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Turntablist Legend Kid Koala On Venturing Into Video Games and His ‘Totally Bonkers’ Live Show

(Photo: Corinne Merrell)

It’s hard to imagine now how groundbreaking Radiohead’s Kid A was. I’d seen Radiohead in a small Dallas club when “Creep” was hot, and ran to see them all-grows-up at MSG in 2001—but equally jaw-dropping was the opening act, Kid Koala. For music dorks-slash-turntable geeks, Kid Koala executed skillz that were technically mindblowing, while playing actual music that was swoonable for audience members who weren’t hawk-watching the camera trained on his decks.

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Filmworker Documentary Shows What It Was Like to Be a ‘Slave to Kubrick’

A scene from Filmworker, courtesy Kino Lorber.

Nineteen years after he died just days after screening a final cut of Eyes Wide Shut, Stanley Kubrick is making a comeback. Actually, don’t call it a comeback. After all, films like A Clockwork Orange and The Shining are already the bread and butter of art-house theaters (so much so that the Alamo Drafthouse’s carpeting is a reproduction of the Overlook Hotel’s). But Kubrick looms especially large these days.

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Secrets of the Rat Cave: How René Dreifuss Overcame a Crippling Car Accident to Become a Radical MMA Sensei

(Photos: Mathew Silver)

Through the front door of a slightly fogged glass storefront, past a couple of racks filled with issues of Jiu-Jitsu Magazine, past several cubbies stuffed with colorful shoes and socks, past a white wall with a large yin and yang symbol, through a giant keyhole-shaped archway, and down a flight of cold iron steps, is the Rat Cave. That’s where René Dreifuss, the founder of Radical MMA, a mixed martial arts studio a couple blocks south of Penn Station, is teaching his 7:30pm judo and jiu-jitsu class.

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What to Watch at the Greenpoint Film Festival This Weekend

Image courtesy of Greenpoint Film Festival’s Website

The Tribeca Film Festival may be over, but another homegrown flicks fest is just beginning. The 7th Annual Greenpoint Film Festival will take over North Brooklyn this weekend, with four days of films and panel discussions.

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Feminist HPV, Charles Atlas, and More Performance Picks

WEDNESDAY

(image via Andrew Hardigg / Facebook)

Gorilla Manners / Atlas / Coffee Cup Conundrum
Wednesday, May 2 at Dixon Place, 7:30 pm: $15 advance, $18 doors

Tonight, you can get not one, not two, but three shows in the same night. The first is Gorilla Manners, a play by Andrew Hardigg directed by Jordan J. Baum, which includes a character called Vaseline and a gorilla who does not like being stared at for too long (hence the “manners” portion of the title, I suppose). The second is Atlas, a show by The Red Lines that explores how communication can be distorted by the artifice that we create. The third, Coffee Cup Conundrum, not only works well as a tongue twister or vocal warm-up, but will likely also remind us about the massive amount of plastic we throw away and how we’re only going to be able to ignore it for so much longer. So, there’s something for everyone! Keep Reading »

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Celebrate Brooklyn Drops Lineup of Free Outdoor Shows: Common, Breeders, Antibalas and More

(Photo: David Andrako)

With Summerstage, Northside, Governors BallElectric Zoo, and Basilica Soundscape having recently announced their lineups, it’s time for another fixture of the outdoor concert scene, BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn, to show us what it has in store. As usual, the programmers are offering a dizzyingly diverse gamut of free concerts at the Prospect Park Bandshell, from The Breeders to Antibalas to Kronos Quartet. There will also be ticketed shows from The Decembrists (June 13), Grizzly Bear (June 20), and Courtney Barnett (July 25).

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The Last Nights of Silent Barn, Bushwick’s DIY Bastion

The attendees of Silent Barn’s Last Rites goodbye concert during the show’s final hour, 4/30/18 at 3am. (Photos: Nick McManus)

After announcing its closure in March, Silent Barn said goodbye on Sunday night with a concert aptly named Last Rites. The all-night event included a line-up of house favorites and a back-room dance party where the partitioned workspaces had been demolished ahead of the collectively-run Bushwick venue’s departure. Though it survived the loss of its previous space, a fire in the new one and constant financial issues, Silent Barn had soldiered on inside its bright, muraled collection of buildings on a tiny trianglular city block. Local youth community group Educated Little Monsters, which was housed there, had hoped to take over the lease with the help of a recent fundraiser but as ELM founder Yazmine “Jazo Brooklyn” Colon told us, “the landlord would not negotiate even though were under the impression he would.”

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Richard Prince Raised $150K For the Resistance, With This Composite of Trump’s Accusers

On the brink of Donald Trump’s inauguration last year, Richard Prince caused a stir when he disavowed the portrait he had made for Ivanka Trump, one of his (in)famous Instagram-on-canvas works. At the time, it was uncertain if Prince’s disavowal really meant anything, since Ivanka reportedly declined to take back the $36,000 she had paid him and it’s possible the notoriously meta artist’s publicity-grabbing antics only raised the piece’s value. Now, however, Prince is putting his money where his mouth is; last night he raised $150,000 for an anti-Trump PAC by selling versions of his latest work, “18 & Stormy,” a composite of photos of Stormy Daniels and 18 women who have accused Donald Trump of sexual misconduct.

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Feminine Power, Queer Nightlife, and More Art This Week

“Summer Sisters” 2018 by Rebecca Leveille (image via The Untitled Space)

The End of Love
Opening Tuesday, May 1 at The Untitled Space, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through May 13.

For an exhibition sporting as foreboding a title as The End of Love, Rebecca Leveille’s paintings are so entrancing as to inspire a sort of optimism in the viewer. In addition to being strikingly beautiful, her paintings portray feminine beauty, bliss, and sexuality in a way that’s playful and mixes elements of realism and mythology, allowing for a mental break from the seemingly constant barrage of nonsense coming from the world. Leveille is no stranger to the realm of the fantastical, as she has previously created illustrations for Magic: The Gathering under the name Rebecca Guay. Looking to how the artist herself has spoken of this show, the connection between the title and the content begins to feel more clear. “What comes after delusions of ‘love?,’” she writes. “Feminine power and sexuality find new ground, as does an urgency to assert the female gaze.” Keep Reading »