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Knickerbocker Village Just Scored $1.46M in Sandy Relief

(Photo: Mary Reinholz)

(Photo: Mary Reinholz)

Only a few short weeks after both tenants and public officials expressed mounting frustration over delays in disaster relief funds to help Knickerbocker Village recover from Sandy’s onslaught a year ago, the city announced today that it would provide $1.46 million in federal money from the NYC Build It Back program to finance the first phase of repairs. Keep Reading »

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Robert James Is Strapping On His Cowboy Boots and Walking Away From Bedford

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

By Robert James has been outfitting dapper dudes on Bedford Ave since December of 2012, but time’s up for the pop-up shop. “We’ll be moving just around the corner on Grand, between Bedford and Driggs. So we’re still staying in the neighborhood,” said a clerk who added that a lease was being negotiated (according to a sign in the window, the new store will open Nov. 15).
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Three Kings Tattoo Was This Detroit Native’s Gateway to Brooklyn

(Photo: Ebru Yildiz)

(Photo: Ebru Yildiz)

Six years ago, Mike McNelis became a regular at Three Kings tattoo parlor by playing softball just as much as by getting inked. Originally from Detroit, McNelis works at Benjamin Moore Paints, helping contractors, architects, and designers find the best paint for their needs. The 37-year-old got into the paint game 15 years ago while putting himself through school at the University of Michigan and working for a painting contractor. After getting the itch to move, he bounced from Detroit to New Haven and then over to New York.
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Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Andrew WK But Were Too Busy Partying to Ask

Last night musician and party messiah Andrew WK stopped into the Newsroom for a free-form discussion about sports, depression and, of course, partying. He also told us a bit about his forthcoming book, The Party Bible, describing it as “a handbook, a guidebook, a game book — it’s an offering and it’s not a story and that’s why it’s really hard to write, because I have to try to make it really good.” (Just how hard is it to write? Check out the trailer). Above, watch the full q&a — and below, read some select thoughts about channeling Joey Ramone, mourning Lou Reed and being himself for Halloween.
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‘He Was a Survivor’: More Musicians and Writers Remember Lou Reed

(Photo: Bonnie Datt)

(Photo: Bonnie Datt)

In his rock and roll heart, Lou Reed was first, a storyteller. His songs were rockhard vignettes of New York street life. There were tales of choices made, good and bad, and remembrances of beauty found in the most unlikely of places. If you lived in the Village in the 70’s, you recognized some of the real players in his songs,  like Rollerena, the ubiquitous drag queen on skates in the elegiac, “Halloween Parade”: “But there ain’t no Hairy and no Virgin Mary / You won’t hear those voice again / And Johnny Rio and Rotten Rita / You’ll never see those faces again.”
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This Rockaway Restaurant Just Bounced Back With a Name That Spells Optimism

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Despite the flip-flops, Chris Miles had clearly come to his restaurant to work. He wore a pair of frayed camouflage shorts and a white “Connelly’s Rockaway Beach 2013” t-shirt that was peppered with holes, slightly exposing his tan skin. As he sat in a dining room full of unwrapped furniture, contractors worked diligently, installing new lights and booths in the bar area. The room was electric with determination.

On Oct. 17, nearly a year to the day that Sandy wiped out his seafood restaurant on Beach 129th Street, Miles and his business partner Bill Keating reopened the business as Pico, a Mexican eatery. It’s been a long time coming. A year ago, Sandy took dead aim at the neighborhood of Belle Habor, and filled Rockaway Seafood Co. with three feet of ocean. The storm’s massive tidal swells caused an electrical short and sparked a fire around 130th Street. While the fire didn’t consume the entirety of Miles’s business, it did kiss the rear of the building, burning out a storage room and a 15 by 20 foot section of the roof.
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Wednesday: Talk to the Label Heads of Fool’s Gold, Captured Tracks + More

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North Brooklyn is rife with indie record labels–as Mike Sniper, the founder of Captured Tracks, told us when we spoke to him about that label’s five-year anniversary, “It’s crazy. I don’t even think people realize how many there are.”

