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Poetry, Painting and Village Pride Square Off at Creativity Cubed

What were Richard Hell, Joe Strummer, and Patti Smith doing on Astor Place this past Saturday? Images of the Village legends were plastered on miniature versions of Tony Rosenthal’s Alamo as part of Creativity Cubed. To celebrate the Cube’s 50th anniversary, the Village Alliance brought poetry performances, collaborative mural painting, and storytelling together for what one participant called a “free creativity free-for-all monstrosity.” Watch our video to find out what that means.

Video by Farah Idrees.

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A Look Back at the Drag March and Pride Parade

On Friday night, drag queens and their admirers once again gathered in Tompkins Square Park to kick off the annual Drag March to Stonewall Inn. This year’s festivities honored Gilbert Baker (aka Busty Ross), the artist, activist, and rainbow flag creator who died earlier this year. We spoke to participants like Brian Griffin (aka Harmonie Moore Must Die), who helped start the march with Baker in 1994. Watch that video above, and then play the video below for a taste of Sunday’s official NYC Pride March.

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I Rented a Tiny Pop-Up Cabin On a City Beach and Thoreauly Enjoyed It

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

When I first caught wind that Getaway, a startup that rents out tiny homes in upstate parks, was bringing its pop-up cabins to the Gateway National Recreation Area, I assumed they would be in the park’s crown jewel, Fort Tilden. In the name of adventure, the house rental service keeps the exact location of its mobile “handcrafted cabins” mysterious until about a week before you check in. Still, they did offer the clue that the cabin would be on a beach, near a boardwalk, and off of city transportation. Fort Tilden, right??? Wrong. That city transportation turned out to be the Staten Island Ferry.

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Crispin Glover Previewed His New Movie, Shot in His Czech Chateau With His Bond-Villain Dad

Crispin Glover during the Q&A. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

The two films Crispin Glover made in the mid-aughts have long been the holy grail of midnight movies. The notoriously eccentric actor-director has kept a tight grip on their distribution, so the only way to see them is during the occasional screenings he hosts. During two of those screenings this week at IFC Center, the audience got an even more special treat. Dressed in a vest and tie a la PT Barnum, Glover broke out his laptop and showed a preview of his next film, which he wrote for his father Bruce Glover, an actor best known for playing a Bond villain in Diamonds Are Forever.

As with much of Crispin Hellion Glover’s work, the impressionistic trailer was hard to describe from memory; there was a veiled woman, top-hatted men, a baby doll floating down a river, and some tommy gun fights. The as-yet untitled work had the sort of noir tinge that you’d expect from something that was filmed in a 17th century Czewch castle.
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LES Residents at De Blasio Town Hall: Don’t Let High-Rises Push Us Out

Mayor de Blasio and council member Chin at the well-attended town hall meeting in the Lower East Side © Kasper van Laarhoven

Over 300 residents of the Lower East Side and Chinatown gathered in a Bowery gym for Mayor de Blasio’s 27th town hall Wednesday, and we probably don’t have to tell you what the theme of the evening was. You guessed it: gentrification, particularly with regard to the 60-plus-story towers rising over Two Bridges.

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Just When You Thought It Was Safe, Sharks Wash Up On City Shores

(Photo: Dylan Sirgiovanni)

Who needs a screening of Jaws on the water when you can see a real, live shark in Rockaway Beach?

No, it’s not a great white, but Instagram user Dylan Sirgiovanni spotted this sizeable, bug-eyed fish, which looks like a dusky shark, at 136th Street. He said he saw it on Tuesday evening and after snapping a picture, he did what any person with a healthy disregard for their hands would dohelped it back into the water.

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The Guys From Blonde Redhead Played Bicycle Film Fest, and It Really ‘Spoke’ to Us

Simone and Amedeo Pace (at left) with their band at the conclusion of their performance, 6/21/17. (Photo: Nick McManus)

Brendt Barbour kicked off the 17th annual Bicycle Film Fest the same way he has kicked off all the others– by leading the crowd at the San Damiano Mission in Greenpoint in a call-and-response chant of “bikes rock.” After the chant finished echoing off the saints painted on the church’s domed ceiling, it was time for Blonde Redhead members Simone and Amedeo Pace to perform a live score for the acclaimed bicycle race documentary A Sunday In HellFor 90 minutes, the two musicians and their band brought orchestral accompaniment to a film in which a symphony of 25 cameras covered the 1976 running of the Paris Roubaix bicycle race.

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Protesting Trump By Taking a Page From Westboro Baptist Church?

Non-profit Chelsea bookstore Printed Matter is now stocking the latest suite of protest signs from Lower East Side-based indie art publisher Badlands Unlimited. Inspired by the Westboro Baptist Church’s infamous “God Hates Fags” signs, these, however, have messages like FAGS HATE TRUMP, GOD HATES TRUMP, and TRUMP DOOMS AMERICA.

“The signs are really meant to be carried out into ongoing protests and rallies,” said Micaela Durand, director of Badlands Unlimited. “They’re inspired by the Westboro Baptist Church signs; we wanted to subvert that speech.”

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Concert Footage From the Golden Years Of NYC Punk Hits the Big Screen

A few years ago we had the privilege of sharing some of the concert footage that video artists Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong compiled between 1977 and 1980, when New York’s punk and No Wave scenes were at their peak. Back then, NYU Fales Library had just acquired and was digitizing their vast Nightclubbing archive, comprised of 82 bands and 115 shows, and the filmmakers hooked us up with a trove of rare video and photos from one of the golden eras of NYC rock.

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Nightlife Advocates and Politicians Want to Dance on the Grave of NYC’s Cabaret Law

(photo: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

Yesterday, hundreds flocked to City Hall to discuss the future of nightlife in New York City at a consumer affairs oversight hearing. It was the first of its kind in over a decade to address the city’s oft-decried cabaret law, which has been in effect since 1926.

“The City licenses bars, clubs, taverns, and discos that allow dancing,” states the City of New York’s official website. “A place that is open to the public and sells food or drinks must have a Cabaret License to allow customers to dance.”

And yet, there currently are only 97 of these licenses in effect. Considering there are thousands of bar and nightclub establishments in New York City where one might feel compelled to shake their hips, there is little wonder that City Council members Rafael Espinal and Antonio Reynoso called themselves both “young Dominicans representing north Brooklyn” and “dance outlaws.” Keep Reading »