news

No Comments

Come to The Boy Downstairs For Zosia Mamet and Stay For Fabrizio the Italian Doorman

(Photo: Melissa Hom for NY Mag)

Back when I was doing the Ask a Waiter column for B+B’s sister blog, Grub Street, I had a highly memorable encounter with ultra-suave doorman Fabrizio Brienza, who at the time was the gatekeeper of a lounge at the Plaza Hotel. While most doormen try to justify their social Darwinism with the obligatory spiel about cultivating diversity (they just want a “nice mix,” a la Studio 54), Fabrizio was more upfront: “My policy of doing the door is really simple,” he said in his Italian accent. “If you look good and you’re cool and you’re stylish and you’re surrounded by beautiful, chic, chic girls, I’ll take care of you.”

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Pols Get Amped For Electric Bus Service During L Shutdown

Would electric buses soften the blow of the approaching L train shutdown? City Council members Rafael Espinal and Stephen Levin think so, and yesterday they called on the MTA to make it happen.

Aside from being an inconvenience for more than 200,000 daily commuters who ride the L train daily, the 15-month shutdown planned for 2019 will also cause an increase in carbon emissions as the subway is replaced with more car and bus traffic. Electric buses would solve the problem of noxious bus fumes while pushing the city closer to a more sustainable and environmentally-friendly public transit system, the council members said during a press conference.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Wylie Dufresne Opens Du’s Donuts and Coffee in Williamsburg

(Photo: Liz Clayman for NY Mag)

In 2013, former wd~50 pastry chef Sam Mason opened up a cutting-edge ice cream shop in Williamsburg, and now wd~50’s big cahuna, famed modernist chef Wylie Dufresne, is opening up a donut shop nearby. Du’s Donuts and Coffee opens today adjacent the William Vale hotel, right next to where former child star Dylan Sprouse is set to launch a meadery.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Tim Heidecker Plays a Dorky Dad in Flower, Which Is Not ‘Just a Blow Job Movie’

Zoey Deutch in Flower. (Photo: Carolina Costa)

If you’re a fan of Tim and Eric Awesome Show, you probably think of Tim Heidecker as an eternal infant, reveling in funny faces and fart noises. But that’s starting to change now that the New Yorker has called him a “bard of suburban fatherhood.” (Not that he’s gone entirely straight– that same article mentioned his band’s “themed album all about imbibing urine.”) So it’s not a complete shock to see the king of infantile absurdism playing a painfully dorky dad in Flower, a film by Max Winkler that premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival last week.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

We Poked Our Head into the Newest Poke Bowl Spot, Raw Mkt

The latest fast-casual joint to hit NYU’s West 8th Street corridor is also the latest poke bowl spot to hit the city. No, this one doesn’t sell Dole Whip. But it’s got a few things going for it, starting with a mini market selling Japanese goods.

Okay, so the market is more like a few shelves on the wall, and isn’t likely to assuage those still mourning the recent loss of M2M nearby. But still, you can pick up Japanese goodies like Pocky, Hi-Chew, Hello Panda, and wasabi peas, along with condiments like sesame oil and Sriracha.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Sofar Sounds Is Booking Secret Gigs in a Secret Loft Near You

The bands, staff and audience of Sofar Sounds’ show at Secret Loft in Bushwick, 4/12/17. (Photo: Nick McManus)

More and more music fans in New York have had it with the state of small live performances today. Random band lineups and chatty venues that don’t feel like they’re part of an aesthetic community have fed the demand for more eclectic programming in quiet environments like the curated Hum concerts and the uber-analogue record listenings at Classic Album Sundays. One of the largest producers of these shows in New York City is Sofar Sounds, which books 60 shows a month at various residential and commercial spaces all over the city.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Benefit Show Gives a Leg Up to Artist Who Lost an Arm in Subway Accident

Artist David Nordine (second from left) with his benefit party’s organizer Michaelangelo Aurello (far right). (Photo: Nick McManus)

