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Nightlife Advocates and Politicians Want to Dance on the Grave of NYC’s Cabaret Law

(photo: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

Yesterday, hundreds flocked to City Hall to discuss the future of nightlife in New York City at a consumer affairs oversight hearing. It was the first of its kind in over a decade to address the city’s oft-decried cabaret law, which has been in effect since 1926.

“The City licenses bars, clubs, taverns, and discos that allow dancing,” states the City of New York’s official website. “A place that is open to the public and sells food or drinks must have a Cabaret License to allow customers to dance.”

And yet, there currently are only 97 of these licenses in effect. Considering there are thousands of bar and nightclub establishments in New York City where one might feel compelled to shake their hips, there is little wonder that City Council members Rafael Espinal and Antonio Reynoso called themselves both “young Dominicans representing north Brooklyn” and “dance outlaws.” Keep Reading »

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San Loco Is Leaving the East Village After 30 Years

After closing its 15-year-old location on Avenue A back in 2014, San Loco is shuttering its remaining East Village taco joint. The original location on Second Avenue had been serving up guaco locos for over 30 years, but it’s closing Tuesday “due to a rent increase that’s unsustainable,” according to an Instagram message. Here’s the “heartbroken” (and, let’s face it, heartbreaking) announcement, posted just minutes ago.

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Your Chance to Ask Ana Lily Amirpour What She Was On When She Made The Bad Batch

A while back we gave you the heads up that The Bad Batch, Ana Lily Amirpour’s followup to A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, would be part of the Rooftop Films Summer Series. That free screening is on Wednesday at House of Vans in Greenpoint, but you’re probably going to have to wait in line to snag a spot. If you’d rather lock down a seat right now, Amirpour will also be taking questions after a screening at Alamo Drafthouse on Friday. And trust, you’ll want her there, because she’s going to have a lot to explain.

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A Jazzy Little Joint Pops Up in the Old Fitzcarraldo Space

Periodical’s jazz band with their audience at the conclusion of their performance, 6/16/17 at 2am. (Photo: Nick McManus)

Jazz music emanated on a quiet stretch of Morgan Avenue last Thursday as Periodical, a pop-up lounge by local party organizer Lindsay Arden, held its premiere night. With a full band and classy cocktails, Periodical brought to life the space recently vacated by East Williamsburg restaurant Fitzcarraldo. Lindsay, who has most recently been organizing the mega-parties for JunXion at venues like House of Yes in Bushwick and the Paper Factory Hotel in Long Island City, has started her own quant hideaway with all the little elements that have made her bigger endeavors a success.

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This Writer Is On a Cross-Country Road Trip With Social Media at the Wheel

On the Krewe of Tucks throne.

Michael J. Seidlinger and I met a couple of years ago at a bookstore event in Greenpoint. As the publisher of DIY press Civil Coping Mechanisms, the reviews editor of Electric Literature, and a published writer in his own right, he spends a lot of time dropping by events at bookstores. The next time I saw him, he was on a Brooklyn Book Festival panel with Salman Rushdie.

This month, Seidlinger is conducting #FollowMeBook, perhaps best described as a social media experiment. He created a bunch of impossible rules for himself, but the gist is: one month to get from New York to California, staying only with social media connections who can host him for free—no hotels!—without ever staying anywhere for more than two nights. The idea spun out of conversation with writer/editor Janice Lee about a road trip to nowhere, and grew until it became an idea for a book whose social media obsession dovetails nicely with Seidlinger’s recent novels The Strangest and Falter Kingdom.

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Brooklyn Flea and Smorgasburg Are Coming to West Soho

Hot on the heels of a new Chelsea restaurant, Smorgasburg and its sister Brooklyn Flea are continuing their quest for citywide domination with two new markets in West Soho. The first, opening Saturday, will be a “permanent” location of Brooklyn Flea, inside of an 89-year-old Art Deco building at 100 Avenue of the Americas. According to an announcement sent out today, Brooklyn Flea Soho “will occupy the 13,000 square-foot ground-floor indoor space with 60 vendors for at least the next two years, year-round, on weekends only to start.” This should give veteran vendors and newbs alike more to do in the wake of Williamsburg Flea’s closure.

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Lawsuit: Owner of Will Ferrell Theme Bar Should Stay Classy and Pay Back $120K

It’s a story worthy of five-time Emmy-Award-winning anchor Ron Burgundy and Tits McGee. An investor who teamed up with the owners of Will Ferrell-themed bar Stay Classy New York claims he’s owed $120,000. By the beard of Zeus!

In a lawsuit filed Wednesday, Michael Galkovich alleges that the owners of the Lower East Side bar, Zachary Hosier and Brian Link, agreed to make him a managing partner and a 70-percent owner of the bar’s parent company if he paid them $120,000 and won approval from the State Liquor Authority. Galkovich put in $60,000 up front, but he never got the chance to become an owner, the suit alleges.

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Zomething Different Has Come to Brooklyn

You’ll have to book a flight to Tokyo if you want to hit one of the last remaining outlets of Tower Records, but you’ll no longer have to do the same to experience another throwback to the ’90s: the sickly sweet taste of Zima. The sparkling lemon-lime cooler, which was discontinued here in 2008 but remains popular over in Nippon, has returned to the states just for the summer. MillerCoors is bringing it back, complete with a website that screams GeoCities running on Netscape.

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Max Fish’s New T-Shirt Depicts a Real New Yorker

(Photo: Max Fish’s Instagram)

We’ve always loved artist Andrew Kuo’s cheeky Max Fish shirts, with their slumming-down of brands like Ralph Lauren Polo and Harvard. But this one really takes the urinal cake. Kuo has turned New Yorker mascot Eustace Tilley into a beer-funneling reprobate worthy of the Lower East Side dive. The iconic cover image’s butterfly has been replaced with a fly straight out of the Fish’s bathrooms. The shirts are selling for $30 at the bar. They’re long-sleeved, which isn’t ideal for summer– but they will protect you against skateboarding scrapes.

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Inside the Historic Building That’s Quietly Home to Disgraced Televangelist Trinity Broadcasting

TBN’s building at 111 E. 15th St., near Union Square.

Spreading the word of God has been extremely lucrative for Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN), the world’s largest Christian broadcasting company. The organization’s late founders, evangelical power couple Paul and Jan Crouch, were renowned for extravagant lifestyles notably lacking in Christian asceticism or self-denial – his-and-hers mega-mansions in Newport Beach, chauffeured Bentleys, and $57 million in private jets. Jan maintained an air-conditioned trailer just for her snow-white Maltese dogs.

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