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Tinder Live Celebrates Five Years of Comedic Swiping

(photo: Mindy Tucker, courtesy of Lane Moore)

Most dating apps can be depressing. But Tinder, in all its swipe-based simplicity, is a digital landscape with perhaps the most potential to expose how absurd humanity can behave when it’s looking to get laid. Someone who knows this well is comedian, musician, and writer Lane Moore, who has been delving into the weird world of online dating through her comedy show Tinder Live, which will be celebrating its fifth year of existence tonight. Keep Reading »

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Space Odyssey Meets Beckett in This Far-Out Play

(Photo: Russ Rowland)

It’s been a long voyage for Erin Treadway, the sole actor onstage during Spaceman. The playwhich, this week, is finishing up its run at the Wild Project theater on East 3rd Streetwas originally supposed to have had a full run last year. But it was cut short when, during a curtain call, Treadway tripped over a speaker and broke both her arms.

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Poison Ivory, The Pregnant Burlesque Performer Who Refused to Be Bumped Off Stage

(Photo: Dave Wood)

At a Switch n’ Play show at Branded Saloon earlier this month, Poison Ivory gave one of her last burlesque performances for a while. Des’ree’s “Kissing You” poured through the speakers, and she treated her captive Brooklyn audience to a classical fan dance (you know the kind: it pairs sultry, languid limbs with the brisk fluttering of oversized feathers). Less classic was her belly, which made a bold appearance each time the two massive fans parted ways. She was, then, 32 weeks pregnant.

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Dig the New Trailer For the Other Music Doc, Premiering at Tribeca Film Fest

It’s been a year and a half since we last checked in on the Other Music documentary, but it looks like the beloved, bygone East Village record shop is finally getting its moment on the big screen. The doc’s world premiere will be at the Tribeca Film Festival, it was announced today.

The festival, which runs April 24 to May 5, revealed its feature lineup today and Other Music is listed as part of a documentary series, “This Used to Be New York,” featuring films that “harken back to a quintessential New York cultural moment and community that burned bright in NYC history.” (Other selections include a documentary about Lower East Side photographer Martha Cooper and the premiere of maverick filmmaker Abel Ferrara’s The Projectionist, said to be his first NYC-set film in nearly ten years).

To announce the Other Music doc’s premiere, the filmmakers have dropped a new trailer featuring footage from the jazz funeral that marked the shop’s closing in 2016, alongside commentary from JD Samson of Le Tigre, Brian Chase of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Martin Gore of Depeche Mode, and Matt Berninger of The National. Others interviewed for the doc include Ezra Koenig of Vampire Weekend, Tunde Adebimpe of TV on the Radio, Regina Spektor, and actor-musician Jason Schwartzman.

To help fund the film’s color correction, sound mix, and other finishing touches, a new Kickstarter campaign is aiming to raise $20,000. Contributor perks include everything from records signed by some of the artists featured in the film, album description cards left over from the store, and passes to the Other Music-curated Come Together record fair and music fest, happening at PS1 on March 23 and 24.

Check out the new trailer via the Kickstarter page. Tribeca’s schedule won’t be released until March 13, but passes are currently on sale.

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Celebrate Women’s History Month With These Female-Focused Films

“Captain Marvel” isn’t the only feminist film making headlines this month. To celebrate Women’s History Month, venues across Manhattan and Brooklyn are showing female-focused features.


NYC Feminist Film Week at Anthology Film Archives
March 5 to 10, Anthology Film Archives, 32 Second Avenue, East Village.
For the third year running, Anthology Film Archives and Women Who Make Movies are bringing us NYC Feminist Film Week, dedicated to work by female, trans, non-binary, and gender non-conforming filmmakers. According to the fest’s website, “this year’s program focuses on issues surrounding sexuality with a focus on pleasure as a feminist strategy for resistance and community building.” It kicks off Tuesday at 7:30pm with Shakedown, a film about the Los Angeles black lesbian strip club scene.

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Art Shows: Fire Island, Creative Teens, and Political Cakes

Photo via @companygallery on Instagram)

Fire
Opening Wednesday, March 6 at Baby Company, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through April 14. 

