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This Japanese Brand Is Now Selling $111 Rage Against Machine Hoodies On the LES

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

If you’re walking down Orchard Street on the Lower East Side, you’ll see some laundromats, coat shops and a corset store — all of which look like they very much belong on the Lower East Side (kinda sketchy, a little dirty, but charismatic in the way Williamsburg pretends to be). If you continue your walk down Orchard, you’ll notice that one shop doesn’t quite seem to fit.

It might be because of the crystal-like sign or perhaps it’s the posh display of mannequins, but Snidel sticks out the way boyfriends do at a Shawn Mendes concerts — the presence is cute and all, but does it really belong?

The answer lies within the store’s major partnership, and it’s prominently displayed on a number of graphic tees. Because, mixed in between corduroy non-gendered collared shirts costing $130 and one-size-fits-all dresses (size F), there are Rage Against the Machine t-shirts, sweatshirts and iPhone cases. 

That’s right. The ’90s woke rap-metal group is selling merch at a fashionable Japanese store in its first U.S location. To clarify, the rock band did not pluck tour shirts and put them on a rack amongst quality fabrics. The partnership allows for RATM to slither its way onto objectively cool cuts and designs.

It’s basically like those $100 Wham! tees at Nordstrom. You wouldn’t go into a store looking for them, but somehow the atmosphere inside filled with potential is drawing you to the cash register, Wham! shirt (in this case, RATM shirt) in hand.

Born in Tokyo’s uber-hip Harajuku neighborhood in 2005, Snidel made a list of 10 Fashion Brands That Japanese People Love; Culture Trip wrote that the brand “focuses on making stylish but feminine silhouettes popular with women in their twenties and thirties.” Perhaps Rage Against the Machine found the trendy Japanese brand before the rest of America, or perhaps their management team got extremely lucky in pitching to Snidel before it opened in New York. Regardless, the store inside seems like it could find success in the midst of the LES.

Inside, you won’t hear Zach de la Rocha snarling the lyrics to “No Shelter”: “Empty ya pockets, son, they got you thinkin’ that / What ya need is what they selling / Make you think that buying is rebelling.” Instead Harry Styles and Taylor Swift played back-to-back, as if the Top-40 Gods were smiling upon the human making the playlist. As for the prices, they aren’t empty-ya-pockets expensive (by New York standards, anyway).

There’s a wide range of unisex tops, as well as skirts and checkered pants, typically ranging from $50 to $150. (The RATM hoodie is $111). And, for a store that opened in the U.S. two weeks ago, the clothes seem to go with fall fashion in the states — there’s an abundance of oversized sweaters, camel coats, knee-high boots and faux-fur jackets.

And, if that’s not enough to convince you to pop in, there’s one more partnership the brand has. The partnership perhaps makes even more Lower-East-Side sense than RATM.

It’s Hello Kitty.

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The L Shutdown Is ‘Not Going to Be Really Pleasant,’ Business Owners Are Told

(Photos: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

When I got off the L train at Bedford Avenue a little after 9 am this morning, the platform was surprisingly empty. This may foreshadow what’s in store for North Brooklyn when the 15-month shutdown of the L train between Bedford and 8th Avenue begins on April 27, just five months from now. Less people means less money-spending; a 2017 survey estimated 40% of small businesses expected to lose up to half their business. To prepare, the L Train Coalition held the first of what will be monthly informational meetings aimed at business owners along the L line.

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Nutella Nuts Flock to Cafe’s Opening to Check Out the Spread

(Photos: Summer Cartwright)

If you’ve ever wanted to physically walk into a jar of Nutella, you now can at its new cafe at 116 University Place.

Though what you’ll walk into isn’t physically a thick hazelnut-chocolate compote, what you’ll ingest surely will be. The menu is all about the cult classic spread — crepes are filled with it, espresso is combined into it and whipped cream is colored just like it.

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Village ‘Bagel Zone’ Expands

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

Have you noticed this outside of Tompkins Square Bagels on Second Avenue? A crafty carb lover has modified a road-work sign to indicate a “bagel zone.” The weird thing is that Tompkins Square Bagels is behind said bagel zone, not ahead of it. Is someone trying to send bikers to Black Seed, a block south over on First Avenue?

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Yoga-Boxing Entrepreneur Olivia Young Brings Out Her Yin-Yang With an Expanded Studio

Olivia Young (Photo courtesy of Box + Flow)

It’s November 1, the two-year anniversary of box + flow, and 32-year old founder Olivia Young is feeling reflective. “I woke up from a nightmare this morning,” she says. “I was crying right before you got here.”

Young is unapologetically herself, and is arrestingly honest. She’s the kind of person you trust immediately. She hands me a beer from the mini-fridge beside her desk, and we cheers to the second anniversary of box + flow and to my own personal growth, in a disclosure I will share with her but not with the internet. Keep Reading »

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Art This Week: A Stonewall Veteran, Violent Clothing, and More

Thomas Lanigan Schmidt. Lollipop Knick Knack (Let’s Talk About You), c. 1968-69. Foil, printed material, linoleum, glitter, staples, Magic marker, found objects and other media

Tenemental (With Sighs Too Deep For Words)
Opening Friday, November 16 at HOWL! Happening, 6 pm to 9 pm. On view through December 19.

The year 2019 (which isn’t too far away) will mark the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, a pivotal and much-debated moment in LGBTQ history. While 50 years is a fairly long time ago, some people who were present on that fateful day are still alive and kicking today, including the artist Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt, who will be exhibiting a collection of art and ephemera at HOWL! Happening right before Stonewall’s 50th. Lanigan-Schmidt’s work is kitschy and eye-catching, using common-yet-ostentatious materials like foil, glitter, and colorful plastic wrap. Broken down into individual parts, his materials may appear to some as trash, but assembled into these creations they take on a new, queer life full of promise. Keep Reading »

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The Latest Wes Anderson Art Show Was One for the Dogs

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

It’s been three years since the folks at Spoke Art produced an art show dedicated to Wes Anderson, so why not host another? The latest one, which took place over the weekend at Parasol Projects on the Bowery, featured over 100 artists paying homage to the director’s latest, Isle of Dogs.

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