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Performance Picks: Anime Burlesque, Weed-Friendly Variety, and Warholian Theater

(Image via Vylette Tendency / Facebook)

WEDNESDAY

High Concepts: A 420 Variety Show

Wednesday, April 24 at Casa Delgado, 8 pm: $10 

Yes, 420 was last week, but maybe you had to work, or maybe you just can’t get enough of herb-centric events. Whatever you’re feeling, know that tonight you can experience yet another high-minded live performance experience. Drag and burlesque performers Vylette Tendency and Doll Body’s High Concepts variety show features burlesque acts, games, and a raffle to benefit Drug Policy Alliance. The intimate, speakeasy-style event embraces the fact that it’s a late 4/20 show, which admittedly does feel on brand for those who often partake of the herb, as scatterbrained-ness is always a possibility.

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50 Years After Stonewall, Art Show Honors Diversity of the Queer Rights Movement

(Photos: Cecilia Nowell)

Documentary footage from the 20th-anniversary commemoration of the Stonewall Uprisings plays at the entrance to the Grey Art Gallery. On screen, activists laud the riots sparked by Marsha P. Johnson from the stage, while protestors boo loudly from the sidelines. Under a large sign welcoming visitors to “Art after Stonewall, 1969-1989,” the video, produced by ACT UP’s guerilla video collective DIVA TV, sets the tone for an exhibit that explores how much has, and has not, changed for the queer community 50 years after the Stonewall Riots.

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A Collective Hub in Ridgewood Wants to Realign Your Gaze Away From the Abyss

(Photos courtesy of Woodbine)

On a typical weekend morning in Ridgewood, young families spill out of brunches at Julia’s and Norma’s and friends gather to work or catch up at Topos Bookstore. It’s a scene much like any other neighborhood in Queens: the elevated train rattles overhead and groups wander from coffee shop to bodega, to bookstore and wine bar.

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A Truly Theatrical Experience at Hudson Yards’ New Art Space, The Shed

(Photos: Amanda Feinman)

The Shed’s glossy lobby is mere feet from dusty Eleventh Avenue, but atmospheric light years away. When I walked through its glass doors on Wednesday night, I thought first about the luxury-home-meets-AI-laboratory in Ex Machina, where Oscar Isaac both lives lavishly and builds humanoid robots for a creepy corporation.

New York’s new multi-arts space on the Hudson is a futuristic-looking glass structure with a retractable roof and an enormous escalator that spirals up and down its eight-level spine. Making your way up to the theater space on the sixth floor is not unlike heading to the top levels of the Union Square multiplex, if that multiplex were magnificent in a mod, Hudson Yards way. If, as you wound your way up to see the fiftieth Transformers movie, you were in a transformer, and the river was glittering in every line of sight.

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Bret Easton Ellis Thinks It’s ‘Delicious’ to Trigger Millennials, So Why Does He Want a Safe Space?

When Bret Easton Ellis strode into a Midtown auditorium for his TimesTalk last night, I was almost surprised to hear the enthusiastic applause. After all, his just-published first collection of essays, White, has provoked reviews with headlines like “Bret Easton Ellis’s Non-Fiction Is Lazy, Boring” and “Bret Easton Ellis’s Book ‘White’ and Why You Don’t Need to Read It.” Add to that, a New Yorker interview about Trump that was so awkward that a friend forwarded it to me with an “Oof.” For a moment, it seemed like the author of American Psycho—the writer who “was canceled before cancelling was a thing,” as fellow provocateur Bari Weiss recently put it— was about to truly be canceled in much the same way his most famous novel was ditched by its original publisher.

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As L Hell Begins, Some Aren’t On Board With the MTA’s Plan For Buses

(Photo: InSapphoWeTrust via WikiCommons)

With a slowdown of the L line beginning April 26, Manhattan residents are protesting the MTA’s plan to cut around 17 stops from the bus line that runs across 14th Street and through Alphabet City.

The proposed plan would turn the M14 A/D bus, which crosses 14th and runs up and down Avenues A and D, into a Select Bus Service (SBS) line. Certain local stops will be gone as soon as June or July, with every other stop in the Lower East Side being eliminated.  

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Experience Persian Immersion at This Iranian Film, Music, and Theater Fest

If you thought Persepolis was the only work of Iranian culture to make waves in recent years, Emruz Festival is hoping to change that. Happening over two long weekends, April 19-21 and 26-28, at the Spectrum performance space in the Brooklyn Tech Triangle, the inaugural festival will consist of musical performances, theater productions, and short films by independent Iranian artists living inside and outside of the United States.

Emruz means “today” in Farsi, and the festival’s organizers are interested in asking “What are we today, right now?” and “What is happening with us as immigrants in this country?” said theater director/choreographer Shadi Ghaheri. She and Iranian composer Niloufar Nourbakhsh wanted to interrogate the role of the artist in addressing these contemporary issues of identity.

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Roosevelt Island Cherry Blossom Festival: Neoliberal Disaster or Neo-Fascist Catastrophe?

(Photo via @luciuswok on Twitter)

Everyone in the train car looked up in comic bewilderment as the E train glided past the platform of Roosevelt Island Station. “Due to police activity, the E train will not stop at this station,” the conductor announced. Confused and in a futile, panicked hurry, the passengers rushed out at the next stop to beat the growing crowd to the opposite platform; they would try again. It was already 3:36pm, and the Roosevelt Island Cherry Blossom Festival was well underway.

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