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Watch: Indigenous People Gather to Sing, Dance, and Say ‘Enough of Columbus Day’

Monday, October 9, Columbus Day, officially marks an Italian man’s passage across the Atlantic Ocean, an event that kicked off the genocide of New World natives and paved the way for the Atlantic slave trade. To mark the occasion, several hundred people on Randall’s Island in New York had something else in mind. Representatives of around 75 Native American tribes gathered for two days to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

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New Doc Goes Gaga For ‘Queen of Nightlife’ Susanne Bartsch’s Wild Style

(Photo: Jeff Mermelstein for New York magazine)

As the den mother of the club kids and the Queen of Nightlife, Susanne Bartsch has been profiled countless times, most memorably in 2006 by New York magazine. Back then, none other than Ian Schrager described Bartsch as “a true icon of the night, someone who goes down in the nightlife hall of fame.” Of course, there is no nightlife hall of fame (yet), but Bartsch has now been immortalized in the form of a documentary, Susanne Bartsch: On Top, that will open Newfest, the city’s long-running LGBT film festival.

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Turn On, Tune In, Drop Into This Weekend Conference on Psychedelics

 

Michael Bogenschutz (Photo: Steve Duncan)

Five decades after psychedelics first made their mark on American culture, the promise of psychedelic drugs is being championed by artists, activists, scientists and scholars.

On Oct. 6 to 8, Horizons: Perspectives on Psychedelics will hold its 11th annual conference which brings together researchers and activists to advocate for expanding the use of the mind-altering in medicine and explore the use of psychedelics in art and culture, says Kevin Balktick, who founded the symposium in 2007.

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The Ai Weiwei Installation in Washington Square Park Already Has People Talking

(Photos: Matthew Silver, unless noted.)

The metal-wire Ai Weiwei installation that will reside underneath the Washington Square Arch from October 12 to Feb. 11 isn’t completed yet, but it’s already garnering mixed reviews from people in the neighborhood.

The project, “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors,” is part of a larger exhibition by the Public Art Fund in celebration of its 40th anniversary, and the tall fence-like structure is just one of more than 300 installations that will be scattered across the five boroughs. Another Ai Weiwei installation is going up at Cooper Union.

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At NY Film Festival, Caniba and Voyeur Delve Deep into Sexual Depravity

(From Caniba)

Two documentaries at the New York Film Festival show just how dark human sexuality can be, getting disturbingly up close and personal with the forbidden desires of their subjects. Both take on notable news stories: Voyeur, coming to Netflix and to theaters Dec. 1, is the tale of Gerald Foos, the man who installed a secret “viewing platform” in the attic of his motel in the Denver suburbs, so he could spy on his guests around the clock. Caniba, which also made its US premiere at the festival, is the story of Issei Sagawa, the Japanese man who killed a woman in Paris and ate parts of her in order to satisfy a cannibalism fetish.

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Boom For Real Considers Jean Michel-Basquiat While Another Doc Recalls His Shadowman

Two new documentaries take a look at downtown New York City in the late ’70s and early ’80s, each through the eyes of a different street artist. Boom For Real, making its US premiere at the New York Festival on Sunday, tells the story of Jean-Michel Basquiat as his career began taking off, and Shadowman, which opens wide at Quad Cinema on Dec. 1, considers Richard Hambleton, a contemporary who once fetched more money than Basquiat did, but who practically vanished into obscurity.

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