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Art This Week: City Collages, Uyghur Portraits, and 2 Shows in 1

John Driscoll (image via Fridman Gallery / Facebook)

Slight Perturbations / The Weight of Things
Opening Wednesday, January 16 at Fridman Gallery, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through February 13.

Fridman Gallery’s new space on Bowery has two levels, upper and lower. Fittingly, there will be two exhibitions opening there this Wednesday: a show of of interactive sound sculptures by John Driscoll in the upper space, and a two-channel video installation by Dana Levy centered around the Palace of Versailles in the lower space. Driscoll’s sculptures resemble hodgepodge collections of found objects or avant-garde furniture pieces crossed with a science fair, but they’re much more than something to puzzle over: they contain minuscule microphones and speakers, and a “reflective foil” that creates sound with help from whatever objects are nearby. And though it’s in the lower level, Levy’s video work deals with the upper crust of Versailles, depicting the palace’s contents steadily crumbling due to an earthquake. Keep Reading »

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Immersive Theater Invites You to Solve a Mystery With the Help of a Pyschopomp

(Photos: Zach Filkoff)

Thrill-seekers rejoice! There’s a new high-stakes psychological immersive play in town, and the subject is none other than death and mortality. The Mortality Machine, by Sinking Ship Creations, takes place in a Canal Street basement where, as the story goes, five people died in 2014 as a consequence of a botched medical experiment. Soon after, the facility was closed off and the evidence was buried under countless legal documents. Five years later, a lawyer manages to get access to the basement, which sets the story in motion as participants investigate what exactly happened.

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Immersive Musical OSCAR at the Crown Promises to Be a Wilde Ride

(Photos: Ted Alcorn)

On a recent afternoon at 3 Dollar Bill in East Williamsburg, a group of performers brainstormed ways to involve the audience in their upcoming site-specific show. “Play Truth or Dare with them?” suggested one. “Make them react to specific musical and verbal cues?” echoed another. “Play trivia: drunk people love trivia!” interjected a third.

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Another Sex Toy Company Says MTA Advertising Jerked Them Around

(image courtesy of Dame Products)

These days, trains are delayed often enough for you to get a good look at whatever advertisements emblazon the subway walls. You might see ads for luxury scrubs or the city’s $15 minimum wage rollout, or perhaps ones for breast augmentation, birth control, or pitches for erectile dysfunction meds featuring limp cacti or simply the words “erectile dysfunction meds.” But you won’t be seeing ads for sex toys, as Dame Products has become the second sex toy company to have their ads considered and subsequently rejected by the MTA. Keep Reading »

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Grilled ‘Rhode Island-Style’ Pizza Has Come to New York… or Has It?

(Photo: Melissa Hom for NY Mag)

New York City is getting less and less jingoistic where pizza is concerned. First we got St. Louis-style pizza in 2012 with Speedy Romeo, then “Wisconsin-style” that same year with Nicoletta, respectable Chicago-style with Emmett’s in 2014, and, of course, Detroit-style with Emmy Squared in 2016. If you thought the next carpetbagging crust would be Connecticut’s famed apizza (shoutout to Frank Pepe!), you were wrong. Instead we get… Rhode Island-style?

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Performance Picks: Exponential Festival, Comedy, and Sex Work

(image via Exponential Festival / Facebook)

The Exponential Festival
Now through February 2 at various venues, various times: $20

The Exponential Festival is a little different from the many theater festivals setting up shop in venues across the city this month. It’s exclusively based in Brooklyn, the material it champions is a little weirder and genre-expansive than what you might typically think of as “theater,” and it runs longer, which means both more shows (a dizzying array, really) and more chances to see them. Some highlights include a new short play by Athena playwright Gracie Gardner, a double bill of comedy from Justin Linville and David Perez, a play based on the Talmud and Kung-Fu films, a dystopian psychosexual musical with a disco soundtrack, an intimate show involving one audience member and one performer, and A Doll’s House, Part 3.

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After ‘Living Illegally,’ Rapper Capital Ode Can Now Rep His Roots

(Courtesy of Capital Ode)

Among dozens of CDs, birthday cards, and posters, a few hats hang on Capital Ode’s Far Rockaway bedroom wall. “Every single place that I’ve been in really contributed to who I am in some way,” says the rapper and DJ, pointing to a few hats that stand out to him. “There’s a Toronto [Maple Leafs] hat up there, there’s a Marlins hat up there – Florida Marlins, not the Miami Marlins.”

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Art This Week: Traumatized Clowns and Reducing Food Waste

Joel Osteen (Jessie Pierrot) part 1, 2018
Single Channel Video
00:31:28

Holy Fools
Opening Wednesday, January 9 at Rubber Factory, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through February 3.

Clowns are perhaps one of the most polarizing figures on this green earth. Some people have a literal phobia of them, some find them distasteful, some chuckle at them, some employ them, some become them, and some make art about them. One of the art world’s more notable clown-based endeavors is Bruce Nauman’s 1987 piece Clown Torture, featuring a slew of video displays portraying “an absurd misadventure of a clown” that’s both morbid and humorous. Over three decades later, artist Ondine Viñao is putting her own spin on this work in an exhibition at Rubber Factory, recruiting four all-female clownish performers to stage their own mishaps, mixing both trauma and folly. Keep Reading »

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With L Shutdown Averted, Debate Over All Those Extra Buses and Bikes

(@sloaneklevin on Instagram)

Since Governor Cuomo announced last week that the MTA would scrap its total L-train shutdown in favor of a new plan involving the closure of just one tunnel at a time on nights and weekends, the mood has been a little bit celebratory and little bit WTF. Among other things, New Yorkers who had been ready to see their commutes descend into stygian chaos are now wondering what will happen to all those promised ferries, buses, and bike lines. Some still want ’em, others most definitely don’t.

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Governors Ball Drops 2019 Lineup: Strokes n’ Folks

(Photo: Daniel Leinweber – Razberry Photography)

After a rainy installment last summer, Governors Ball is back with its 2019 lineup. Headlining the three-day food-and-music fest on Randall’s Island this year: Tyler, the Creator gets top billing on Friday, May 31; Florence + the Machine will close things out on Saturday; and the Strokes, who last played the Ball in 2016, will wrap up the whole shebang on Sunday.

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At Kellogg’s Diner, Mediterranean Migrants Got a Piece of the Pie

Kellogg’s Diner, November 2018.

The idea of a good life for Irene Siderakis was being able to stay at home with her four children. She got to live that dream until her husband, Christos, died suddenly in April, leaving her to run the 24-hour Williamsburg diner they owned together. Life has a way of throwing things at you, she told me one November afternoon, standing behind the counter. Clad in black, she wore no adornments, save a pair of pearl earrings, and teared up as she recounted Chris’ burial at the Antonopoulos funeral home in Astoria, where the line of mourners snaked around the block. Irene had no time to grieve. Someone needed to take the reins at Kellogg’s, one of the oldest and busiest diners in Brooklyn.

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