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For 108 Years, This Bushwick Church Has Paid Witness to Tragedy and Transformation

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

St. Barbara’s Roman Catholic Church in central Bushwick is one of the only Spanish Mission style churches on the East Coast. (Wikimedia Commons/Jim Henderson)

Since 1909, the generations of working-class immigrants who have worshipped at St. Barbara’s Roman Catholic Church in Bushwick have known their share of hardship. Over the church’s 108-year history, congregants have grieved thousands of deaths, from members lost to the AIDS crisis in the 1980s and ‘90s to victims of the collapse of the World Trade Center twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001.

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The Story of Colonnade Row Before the Blue Men Grouped

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

The imposing façade of 434 Lafayette Street, one of the remaining buildings in the historic Colonnade Row, evokes an earlier, more prosperous time. Its Corinthian columns, tall and grandiose, are wrapped in a protective mesh to prevent disintegration. The marble, extracted in Westchester County and cut by convicts at the Sing Sing correctional facility, continues to decay under the sun.

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From Grand Pianos to Sign Language, a History of Sound at 237 East 23rd Street

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

At the end of the 19th century, the piano factory of Helmuth Kranich and his partner Jacques Bach at 237 East 23rd Street was flourishing. The partners could hardly have known, as they imported exotic woods for the instruments they crafted and took out ads in the local papers, what challenges the coming decades would bring.

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As Farm and Factory, 670 Broadway Was a ‘Rendezvous for the Wealthy Set’

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

At the northeast corner of Broadway and Bond stands a most imperial structure. In 1874, when Brooks Brothers opened its newest location at this address, the New York Times declared 670 Broadway to be “an ornament to the street.” Four years later, the noted architect Rev. Dr. Samuel Osgood called it “the finest business edifice in New York.”

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Jemima Kirke of Girls Talks Painting, Marriage and #MeToo

Kirke with “ShiShi In My Wedding Dress,” 2017. (photo: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

You may know her as the free-spirited Jessa in oft-discussed HBO show Girls, but Jemima Kirke considers herself more painter than actor. Her third solo exhibition, The Ceremony, is currently on view at Lower East Side gallery Sargent’s Daughters. A series of portraits depicting both friends and fictional women in their wedding dresses, the show seeks to interrogate why women still partake in this “antiquated ceremony.” A few days after the opening, we met with Kirke at the gallery to talk marriage, the #metoo movement, and recent controversy involving her castmate Lena Dunham.
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Off of Tompkins Square Park, a Site of Women’s Tragedy and Agency

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

315 East 10th Street. (New York Department of Taxes, Records for Block 404, Lot 48).

Elizabeth McCormick and Julia Gross likely never met. But, as students at the “well known” St. Brigid’s Academy at 315 East 10th Street, they both made the same walk between Avenues A and B to a rowhouse nestled in the center of the block. They would have looked up and seen the same quatrefoils leaflets visible today on the molding of the rusty-brown parapet and around the front door. Perhaps, like wistful students all across the city, the girls stared dreamily out of one of the nearly dozen windows overlooking Tompkins Square Park, half-listening to lessons on Dutch immigration to the city or how the land the school stood on was once a farm that Petrus Stuyvesant, the director-general of the Dutch West India Company, had owned.

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A Recently Desecrated Synagogue Was Once Home to a Lower East Side Villain

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

(Photo: Simone Somekh)

At 5pm on a cold Friday evening, a couple dozen men, most wearing black suits, walk towards a red brick, four-story building near Clinton Street on East Broadway. On the facade next to the entrance, large, dark-red and white marks suggest painted-over graffiti. The men do not seem to notice. Above them is a painted sign in Yiddish. Some briefly kiss the fingers of their right hand after touching the mezuzah affixed to the doorpost. As they pass through the narrow entrance, they also enter the Shabbat, the holiest day of the week for observant Jews.

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Trotsky, Auden, and the Abortionist: The Radical History of 77 St. Marks

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Novy Mir‘s basement office at 77 St. Marks Place (Photo: Lewis Hine)

Leon Trotsky disembarked at New York harbor on January 13, 1917, expelled from Europe for agitating against World War I. His family would settle in the Bronx and call New York home for nearly three months.

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From Mobsters to Mekas: A Courthouse’s Second Act as Anthology Film Archives

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Courtesy of AnthologyFilmArchives.org.

The building at the southeast corner of Second Avenue and Second Street that now houses the Anthology Film Archives has always been a crossroads, both symbolically and literally. This “international center for the preservation, study and exhibition of film and video” came into being in 1969 as a counter-thrust to Hollywood, making its focus American independent and avant-garde cinema.

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This Guy Robbed an East Village Bank, Cops Say

(Photo: NYPD)

Panicking about how you’re going to afford those last-minute holiday gifts? Well, there’s always this option…

Around 12:45pm on Dec. 14, the man in the photo shown here walked into the East 1st Street location of TD Bank, stepped up to the counter, and passed a slip demanding money, police say. A bank employee forked over approximately $1,900 to the suspect, who is described as being in his mid 20s or 30s, approximately 5’5″, and about 150 pounds. No one was harmed during the incident.

The bank, at 21 East First Street, is on the former site of Mars Bar. The infamous dive closed in 2011, but apparently the corner of First and Second still sees some wild behavior.