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Ferry Good Deal: Free Greenpoint Commutes (and Coffee and Donuts!) This Week

I cringed when I saw the cover of Taylor Swift’s new album soiling the pristine brown of a UPS truck this morning. But not all branding is evil. Take those trippy Stranger Things buses rolling around town. And this! Tuesday through Thursday of this week, there’ll be free, non-stop ferry service between Greenpoint and downtown Manhattan, with gratis coffee, donuts and popcorn to boot.

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Art This Week: Sculptural Decay, Immigrant Portraits, Post-Apocalyptic Paintings

(image courtesy of Derek Eller Gallery)

Dawn of the Looney Tune
Opening Thursday, November 16 at Derek Eller Gallery, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through December 23.

Not all sculptures involve components like carrots and bread, but Michelle Segre’s sculptures certainly do. You can see them this Thursday at LES space Derek Eller Gallery, when her latest exhibition opens. As these works often involve organic matter such as the aforementioned carrots and bread, and gallery shows are often on view for quite some time, it is almost guaranteed that Segre’s work will subtly change as time goes by. More specifically, that organic matter is probably going to get mushy. Or grow fur. Or change colors. Either way, it will shift. And you will get a healthy reminder that like it or not, we are all slowly but surely decaying. Happy Monday! Keep Reading »

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Obama Documentary Opens DOC NYC One Year After Trump’s Election

Obama during a meeting with Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn in New York, September 2014. From left: Ben Rhodes, Samantha Power, and John Kerry.
(Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)

Watching The Final Year is a little bit like time traveling. The film, which opened the DOC NYC Film Festival last night, charts the last year of the Obama administration, following the president and his foreign policy team, including then-Secretary of State John Kerry, U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power and Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes, as they navigate their final projects in office. The film was accorded the honor of opening this year’s DOC NYC, which runs through Nov. 16.

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Scorsese Transforms the LES Into ’70s Little Italy, For The Irishman

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

This week Lower East Side hipsters may fret that the neighborhood’s invasion of piercing salons and beard-trimming shops has come to an end. Storefronts on Orchard and Broome Streets sport signs reminiscent of 1970s Little Italy. Signs for E. Rossi’s Italy Music & Book Co., Vitale Funeral Home, Hester Discount Hardware and others have popped up, seeming to herald a comeback for the mom-and-pop shops the man-bun crowd has shunned.

But don’t worry, the shops will be gone soon. The signs are props for the filming of The Irishman, the upcoming Netflix film that examines the disappearance of union boss Jimmy Hoffa in 1975. The flick stars mob drama heavyweights Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Harvey Keitel and Joe Pesci. It reunites De Niro and Keitel with Martin Scorsese, who directed the pair in another LES drama, 1973’s Mean Streets.

Based on the 2003 book I Heard You Paint Houses by Charles Brandt, The Irishman marks Scorsese’s long-awaited return to the gangster genre. Shooting began here in August and will continue through December, just in time for SantaCon to arrive.

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Derrick Adams Stays Focused On ‘Triumphant Moments’ in New Art Show

(Photos: Adam Lehrer, unless noted)

Though he’s been a prominent artist for far too long to be saddled with labels like “meteoric rise,” it’s hard to fully convey just how massive a year 2017 was for the New York-based multimedia artist Derrick Adams. Since the beginning of the year, Adams has been the subject of a solo exhibition at Rhona Hoffman Gallery, represented Tilton Gallery at the 2017 Independent Art Fair, held a solo exhibition at the California American Art Museum, and has produced two sprawling institutional projects.

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Thank You, Come Again? Hari Kondabolu Explores ‘The Problem With Apu’

(Photo: truTV)

In the upcoming documentary The Problem with Apu, Brooklyn-based comic Hari Kondabolu explores what happens when a beloved cartoon character is also an offensive caricature for millions of people. The effect of the The Simpsons’ Apu Nahasapeemapetilon – voiced by Hank Azaria – was an ever-present reminder for many South Asians growing up in the United States of the lack of representation and power they held in the entertainment industry and popular media, Kondabolu says in the documentary he hosts and produced for truTV. Without other Indian characters with depth and substance in the media to challenge the stereotype, Apu’s distinct accent and best known line – “Thank you, come again” – became the basis of South Asian characters in American media for years afterwards.

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Russ & Daughters Shows Off Its Future Brooklyn Outpost, Opening Early Next Year

The Russ & Daughters space. (Photo: Razi Syed)

Back in February, Russ & Daughters announced that it was opening a multipurpose space in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, in a World War II-era building that’s undergoing a $185 million renovation. Today, we got to tour the construction site with Mayor Bill de Blasio and Niki Russ Federman, a fourth generation co-owner of the beloved Lower East Side appetizing shop.

“Russ & Daughters has been an anchor on the Lower East Side of New York for 100 years,” said Russ Federman, “where my great-grandfather stood on the streets of the Lower East Side with a barrel of herring so he could eventually open up a store. So we’ve been fully meshed in the Lower East Side and the Navy Yard feels like another amazing community that we’re going to be a part of. There’s this incredible synergy of food-makers, designers, furniture craftsman, roboticists.”

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Unwrapping a New York Mystery: The Fluctuating Deli Sandwich Price

(Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine)

What I meant to say was, “Lettuce?! Who puts lettuce on a bagel?” But what I said instead was, “Sure.” That’s when I learned about a nefarious subterfuge being perpetrated on bagel lovers at deli counters across New York City.

I live on bagels. Compared to cumbersome, jaw-breaking rolls or heroes, bagels are a tidy, trusty, mouth-fitting snack. Add lettuce to the bun, any bun, and the sandwich becomes juicier, fresher. Add it to a bagel, and a decent snack is ruined. It’s a tasteless thing to do.

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Hear Jonathan Lethem Talk, Lee Ranaldo Play at Premiere of Sonic Youther Doc

Doc NYC kicks off today, and there are still tickets left to one of the documentary festival’s highlights: the New York City premiere of a new doc about Sonic Youth singer-strummer Lee Ranaldo. The film, HELLO HELLO HELLO : LEE RANALDO : ELECTRIC TRIM, offers an eye into the recording of Ranaldo’s recently released solo album, Electric Trim, showing how Ranaldo collaborated with author Jonathan Lethem on some of the lyrics.

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Battered Big Bird Shows PETA Isn’t Down With Canada Goose

A giant bloodied goose was spotted outside of the Canada Goose store on Wooster Street shortly after noon on Wednesday. This was, of course, just a costume. The disgusting eight-foot-tall creature, with bulging eyes and exposed flesh, stood with a group of protesters from PETA, who gathered in the wake of undercover footage released by the animal rights organization last week. The footage was allegedly taken from a slaughterhouse that supplies Canada Goose’s down, the fine layer of feathers the clothing company uses in their luxury garments.

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