Last month, we attempted to provide a comprehensive listening guide to all the indies in Greenpoint. That’s the what of record label culture in Brooklyn — but what’s the how, and the why? Wednesday, at the Newsroom, we’ll attempt to answer those questions. We’ve organized a panel that includes Sniper; Jeff Bratton, who owns and operates the boutique pop label Cascine; Adam Farrell, the creative director for Loma Vista and previously the marketing and creative director for Beggars Group; and Nick Catchdubs, the co-founder of the indie hip-hop label Fool’s Gold.We’ll see you Wednesday at 7 p.m., at 155 Grand Street, off of Bedford Ave, in Williamsburg. As always, the event is free.

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When Bellevue Had to Evacuate Its Criminally Insane

Water gushing out of a pump during Bellevue's evacuation on Nov. 1. (Photo: Sheri Fink)

Water gushing out of a pump during Bellevue’s evacuation on Nov. 1. (Photo: Sheri Fink)

Four days after Hurricane Sandy, Bellevue Hospital was without power and running water and people were starting to panic. “It’s Bellevue, we’re used to crisis,” says Dr. Elizabeth Ford, “but this was different. I don’t think I’ve ever panicked in my life but I was starting to worry that we wouldn’t get out.”

As director of forensic psychiatry at the Kips Bay hospital, Dr. Ford oversees criminals who suffer from major psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and usually psychosis. The majority come from Rikers Island when they’re suffering from a medical complication.
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Sandy Really Rang Their Bell, But These Coney Island Carnies Are Standing Tall

Jeff Fish and Monica Ghee in front of the Hi-Striker. (Photo: Jessica)

Jeff Fish and Monica Ghee in front of the Hi-Striker. (Photo: Jessica Militare)

Monica Ghee keeps an apartment on the Lower East Side, but during the summer you’ll find her in the shadow of the Wonder Wheel in her native Coney Island, where for over 40 years she has operated the Hi~Striker, a test-your-strength game invented in the early 1900s. Patrons whack a mallet against a base, propelling a dinger up a 17-foot, yellow steel tower. Ghee has aptly labeled each checkpoint — “Sad Sack” at the lowly level seven, and “Oy Vey” at the close-but-no-cigar level 13.
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After Sandy, Jazz Musicians Really Banded Together

BruceMackIn the days after Hurricane Sandy darkened the Lower East Side, an old man played horn inside his dark, cold apartment, hungry for his favorite food: chicken. Then, unexpectedly, knuckles rapped at his door. It was four volunteers from the Jazz Foundation of America, and they had warm food and clothing.

Tears welled up in the man’s eyes. “Who are you? And, I love you,” he said.
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Sunny’s and Steve’s Are Back, But Red Hook Is Still Smarting From Sandy

The new location of Steve's Key Lime Pies.

The new location of Steve’s Key Lime Pies.

Steve Tarpin remembers the night that Hurricane Sandy destroyed his beloved Red Hook bakery, Steve’s Authentic Key Lime Pies. “By 6 p.m. the water was lapping up at my feet,” he recalls. “And we were still three hours away from high tide… I came back around 2:30 a.m., and had to drive through a fair bit of water. Took a quick look and realized there was absolutely nothing I could do. Came back in the morning, we were about three feet underwater.”
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Schumer On Sandy Aid: ‘The First Year Was Too Slow’

(Photo: Mary Reinholz)

(Photo: Mary Reinholz)

A day before Hurricane Sandy’s first anniversary, Mayor Bloomberg showed up at New York University flanked by aides, a congressional delegation and HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, all of them there to announce a fresh infusion of $1.34 billion in federal funds to help rebuild homes, businesses and infrastructure damaged in New York City by its worst natural disaster. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development had already provided the city with more than $1.7 billion earlier this year, a mere pittance compared to the enormity of Sandy’s devastation across five states on the Eastern seaboard.
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