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This Weekend, Score A Free Snow Cone And Maybe Free Full Moon Fest Tickets

(image courtesy of Fancy PR)

(image courtesy of Fancy PR)

If you haven’t noticed, it’s been hot. Sweet and icy treats can be a good way to combat this, but let’s face it. Ice cream, milkshakes, and smoothies can get expensive. Air conditioning is pricey too, and you can only hang out in chilly coffee shops for so long until you start to get grumpy stares.

Starting this Friday until August 6, the folks at music fest Full Moon Festival will be going around to various locations in the city, doling out free (yes, that’s right) snow cones. Revel in the sweet nostalgia of this simple frozen treat and and try to avoid brain freeze from crunching on ice too quickly as you seek refuge from sweat in what is really just syrup poured onto literal ice. Hey, it’s tasty. As a way of spicing up the typical snow cone fare, they’re offering a special “Blue Moon” flavor (no, not the beer) which combines pineapple and blueberry in a refreshing blend.

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War Porn, Pottermania Redux, and Still More Talks and Readings

(Photo: Courtesy of Pete's Candy Store)

(Photo: Courtesy of Pete’s Candy Store)

TUESDAY

Cool as F••k Reading Series
July 26, 7:30pm at Pete’s Candy Store, 709 Lorimer Street at Richardson Street, Williamsburg.
Pete’s Candy Store holds its monthly “Cool as F**k” reading series every fourth Tuesday. It’s billed as a show that combines stand-up and musical performances with a more traditional reading series format, where literary madness is accompanied by a live band and a number of surprise appearances. The series is hosted by Bill Lessard (McSweeney’s, NPR, Prelude) and Bud Smith (The Rumpus, Hobart, Vol. 1 Brooklyn), and includes a number of notable writers and musicians who appear alongside a “special guest” who will be profiled in a separate podcast.

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The Absurd Comedy Collective Says Here’s a Funny Idea: Inclusivity

(photo courtesy of Rachel Kaly)

(photo courtesy of Rachel Kaly)

It’s true that comedy, especially lately, has deviated somewhat from the norm of white men standing onstage telling jokes about themselves and usually at the expense of others. But there aren’t always places one can go to be away from all this, to safely cultivate one’s humor without fear of condescension or competition. A new pop-up comedy group called the Absurd Comedy Collective seeks to change that, offering free workshops, open mics, and shows that “create space for women-identifying people of color, and all genderqueer, nonbinary, and trans people.”

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Bushwick Woman Raped in Her Home; Brooklyn Bowl Gets a New Owner

A 29-year-old woman was tied up, raped and robbed by an intruder early Monday morning in her Bushwick apartment. [ABC 7]

Last night in Bushwick’s Maria Hernandez Park, police tasered a suicidal man armed with multiple knives, including swords and a machete, before taking him into custody for a psychiatric evaluation. [DNA Info]

On the Lower East Side, forthcoming 60-story-plus apartment buildings are bound for Cherry and South Streets. [Bowery Boogie]

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New York, I Love You and Panorama Festival Is a New Reason Why

Photo: Daniel Leinweber | Razberry Photography

Arcade Fire’s Bowie tribute. (Photo: Daniel Leinweber | Razberry Photography)

After a fair amount of hype that included some surprise LCD Soundsystem shows at Webster Hall, the organizers of Coachella pulled off their first ever Panorama Festival in New York City. Among the many highlights: Brooklyn’s own Here We Go Magic opening one of the fest’s three stages, Major Lazer’s super high-energy set, Sufjan Stevens’s colorful stage show, a set from rising Brooklyn DJ Jai Wolf, and a performance by Sia during which Kristin Wiig, Paul Dano, Gaby Hoffmann, and other celebs pantomimed on massive screens wrapping the stage. Oh, and let’s not forget Arcade Fire’s tribute to David Bowie, involving a second-line through the crowd as the Preservation Hall Jazz Brand helped out with “Heroes,” “Suffragette City” and “Rebel Rebel.”

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Inside the Williamsburg Whole Foods, Opening Tomorrow

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa Rollenhagen

Luisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa RollenhagenLuisa Rollenhagen

Step aside, asparagus water: in Williamsburg, the mecca of organic, sort-of-unnecessary, and often prohibitively expensive foodstuffs is planning to do things a little differently. The supermarket giant, which will open its newest Brooklyn location on Tuesday, July 26, will include a food hall packed with local flavor: OddFellows Ice Cream (which will have a stand outside), an outpost of No. 7 Restaurant, Luke’s Lobster’s grilled tail cart, Roberta’s pastries, and East Coast Poke will all be represented at the store, as well as a “traditional Jewish delicatessen” dubbed N4, which is Whole Food’s way of “paying homage to Williamsburg’s storied roots.”

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Surprise: The L Train Shutdown Has Spurred a Few Thoughts on Twitter

(Photo: Marcin Wichary/Flickr, via New York magazine)

(Photo: Marcin Wichary/Flickr, via New York magazine)

If you haven’t already seen the bearded doomsayers wandering the streets with the “The End Is Nigh” written on sandwich boards in fine cursive, then despair, ye fool: the L Train is shutting down.