Oh, Fire Island. Even if you’ve never been (I haven’t), you’ve probably come across it in one way or another, even if it’s just on your Instagram feed or that time you overheard a group of partygoers dishing about their weekend outing. You have another chance to soak in this getaway through the eyes of another at group exhibition Fire, opening Wednesday at Allen Street’s Baby Company (an offshoot of the nearby Company Gallery). The show, organized by photographer Ryan McNamara, features familiar queer art names like Raúl de Nieves, Kia Labeija, Wolfgang Tillmans, and Nicole Eisenman, all revealing snapshots of what Fire Island (and by extension, spaces known for being queer sanctuaries) means to them.

Patrick Martinez, Chocolate Cake for the Black Panther Party, 2018, Heavy body acrylic, acrylic, airbrush, and ceramic cake roses on panel with gold mirror plex, 20 x 26 x 3 inches (image via Fort Gansevoort)

That Which We Do Not See
Opening Thursday, March 7 at Fort Gansevoort, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through April 20. 

Artist Patrick Martinez brings something simultaneously sweet and politically-charged to the Meatpacking District gallery Fort Gansevoort this week when he opens his solo show of paintings, multimedia pieces, and neon works. The show, which takes its title from a Martin Luther King quote, is peppered with notable figures from modern history, from author Rebecca Solnit to Malcolm X and James Baldwin. These faces, along with other iconography like the Black Panther Party’s panther image, are emblazoned on cakes in remarkable mixed media paintings that truly look edible—their decadence hints at portrait painting’s history of elevating those who could afford to commission one. In addition to the cakes, a selection of paintings of Los Angeles’s changing landscape and text-based neon sculptures will also be on view.

(image via Sonder Exhibition)

Sonder iii
Opening Friday, March 8 at 198 Allen Street, 6 pm to 10 pm. On view through March 10. 

In many instances, going to see art means going to see the work of older people, whether that be artists who made work decades or centuries ago or contemporary greats who have been in the art world for years. But exhibition series Sonder, returning to the Lower East Side for a third year, only shows work by young people. No, not people who are in their mid/late twenties. It’s curated by teenagers, and features work by teenagers who create in multiple genres, who are both local to NYC and based around the globe. When I think about what I was doing when I was a teen, it definitely wasn’t showing art in a New York City gallery, so this is your chance to get a peek at those paving the way for the future of art. I can only wonder if, in light of all the news, there’ll be some Momo-themed art…

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Death By Audio Arcade Seeks Permanent Quarters

(Photos courtesy of DBA Arcade)

When Death By Audio succumbed to Death By Vice, New York City lost a beloved concert space and scene, but it also lost a weird little arcade by the bar and merch table, where you could play independent video games in handmade cabinets. The DBA Arcade, as the installation has been known as, has been wandering the city in various art spaces since Death By Audio shut down, but there’s now an effort to give the games a permanent home in Bushwick.

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Dutch Artists Have Created a Warped Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory in Red Hook

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

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An enormous, alternative version of life at the dawn of industrial revolution was unveiled in Red Hook over the weekend, a world that includes a human settlement within a blast furnace, massive, machinelike human sperms and eggs (that double as furniture), and a gigantic, weirdly playful pendulum clock ticking and tolling all of our lives away. It’s almost as grim as it sounds, but there’s enough sly humor in the renderings to make your visit a not-so-depressing one.

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Your Spring Break Plans? Harmony Korine Forever

When Chicago’s Music Box Theatre announced that it would be hosting a Harmony Korine retrospective, you knew New York City would have to respond. After all, it was while he was an NYU student that Korine got his big break, when Larry Clark tapped him to write that enduring classic, Kids. Sure enough, Metrograph has picked up the gauntlet and just announced its own retrospective dedicated to the director they describe as “the kickflipping skate rat Rimbaud of Washington Square Park.”

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Performance Picks: Living Dolls, Coding Controversy, and More

THURSDAY

(flyer via Eventbrite)

Quitters
Thursday, February 28 at C’mon Everybody, 8 pm: $8 advance, $10 doors 

It could be argued that February is a quitter. All the other months stretch on for 30 or 31 days, while February stops short. It gives up. And then, suddenly, it’s March, and you’re left wondering why rent costs the same for 28 days as it does for 31. Celebrate the last day of this short month tonight at Quitters, a comedy show hosted by Sam Corbin and Ian Goldstein that embraces failure in all its forms, particularly the funny ones. This time, they’re welcoming guests Karen Chee, Brett Davis, Marcia Belsky, and Matt Buechele to the stage, and audience members have the chance to confess their own memorable moment of quitting for a chance to win a free drink. Keep Reading »