7:30 pm at Union Docs: $9

Juliet Jacques, the author of Trans: A Memoir, which accounts for her own experiences transitioning from male to female and her life from childhood up to her present 30-something self, will be on hand to present City of Lost Souls, a “trans musical spectacular.” Filmed in 1982, it provides an early look at identity politics and trans identity years before there was mainstream understanding of what it means to be trans. The film is such an early example of gender exploration that it’s lacking in recognizable “transgender” language– in fact, the word is never mentioned in the film (though there are instances of its use at that time).

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Slouching Towards Shia LaBeouf: 13-Hour Waits and They’re Still Lining Up For #AllMyMovies

(Photo: Josh Alvarez)

(Photo: Joshua Alvarez)

A lot has changed since we headed down to Angelika Film Center on Tuesday and were able to get right in to see Nymphomaniac with Shia LaBeouf. Around 11 a.m. this morning, a line wound back and forth across the Center’s lobby and spilled out the front door and down the block.

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We Watched Shia LaBeouf Watching Shia in the Buff, and You Can Too

A shot of the livestream outside of Angelika.

A shot of the livestream outside of Angelika.

The rumors are true: Shia LaBeouf is currently holed up in the bowels of Angelika Film Center, where over 70 people are lined up waiting for the opportunity to watch Nymphomaniac with him. The line has steadily grown since I showed up to his #AllMyFilms “performance” around 3:20 p.m., when there were just a few dozen stalkers patrons of the arts queued up.

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Week in Film: Ryan Gosling Tries to Direct and Punks in Escobar-Era Colombia

Welcome back to another week of exciting film picks by us. Again, you ask? Yes, again. Relentless? Perhaps. Hint: it will never end. So get used to this undeniable brilliance mixed with essential despair because based on what the stars are telling me, this will never subside. That is unless of course Waka Flocka Flame actually does win the Presidency. In that case, the revolution will have come and gone and only a perfect utopia will remain. At that point I can’t make any promises. Until then, we have each other.

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Week in Film: Sex & Death Cults, Secret Societies, And Sibling Rival Lovers

Welcome back to Reel Psyched in which we talk about films we’re REALLY excited to see this week and beyond. There seems to be a particular breeze blowing this week– evil, the occult, and seduction. Our picks this week will have your blood boiling and your back hair curling. Seen on film this week are death cults, Oxford boys, and murderous brother-sister lovers– all equally horrifying in their own ways. Pro tip: Wear sunglasses so you can avoid covering your eyes, that way your date won’t be ashamed he or she is accompanying a baby wussy pants to the cinema. Good luck out there, kids!

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Week In Film: Devil Worshipping Tots, Lesser-Known Cronenberg, And Psychotic Breaks Galore

Yeesh this week has been nightmarishly sedate. What with the “blizzard,” then the subways lumbering along like mortally wounded snakes for days after with no explanation, and the piles and piles of snow making everything about daily life just that much more terrible. Thankfully, things are a little more, uh, shall we say lubricated since it’s Friday. We suggest that, after you’ve had sufficient enough drinks at the bar you’ve been sitting at all day to forget who you are, you slither directly into a movie theater near you to rediscover your humanity.
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Week In Film: Burroughs Bugs, Rogue Abortions, and Debauchery in ’70s Brazil

Man this week has been brutal. What with the snow and the slow-as-hell trains and the wind and the ice, how will we ever get through the magnified pain of daily existence from here until, like, May? An old-fashioned trip to the cinema, that’s how! There are a slew of great new films to see and some old ones screening this week too. Check out our picks for films this week below.
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This Week In Film: The Stoner Detective, Javanese Vibes, And Exploding Heads

Wow it’s been a whole week since we brought you a list of films, which means it’s time for another list of movies screening this weekend and beyond. We’ve brought you a whole bunch of films that are a little more mind-blowing than you might be used to– apparently there are some seriously mystical vibes in the moving image stratosphere right now.
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Millennials Before The Millennium, A Master Of Forgery, and Murderous Tweens

The Zero Theorem
Terry Gilliam returns with another Dystopian Sci-Fi thriller, the third installment in a series that began with Brazil and followed with 12 Monkeys. Qohen Leth (Christropher Waltz) is an eccentric computer programmer who works for an ominous and shadowy entity known simply as Management, but finds himself in the midst of an existentialist crisis, trapped in a new world order that leaves no room for individual expression.
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