Starting in January of 2019, the consistently packed subway line will stop running between Brooklyn and Manhattan for at least 18 months. During that time, the MTA will be repairing damage from flooding during Superstorm Sandy in the Canarsie Tunnel, which trains use to get between Brooklyn and Manhattan.

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Art Gangs Had Rifts on Rafts at the Battle For Mau Mau Island

Pugil-stick jousting, with organizer Orien McNeill in white coat. (All photos: Nick McManus)

One of the city’s most delightful and yet more obscure summer traditions popped off in Rockaway again this year, with the Battle for Mau Mau Island once again pitting teams of costumed “art gangs” against each other on a flotilla of makeshit rafts. Photographer Nick McManus, a member of team Squiggles, was on Jamaica Bay to capture the madness of the event’s fifth year, taking photos from a two-man kayak abreast of the action. He tells us, “Challenges such as the pictured pugil-stick jousting were held till sundown when everyuone went to a nearby campsite to party all night.”

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MTA Opts For 18-Month L Shutdown; Body Found in McCarren Park

After much debate about how best to repair Sandy damage, the MTA has decided to completely shut down L service in Manhattan and between Manhattan and Brooklyn for a year and a half, starting in January of 2019. [NY Times]

Early yesterday morning, an unconscious female was pronounced dead in McCarren Park. [Pix 11]

A man sustained head trauma and a woman emerged with back and neck injuries after they crashed the stolen motorcycle they were riding in Williamsburg yesterday morning. [NY Daily News]

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Suffragette City Is A DIY Feminist Publication Serving Zine Realness With Magazine Style

Suffragette City Issue #1 (courtesy of Gwynn Galitzer)

Suffragette City Issue #1 (courtesy of Gwynn Galitzer)

It’s not just a Bowie song. Suffragette City, a new intersectional feminist zine, aims to marry the DIY spirit of zines with the production value of a full-fledged magazine. Spearheaded by editor-in-chief and graphic designer Gwynn Galitzer, Suffragette City smartly combines the best of two worlds, resulting in an independently-produced yearly publication that has entrancing visuals and spirited content, like essays on gender activism, interviews with witches, styled photo spreads, poetry, hand-drawn lettering, comics, and more.

As they gear up to release their second-ever issue, they’ve been throwing monthly fundraising shows that double as parties, and will launch a formal fundraising campaign soon. I sat down with Gwynn, fresh from organizing and styling the zine’s cover photoshoot featuring model Angel Rose, to find out what’s up and what’s next.

Zines are one of the few forms of print media that are relatively thriving at least on a local scale, thanks to shops like Molasses Books and Bluestockings, maker pop-up shops at places like Shwick and Catland, and events such as the Bushwick Art Book and Zine Fair and Brooklyn Zine Fest.

Suffragette City Issue #1 (comic by Lucia Love)

Suffragette City Issue #1 (comic by Lucia Love)

  1. Magazines, on the other hand, are far less prevalent than they once were. Written media and photos within print publications have mostly moved to the internet, which doesn’t allow as much for glossy photo spreads and sharply designed editorial layouts.

“It’s a super DIY zine, but the production level is really high. We do all the fundraising and everything so we can print this in such a high caliber. I love print, I love working on paper, I love collage. I love having a tactile thing. There’s something about having your work physically printed. It communicates to someone else that someone has invested the money to physically publish your work,” she says. “[And] the work deserves it. It’s all done through fundraising, it’s all volunteer-based, it’s all advertisement-free, and it’s clearly expensive to make. ”

Suffragette City Issue #1 (photo: Alannah Farrell)

Suffragette City Issue #1 (photo: Alannah Farrell)

Suffragette City‘s first issue, which was all about hair, came out in 2015. They printed 300 copies and had a kickoff event at Silent Barn, and now sell copies at Bluestockings. The second issue (the theme is Politics) is slated to run the week before Election Day in November. Naturally, there will be an appropriately-themed release party, also at Silent Barn.

The content and people in Suffragette City reflects Galitzer’s multifaceted community; she grew up in the city, studied Fine Arts at SVA, sings in a band, and has spent several years curating and producing art events throughout the city.

“I didn’t just grow up in the city, I went elementary school through college in a five-block radius in Chelsea. It’s a small town,” she says. “I have a lot of my childhood friends in this. [Design Director] Nicole Ruggiero and I [have been] best friends since we were 4 years old, as well as Harley Kinberg who is our illustrator. It’s the first time we’ve been working on a creative project together, it’s been really awesome.”

She got the idea for the zine from the monthly event she helps run with her boyfriend, a workshop-based reading and music series called Having A Whiskey Coke With You that’s now been running for five years.

“I noticed there was a lot of really powerful female-identifying readers, but the events were very male-heavy. Mostly because the reading scene is very male-dominated. I was talking to my boyfriend Jesse, saying that he should do a female-centric [event], and he was like, ‘I think you should do something.”

