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Musicians Recall Dylan’s First Big Gig and 25 Years of Music History at Gerde’s Folk City

Gerde’s Folk City, on West Fourth Street. (Photo: New York University Archives Photograph Collection)

Greenwich Village in 1960 was ground zero for folk music. Beat poets of the ’50s gave way to folk singers in Village coffee houses like the Gaslight Café and Café Bizarre. Musicians gathered at the Kettle of Fish bar and Izzy Young’s Folklore Center, which sold books, records and instruments.

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Can Hallucinogens Have You Seeing Dollar Signs? Attend ‘The Psychedelics of Money’ to Find Out

Tricia Eastman (Photo: Dana Jonas)

Short on cash or struggling to pay bills? The answer, says Tricia Eastman, may lie in using powerful psychedelics like DMT and Iboga to address internal traumas and expand the mind.

Eastman, a medicine woman who trained in facilitating Iboga and DMT experiences for others at a treatment center in Mexico, will give a talk on money and psychedelics at East Village herb store The Alchemist’s Kitchen.

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Noah Baumbach On The Meyerowitz Stories, a Portrait of a Dysfunctional Family in Which ‘Art Is Religion’

Noah Baumbach, left. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

Have you seen the Noah Baumbach movie about the sons grappling with their father’s divorce and his legacy as an artistic has-been? No, I’m not talking about The Squid and the Whale. I’m talking about Baumbach’s latest movie about this, The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected), which will have its North American premiere at the New York Film Festival on Monday and comes to Netflix Oct. 13.

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The Art of the Prank Unmasks Joey Skaggs, Father of Fake News

In Art of the Prank, set to release on October 9, longtime New Yorker and media hoaxer Joey Skaggs is gearing up to pull off the largest and most demanding hoax of his career.

Long before “fake news” or “alternative facts” had become a part of the public consciousness, Skaggs put together elaborate hoaxes to feed the media, like claiming to run a brothel for dogs or his portable confessional booth, to satirize the media’s gullibility and explore the media’s role in shaping and molding public opinion.

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Performance Picks: Circus, Shots, and A Radical Theater Festival

WEDNESDAY

(flyer via Vital Joint / Facebook)

Ladies Who Ranch
Wednesday, September 27 at Vital Joint, 8:30 pm: $5-10 sliding scale

“Ranch” can mean a lot of things for a lot of people. For some, it may call to mind a country scene, replete with cattle and rope and maybe a tumbleweed. For others, it reminds them of that creamy white dressing you can put on salads or pizza or whatever. Personally I do not like ranch dressing so naturally the title of this show reminds me innately of it and it makes me cringe a little.

However, the Ladies Who Ranch is in fact not a salute to dressing or even cows, it is a night of comedy by a group of women. Specifically, Kelly Cooper, Rachel Kaly, Maya Sharma, Caitlin Dullea, Caroline Yost, and Sophie Zucker, all of whom were frequent performers at the now-closed Annoyance Theater. Plus, special guest Eliza Cossio of The Daily Show will also be gracing the ranch land with her presence. Tonight, you shall see stand-up, sketches, and multimedia performance, and after the sets have concluded there will be an open mic for you to try your hand at something weird and wacky. Keep Reading »

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Graham Collins Stitches Found Paintings To Create Something Bigger Than the Sum of Its Arts

“Unmeltable Antebellum” by Graham Collins.

A few years ago, Graham Collins landed on a GQ list of 10 artists to watch when he bronzed pedestrian items like toothbrushes and potato chips and showed them at Art Basel. Some of those works are now on display at The Journal Gallery, along with others that are substantially more monumental.

“Unmeltable Antebellum” is a striking giant. To create it, Collins took strips and segments of nearly a hundred found paintings and meticulously arranged them and stitched them together. It’s one of many similar pieces, created over several years, that will be on display through Nov. 4 as part of the artist’s latest solo show, “Western Shade.”

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New Museum Tackles Gender in ‘Trigger’ Show

The display Paul Mpagi Sepuya’s photographs. (Photo by Diego Lynch)

The New Museum is taking a deep dive into the role of gender in contemporary art. With an emphasis on the word “contemporary.”

The vast majority of “Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon,” opening today, consists of pieces from after 2010, with a sizable contingent from this year. The exhibit was curated with the goal of creating a snapshot of the current moment of “political upheaval and renewed culture wars,” a seeming reference to the increased prevalence of right-wing populism.

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Rockaway’s Riis Park Beach Bazaar Opens New Off-Season Restaurant, The Dropout

It’s going to be an endless summer in Rockaway. The Riis Park Beach Bazaar is set to unveil its new off-season restaurant. Starting this weekend, The Dropout will take over the Bay 9 pavilion, the beachside spot in Riis Park that last winter was occupied by Rockaway’s “Pizza Nazi”, Whitney Aycock. (The National Park Service gave him the heave-ho over the summer.)

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