Back in February, David Nordine, a mainstay on the street art scene of his native Lower East Side, lost part of his left arm after being struck be a subway train in Brighton Beach. Since then he’s been receiving support from his friends and exhibitors via a GoFundMe campaign that has raised over $27,000 and a benefit show last month at Bushwick’s Head Too Heavy Gallery.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Shadowman Sheds Light On Richard Hambleton, Banksy of the ’80s East Village

(Photo: Ben Buchanan, courtesy of Storyville Films and Motto Pictures)

During a recent trip to Denver, I noticed that the city’s Museum of Contemporary Art was hosting two exhibits celebrating downtown New York: a solo show dedicated to Lit fixture Ryan McGinley and a retrospective of the art Basquiat made at his East 12th Street studio in 1979 and 1980.

To find a Basquiat exhibit in those snow climes wasn’t surprising, given he’s one of the most ubiquitous artists of all-time. But Richard Hambleton, a contemporary of his who in the ‘80s was on track to achieve a similar level of fame, remains comparatively unknown, even though he’s still creating striking paintings in the East Village. A documentary that premiered Saturday at the Tribeca Film Festival, Oren Jacoby’s Shadowman, seeks to revive interest in the artist, and it looks like that may actually happen. His works are currently on display at Woodward Gallery, on the Lower East Side, and on Sunday at Shop Studios there was a one-night pop-up exhibit of works that Hambleton created during the past year. Could he finally get his due as a precursor to Banksy, who has admitted to being influenced by Hambleton? Keep Reading »

No Comments

Help Chinatown Favorite Spicy Village Celebrate Its New T-Shirt Line

Despite being one of the lone neighborhoods in Manhattan to preserve its heritage and verve, Chinatown sometimes seems unaware of its cultural cachet. Whether it’s because it has shunned the branding that raises rents or because of the anti-curb appeal of hanging carcasses and crates of seafood along the streets, the hood has maintained status as a lowkey downtown enclave for creatives and families alike.

At the same time, there’s been an uptick in uptown influence, most notably André Saraiva’s Café Hernie on Forsyth Street, as well as several boutique businesses. Despite the abundance of new options, local creatives Alberto Chapa and Riley Metcalf flock to Chinatown’s authenticity, specifically the place named the second most essential restaurant in New York by Eater.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

In Flames, a Failed Couple Airs ‘The Dirtiest of Dirty Laundry’

You know you’re not at a typical post-screening Q&A when someone in the audience asks the filmmakers, “Do you still love each other?”

Zefrey Throwell and Josephine Decker had just premiered Flames, a nakedly honest (and I do mean nakedly honest) portrait of their nearly one-year relationship, and the question could have just as easily been, “Do you still hate each other?”

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Could More Be Done to Stop All the Suicides at the George Washington Bridge?

The George Washington Bridge has been the site of dozens of suicides in recent years. (Photo: Razi Syed)

Around 4 a.m. on Oct. 5, Daniel Lomtevas slipped out of his Dyker Heights home. Eight minutes later, the 17-year-old hailed an Uber to take him to 2111 86th Street, Brooklyn and boarded the D train towards Manhattan.

At 7:16 a.m., according to photo metadata, Daniel had reached the George Washington Bridge, which connects Washington Heights and New Jersey. He took a picture around the start of southern pathway, overlooking the Hudson River. Less than 20 minutes later, his unconscious body was brought to New York-Presbyterian hospital. He was pronounced dead about an hour after his arrival there.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

4/20 Show at Don Pedro Ends in a Blaze as Fire Sparks Up Next Door

The facade of Don Pedro underneath the smashed-out windows of the second floor. (Photo: Nick McManus)

The ceiling damage in Don Pedro’s back room. (Photo: Nick McManus)

A fire broke out next to Don Pedro last night, seriously harshing a 4/20 show scheduled at the Williamsburg venue.

The blaze started at the closed Lantingua’s Deli Market shortly after 6pm, as Don Pedro’s patrons were enjoying happy hour, and raged on the first and second floors of the building at 92 Manhattan Avenue for an hour and a half, according to the FDNY. Four firefighters were taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

Keep Reading »