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Watch Matthew McConaughey Feed Beer to a Kitten in the New Trailer For Harmony Korine’s The Beach Bum

When he immortalized the words “spring break forever,” he meant it. The red-band trailer for Harmony Korine’s The Beach Bum just landed, and it finds the director of Spring Breakers once again plumbing the soul of Florida Man, humanity’s ne plus ultra of low-rent debauchery and depravity. In this case, in lieu of James Franco’s Alien, we have Matthew McConaughey as Moondog, described as a “rebellious burnout who always lives life by his own rules.” Basically, he’s a turnt Big Lebowski.

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Mapplethorpe, Warhol, and More Art This Week

“Andy Warhol, Self Portrait, 1986” Image credit: Courtesy Andy Warhol Foundation for Visual Arts/ Artists Rights Society (ARS)

Andy Warhol: By Hand, Drawings 1950s-1980s
Opening Tuesday, January 22 at New York Academy of Art, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through March 10.

Most people know Andy Warhol by his colorful printed pop art creations, films, and tendency to bring together some of the city’s most intriguing artists, writers, socialites, and drag performers. Or perhaps his associations with The Velvet Underground or Interview magazine come to mind. But Warhol also made drawings—he started out as a commercial illustrator—and you can see a selection of them created over the course of 30 years in a new exhibition at the New York Academy of Art. Rather than the bold shades of Warhol works like the iconic painting Campbell’s Soup Cans, these drawings are more minimal, often featuring nothing more than a pencil and paper. If you’ve already seen the sprawling Whitney retrospective, here’s a chance to see the artist in a new light. Keep Reading »

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Two New Purveyors of Upside-Down Pies Square Off

(Photos courtesy of Upside Pizza)

We recently noted that the “Rhode Island-style pizza” coming to the East Village wasn’t, in fact, the focaccia-style rectangular pies so ubiquitous in the state. If that was a bummer, well, take heart: two new purveyors of crusty, square, sauce-forward slices just opened in Manhattan. They’re specializing, specifically, in upside-down pies.

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Nigerian Cuisine Makes Slow But Spicy Inroads to Manhattan

A large plate at The Suya Guy. (Photos: Nandini Rathi)

Hema Agwu, who grew up in Lagos, Nigeria, has found a flamboyant way of bringing the taste of his country to New York. The 29-year-old self-taught chef serves suya — a roasted skewer meat relished in the streets of Nigeria — at The Suya Guy. After making an initial appearance last November as a pop-up in Crown Heights, the eatery is back – permanently.

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50 Photos From the Third Annual Women’s March in NYC

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

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Trump is still in office, and the patriarchy is not yet smashed, so for the third January in a row the streets of NYC filled with thousands of angry women and their equally angry male allies. And despite a fracturing of the Women’s March movement into three separate events on Saturday, the rally and march on the Upper West Side and Midtown drew an impressive crowd, with protesters thick on the broad avenues into the afternoon.
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Performance Picks: Literary Roasts, Asian Drag, 100 People In A Room

WEDNESDAY

(image via Drunk Education / Facebook)

Drunk Education: Roasts of ‘Great’ Literary Men
Wednesday, January 16 at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, 7 pm: FREE

The books you read in school growing up (and maybe even now) were most likely written by (white) men, save for a few exceptions. There were plenty of opportunities to discuss this work, usually mandatory, but most of the time this involved parsing through the analytical layers of it all, marveling at what a multifaceted creation had come into existence at the hands of these men. Wednesday’s Drunk Education is a little different. Notable literary men will be the central topic, yes, but they’ll be roasted by three women writers (Rolling Stone’s Brittany Spanos, Observer’s Helen Holmes, and freelancer Becca Schuh) until nothing is left but some charred remains. Keep Reading »

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Art This Week: City Collages, Uyghur Portraits, and 2 Shows in 1

John Driscoll (image via Fridman Gallery / Facebook)

Slight Perturbations / The Weight of Things
Opening Wednesday, January 16 at Fridman Gallery, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through February 13.

Fridman Gallery’s new space on Bowery has two levels, upper and lower. Fittingly, there will be two exhibitions opening there this Wednesday: a show of of interactive sound sculptures by John Driscoll in the upper space, and a two-channel video installation by Dana Levy centered around the Palace of Versailles in the lower space. Driscoll’s sculptures resemble hodgepodge collections of found objects or avant-garde furniture pieces crossed with a science fair, but they’re much more than something to puzzle over: they contain minuscule microphones and speakers, and a “reflective foil” that creates sound with help from whatever objects are nearby. And though it’s in the lower level, Levy’s video work deals with the upper crust of Versailles, depicting the palace’s contents steadily crumbling due to an earthquake. Keep Reading »

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Immersive Theater Invites You to Solve a Mystery With the Help of a Pyschopomp

(Photos: Zach Filkoff)

Thrill-seekers rejoice! There’s a new high-stakes psychological immersive play in town, and the subject is none other than death and mortality. The Mortality Machine, by Sinking Ship Creations, takes place in a Canal Street basement where, as the story goes, five people died in 2014 as a consequence of a botched medical experiment. Soon after, the facility was closed off and the evidence was buried under countless legal documents. Five years later, a lawyer manages to get access to the basement, which sets the story in motion as participants investigate what exactly happened.

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