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Continental Bar Announces Closing Date of July 1

The corner of Third Avenue and St. Marks Place.
(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

July 1 will be the Continental’s last day after 26 years of pouring shots in the East Village, the bar has announced.

The long-standing dive announced in November that it would be forced to close within a year, as its landlord had plans to redevelop the corner of Third Avenue and St. Marks Place. A couple of adjacent businesses, Papaya King and the McDonald’s, had already closed to make way for a proposed seven-story office building.

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Roberta’s Throws Cold Water On Conspiracy Theorists With Pizzagate Beer

(Photo via Roberta’s Pizzeria on Instagram)

Now that it’s been a little over a year since Roberta’s got sucked into the Pizzagate conspiracy, fans of the East Williamsburg pizzeria can look back and laugh– while pounding a Pizzagate beer. The new pale ale will launch at Roberta’s this Friday, March 2, with a party at their tiki tent.

The batshit brew is a collaboration with LIC Beer Project, and contains “enormous amounts of Citra, Cascade, a touch of Chinook and Columbus,” according to the Queens-based brewers. It’s 5.5% ABV– so, just alcoholic enough to chill you out when you start losing it because “Roberta’s” is an anagram for “aborters.”

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Ovenly’s Owners On Their New Williamsburg Bakery and Creating an ‘Empathetic Economy’ With Cookies

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

Bakery masters and all-around decent human beings Erin Patinkin and Agatha Kulaga take another step forward today in their quest to spread delicious treats and boundless joy to all corners of New York City with the opening of their fourth Ovenly bakeshop, a cute little sliver of a spot in Williamsburg on North 5th near Kent.

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Beers Went Head to Head at This Brooklyn Homebrewers Competition

NYC Beer Week opened with a pop and clink this past weekend, with the First Annual Homebrewers Competition at Randolph Beer in Dumbo, Brooklyn. Contestants were asked to bring 12 oz bottles of their homemade hops, which were tasted by a panel of Randolph’s judges, including beer writer Justin Kennedy. The event was a success, according to Kyle Kensrue, director of operations for Randolph Beer.

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City Life, Bodily Resistance, and More Art This Week

(image via Tina Kim Gallery / Facebook)

Jeong
Opening Wednesday, February 28 at Tina Kim Gallery, 6 pm to 8 pm.

You’re probably familiar with the most common way to write music, with notes on a staff, even if you can’t read music yourself. But did you know there are other ways to do it? One of them, the Korean system Jeongganbo, dates all the way back to the Joseon Dynasty, which began in 1392 and ended much later, in 1910. Rather than using a staff system, it uses a grid system, with each note taking up a square in sequential order. Seoul-based artist Suki Seokyeong Kang was drawn to this geometric composition technique, and has created a series of “visual translations” of Jeonggabo in her new solo show at Chelsea’s Tina Kim Gallery. The show is mostly sculpture based, in a way that attempts to put forth both logic and harmony. Perhaps after exploring, you’ll come away with a subconscious new knowledge of how music can be made. Keep Reading »

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Competitive Winter Picnicking Brought Madcap Costumes and Olympic Snuggling to Prospect Park

winterpicnic-(Photo: Scott Lynch)

winterpicnic-(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

Physically, it’s not really that challenging a sport. Mentally, even less so; in fact the “better” “players” are usually among the most tipsy. And though Competitive Winter Picnicking might not have made it to PyeongChang this Olympiad, the world–or, at least, a few baffled dog walkers–learned yesterday in chilly, drizzly Prospect Park that the game definitely makes for a strange spectacle.

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L Train Shutdown Will Wreak Havoc Without New Bus and Bike Lanes, Traffic Study Says

(Photo courtesy of Buck Ennis)

Thousands of bikers are expected to flood Union Square, and 14th Street will become the country’s busiest bus corridor, when the L train shuts down next year, according to a new study. The MTA and DOT released a traffic analysis yesterday showing just how disruptive the 15-month closure of the Canarsie tunnel will be. Proposed solutions include a two-way bike lane on 13th Street and a busway on 14th Street, and some of them will be implemented as soon as this summer.  Keep Reading »

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Here’s What It Looks Like When People Pie an Artist in the Face

(Photo courtesy of Jason Schmidt)

Jennifer Rubell has been on the receiving end of a pie-five for about nine nights thus far, and she still has 14 more to go. Since Feb. 8, the Meredith Rosen Gallery has been home to Rubell’s Consent, an exhibition of her newest works. Visitors have been invited to admire the artist’s paintings and, while you’re at it, smash a pie into her face.

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Choreographed Memes, Afropunk Spaghetti Westerns, and More Performance Picks

THURSDAY

(flyer via Magical Girl Burlesque / Facebook)

Magical Girl Burlesque Presents: The New Review
Thursday, February 22 at Mayday Space, 8 pm: $5

Out with the old, in with the new, that’s what they say. Or at least, that’s what someone said, sometime, somewhere. Regardless of your opinion on the old, you can see the new coming out in full force at the inclusive troupe Magical Girl Burlesque’s recurring show, The New Review. True to its name, it centers around showcasing both emerging and experienced burlesque performers who have new acts they’d like to workshop for an audience. Think of it as a kind of open mic for burlesque, except the lineup is technically pre-curated and there probably won’t be any white men telling jokes that they (and no one else) think are funny. Keep Reading »

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Placing A Florida Sex Offender Community On the New York Stage

The Cast of Life Jacket Theatre Company’s production of AMERICA IS HARD TO SEE (photo: T. Charles Erickson)

You may be familiar with the fact that registered sex offenders have to appear on an online registry or disclose their criminal status to neighbors or employers. But in Florida, a state deemed “the harshest state for sex offenders,” that’s just a sampling of the restrictions these people deemed the lowest of the low are saddled with post-conviction. When you can’t live within 1,000 feet of places like schools and parks and the world has cast eternal aspersions on you, where can you go? For those in or near the tiny city of Pahokee, Florida, there’s Miracle Village, an isolated community in the midst of the sugarcane, waiting with open arms.

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