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Opioid Crisis Must Be Fought With More Than Words, Says LES Harm Reduction Center

LESHRC Peer Will C. pictured in the needle and syringe exchange area. (Credit: David Nager)

In New York City, the opioid crisis is seen every day in the lines outside methadone clinics and needles exchanges across the city. At the Lower East Side Harm Reduction Center, the record numbers of drug-overdose deaths has brought into focus the need for additional resources for combating opioid abuse.

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A Herstory of Lesbian Bars in NYC: Gwen Shockey Charts No Man’s Land

Since 1994, Cubbyhole has been a kitsch haven for the city’s LGBT community. Inside, fizzy pop tunes reverberate against $2 happy hours and a ceiling covered with paper holiday ornaments. Outside, though, you’re crashed back into the touristy, suburban feel of the West Village.

That’s what queer artist Gwen Shockey saw during her Sunday morning excursions. “On Sundays, you get a true sense of who is now living in these neighborhoods. They are mostly straight white families with a lot of wealth,” she says, sitting across Cubbyhole in mid-October. “But this place has held up.” Camera in hand, she’s been documenting the history of lesbian bars like Cubbyhole – one of four sites still standing in the five boroughs.

Compelled by this changing landscape, the 29-year-old wanted to make the invisible lesbian bar scene visible again. These forgotten watering holes, many of which have been razed or repurposed into restaurants, will resurface in her solo show Addresses, which opened today at Amos Eno Gallery in Bushwick. She uncovers almost a century’s worth of lesbian herstory through photographs accompanied by back issues of the Village Voice and audio interviews.

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Barbara Kruger’s New Skatepark Art Has Skaters Flipping Out

(Photo: @markatthemusuem)

Have you ever wanted to land a nollie heelflip on an art installation? Maybe you can’t skateboard (like me), and would simply prefer to enjoy the artwork as a work of cultural commentary? (I totally did an ollie once, but that was in Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 4 with the cheats on.) Either way, Barbara Kruger’s latest work, Untitled (Skate), is on display at the Coleman Skatepark under the Manhattan Bridge, now through Nov. 19.

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Performance Picks: Immersive Witchcraft, FMK, Branded Comedy

THURSDAY

(flyer via Branded Content: A Corporate Variety Hour / Facebook)

Branded Content Presents: Whole Foods
Thursday, November 2 at Pine Box Rock Shop, 8 pm: FREE

Ah, it appears the brands are at it again, my friends. The brands are always at it again. In this case, the brands are going seasonal, as the weather is finally getting colder some of the days but other days it feels like summer still and the earth will surely burn to a crisp sooner than we know it. Anyway, while we still have time on this strange planet we call home, you might as well spend a Thursday night watching some free comedy at a show that is all about the perils and peculiarities of brands and their content. The evening is hosted by Simone Norman and Jackson Fisher, and features Jay Jurden, Jeremyah Schur, Mary Houlihan, Kate Dellis, Gianmarco Soresi, and Chanel Ali, with a little help from the biggest jokester of all, Whole Foods. Keep Reading »

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What Goes Bump in the Subway? Spooky New York Transit Tales

Entropy and much else haunts New York’s rapid transit system, one of the oldest in the world. The subway is fertile grounds for fear: the rats, the tons of dirt above your head, and the leaks you hope are water. And when you get home, you may find that bedbugs got off at your stop. Inspired, Andrew Duncan Farmer has written a collection of “Scary Stories to Read on the Subway,” with illustrations by Bats Langley.

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Protesters Decry ‘Racism Disguised as Art’ as Controversial Chinatown Show Closes

(Photo: Summer Eldemire)

Most artists would be happy to have a closing party thrown for their show. Not Omer Fast. On Saturday, activist groups held a protest to celebrate the end of an exhibition they deemed “racism disguised as art.” Fast’s work was an insult to native Chinatown residents being pushed out by galleries, critics argued.

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Art This Week: Continued Haunts, Queer Ceramics, and Planning Ahead For Death

(image via Leslie-Lohman Museum / Facebook)

Objectified
Opening Friday, November 3 at Leslie+Lohman Prince Street Project, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through November 5.

This swift three-day exhibition shows the work of queer ceramic artist Caitlin Rose Sweet. I first encountered Sweet’s work when I interviewed her about a show she was doing inspired by Bosch’s notorious triptych The Garden of Earthly Delights. Since then, she hasn’t stopped whipping up sculptural pieces that impressively mix elements of grotesque and feminine. Friday, her solo show Objectified is unveiled to the public, placing the queer femme body in all its manifestations on view. Sweet’s ceramic sculpture creations can resemble traditional craft art, domestic home goods, genitalia, gnarled fingers, and fantastical beasts all at once. Will you be entranced or spooked? Keep Reading »

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Banksy Precursor Richard Hambleton Dies at 65, Days Before MoMA Show and Shadowman Film

(Photo: Ben Buchanan, courtesy of Storyville Films and Motto Pictures)

Richard Hambleton died at the age of 65 on Sunday night, according to the makers of a forthcoming documentary about the downtown artist whose work inspired Banksy and was at one point as valuable as that of Basquiat and Haring.

Hambleton died in his hometown of New York City, according to an announcement from the Shadowman Twitter account. The cause and circumstances are not yet known, a publicist for the film said.

The pioneering artist’s death came at a time when his career was on the brink of a renaissance. Shadowman premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in April amidst two Hambleton exhibits, and is set to open theatrically at Quad Cinema on Dec. 1. In addition, one of Hambleton’s iconic “Shadowman” paintings, from 1982, is featured in a MoMA exhibit that opens today, “Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983.”

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