Suffragette City Issue #1 (painting by Katelan Foisey)

Suffragette City Issue #1 (painting by Katelan Foisey)

Since the reading series was already producing a monthly zine and she grew up doing “music and zines” all throughout high school, Galitzer figured this would be similar, made in the classic DIY Xeroxed style she was used to. She soon realized that the project was moving in a sleeker direction. “All the sudden it started snowballing, the quality of the work was going up and up and up. So I realized I needed to step this up more, I needed to make this high caliber.”

Galitzer works as a graphic designer and concentrated in printmaking at SVA, so she felt strongly that the quality of the publication needed to be up there with the pros. “We printed with one of the industry leaders in the city. Because I’m a graphic design nerd, I want everyone I know who does graphic design to look at it and go, yes, you did it right,” she says. “It was also investing in the people involved. I can’t have everyone put all this work in it and not make it the greatest thing I could possibly do. It felt necessary.”

Though many of the people featured in Suffragette City are people Galitzer knows personally, this does not make for any sort of lapse in legitimacy. Joanne Petit-Frere, who created the wigs and hair sculptures featured in one of several beautiful photo spreads shot by Alannah Farrell, has done work for celebrity clients. “Joanne gets hired a lot for these big deal photoshoots and performers, she’s done hairpieces for Beyoncé and all these crazy music videos, but she doesn’t get billing for it. I thought it was important to give her some spotlight,” says Galitzer.

Suffragette City Issue #1 (hair by Joanne Petit-Frere, photo by Alannah Farrell)

Suffragette City Issue #1 (hair by Joanne Petit-Frere, photo by Alannah Farrell)

The Hair issue also features journalist and nightlife figure Gerry Visco (Galitzer calls her one of her best friends), “gender capitalist” androgynous model Rain Dove, and “masculine-of-center and/or genderqueer” activist Lucy Parks. Notably, Suffragette City features a diverse spread of minds and bodies often absent from the pages of glossy productions. “I’m very adamant that we are really an intersectional thing,” she says. “You can’t say you’re a feminist and not be intersectional. [It’s] definitely not all cis, heterosexual, white women. That’s also not representative of the people I know.” And it’s not just local; they put out a submission call via Twitter for their next issue and got a many responses, including someone currently living in the Philippines.

Suffragette City has been doing fundraising events monthly, and their next one is this Saturday. They’re starting at Williamsburg’s Two Boots Pizza for a “mini zine fair,” where they’ll also have handmade buttons featuring “strong female lead characters from the ‘90s with pizza.” After that, everyone will head over to the Gutter Bar for a rock show of female-fronted bands, including Galitzer’s own band, No Ice. She’s been committed to involving as many women as she can for these events. “If the venue has women on staff, I request they work that night,” she tells me.

mini zines (photo: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

mini zines (photo: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

“It’s not like I have investors or I personally have money. I don’t have any experience with how it’s supposed to work at a magazine. It’s just me. It’s literally run out of my living room,” she says, telling me for their last photoshoot they moved all the furniture in her house and shot everything in the zine in 17 hours. She rented a room for a shoot this time, for her sanity.

Despite the immense work it takes to put out a publication like this, Galitzer shows no signs of stopping, and is considering starting a podcast and making miniature zines with Nicole Ruggiero in addition to the big yearly publication.

“I want more than anything for someone to give it to a 16-year-old girl and have her be like, ‘Yeah!’ And then for her to make a zine,” she says, grinning. “Also, I would like to get enough funding to pay everyone involved. I’d like to raise enough money so that everyone that put in hard work can get paid for it. And it’s going to happen. I have faith. If not for this one, then the next one.”

Suffragette City’s latest fundraiser is happening Saturday, July 23 at The Gutter Bar, 200 N 12th Street, Williamsburg. 8pm. $8. More info here. Visit the zine’s website here.

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I Crashed an RNC Watch Party and Felt Like the Elephant in the Room

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

At the Met Republican Club’s RNC watch party (Photo: Nicole Disser)

A strange man approached me last night at the Metropolitan Republican Club. “Do you know what that is on your hand?” he asked, pointing down to an glass eyeball ring I like to wear. I gulped, ready for anything– after all, people had been belting out things like “Traitor!”, “Treason!”, and, of course, the one that got everybody at the RNC watch party chanting: “Lock her up! Lock her up!”

“I dunno, blood?” I murmured. Thankfully, I don’t think he heard me. “It’s a mati,” he explained. “It’s supposed to ward off the evil eye.” It was a nice sentiment, but I wasn’t so sure it was working.

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Apostrophe NYC Will Host a Pop-Up Subway Show In Bushwick Tonight

A scene from last year's Subway Show (Photo: Courtesy of Apostrophe NYC)

A scene from last year’s Subway Show (Photo: Courtesy of Apostrophe NYC)

Apostrophe NYC is at it again. Three years after brothers Ki and Sei Smith’s Bushwick gallery and event space was shut down, the two have been busy. If the people can’t come to the art, then the art shall come to the people! After some of their most recent covert hijinks at the Whitney (where they’re now banned for life) and at MoMA PS1 in May, the intrepid art duo is planning a pop-up subway show at the Kosciuszko Street stop on the J line.

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