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New York Pizza Project Searches For a Slice of Authenticity

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If there are two constants we face as New Yorkers, one is change and the other, our hunger for pizza. It was only a matter of time then before someone combined the two — in this case, five friends who over the past four years documented a changing New York through the time-weathered eyes of 120 of the “most authentic slice joints.” The result of there efforts: The New York Pizza Project book, which launched last week. In the excitement of the long-awaited release, we caught up with project member Ian Manheimer to find out more about the project, his thoughts on the precarious concept that is authenticity, and what makes the perfect pizzeria.

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Author Joshua Mohr Hopes San Francisco Gets Destroyed by a Radioactive Lizard

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While New Yorkers can be blind to events in other cities, there are many reasons to sympathize with San Franciscans in Joshua Mohr’s new novel All This Life. Specifically, gentrification (the Mission is finally going the way of Williamsburg, in case you didn’t notice), addiction to tech, and a yearning for societal interaction that social media merely imitates.

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Justin Frye of PC Worship Used a ‘Shitar’ On the New EP, Basement Hysteria

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

Despite the relentless output of records, save for some piecemeal rumors, there’s not a ton to go on when it comes to PC Worship, a Bushwick-based band that spans several rotating members (but is always led by Justin Frye) as well as influences of punk, drone, even free jazz. They’re known for wild improvisation but also their success in collaborations with Parquet Courts (a popular band that is in many ways their opposite). But most critics and music bloggers have agreed: PC Worship is nothing if not inexplicable. And their new EP, Basement Hysteria, set to drop November 13 when they return from a month-long European tour, sees the band containing the tradition of drone-clouded noise worship.

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Saul Williams On MartyrLoserKing: ‘I’m Trying to Redefine Gangster’

Saul Williams (Photo Credit: Sam Gillette).

Saul Williams (Photo Credit: Sam Gillette).

Saul Williams — the well-known poet, musician and actor who got his start at dark, intimate open mics throughout Brooklyn in the ’90s, rose to prominence at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe, and recently starred on Broadway in Holler If Ya Hear Me — will release a new collection of poetry, US (a.)on Sept. 15. Beyond the book, he’s also in the midst of creating his multi-media project MartyrLoserKing (MLK). Earlier this summer, Williams finished a nation-wide tour to promote the album, which will drop in early 2016. Now he’s writing the script for the MLK film — a deviation from the play he originally envisioned. The third leg of the project is the same-titled graphic novel, which will also be released in 2016.

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Read This Book Before You Snapchat That Masked Punk Musician

"Placid Girl"

“Placid Girl”

“What if on the outside of this picture, where this guy is sitting on a chair with his guitar, there’s a chained up hostage being held outside the frame?” said Brenna Ehrlich, explaining the inspiration behind her debut novel. “That would be super weird.”

Ehrlich will launch Placid Girl tonight at her neighborhood bookstore, Word in Greenpoint. She describes the YA thriller as a punk rock version of Catfish. After Hallie, a young aspiring drummer, starts talking to her “favorite masked punk musician” on a photo-sharing app, she decides to travel with a group of friends to meet Haze in person. The result is a gut-knotting trajectory from suburban teenager to dangerously obsessed fangirl.

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How Ten Thousand Saints Revived ’80s Punk in a ‘Very Sterile East Village’

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Last week saw the release of Ten Thousand Saints, which we’ve been looking forward to ever since the film reenacted the Tompkins Square Park riot last year. The adaptation of Eleanor Henderson’s novel revolves around a hippie father, Les (Ethan Hawke), who brings his teenage son, Jude (Asa Butterfield), to the tumultuous East Village in 1988, the year of the riot.

While living with his way-too-chill, pot-smoking dad, Jude becomes absorbed in the straight-edge punk scene and fascinated by a rich, uptown girl (Hailee Steinfeld). Variety describes the film as a “love letter to a bygone era of New York City,” and, because we have our own love affair with that time and place, we played jealous lover and did some snooping. We spoke with directors Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini (American Splendor, Girl Most Likely, The Nanny Diaries) about how the East Village of the 1980s intertwines with the lives of the characters, why Ethan Hawke is the ultimate New Yorker, those silly lap dogs on the Upper East Side, and Springer Berman’s accidental involvement in that epic clash of police and residents.

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Five Years After Interpol, Carlos D Tells Us Where He’s Been Hiding

Carlos D, former bassist of Interpol is now Carlos Dengler, actor (Photo: Craig Johnson)

Carlos D, former bassist of Interpol is now Carlos Dengler, actor – here in his one-man show, “Homo Sapiens Interruptus” (Photo: Craig Johnston)

Carlos D, former bass player of Interpol, was an integral part of the band — and was once described as its “most infamous” member. As a founder of the heavily bass-driven post-punk outfit that dominated the indie rock scene of the early aughts, his seemingly sudden departure in 2010 after issuing four solid albums, and realizing fame and success beyond what he could have ever imagined, was shocking for many fans. Not only did Carlos D quit the band, he disappeared from the downtown scene he inhabited altogether.

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Best Behavior’s Debut Album Came Out of a ‘Montel Williams-Style Breakup’

Best Behavior. (Photo Credit: Mike Prieto)

Best Behavior. (Photo Credit: Mike Prieto)

Bushwick band Best Behavior is already catching attention and touring nationally — even though it only formed in January. A self-described “60s garage rock, surf punk” band, the four guys are preparing for the release of their debut LP, Good Luck Bad Karma, which drops today via Money Fire Records. As is required of any self-respecting garage-rock band, a celebration of the release will ensue at Union Pool on Saturday night. They’ll perform with Haybaby, The Rizzos, and Surf Rock Is Dead, which released a new single today.

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Molly Soda, an Artist Who’s ‘Famous On Tumblr,’ Explores IRL

Molly Soda outside Stream Gallery in Bushwick (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Molly Soda outside Stream Gallery in Bushwick (Photo: Nicole Disser)

I was in Detroit for New Year’s Eve sometime in the recent past, and ended up partying at a place called North End Studios. I was taking lots of stupid party photos and snapped a photo of a friend who had nestled up to another girl I didn’t know. This mystery woman was clutching a tallboy of Coors, not unusual, but she also wore purple-painted eyebrows, a high-collared ivory fur coat, and a black beanie with skulls on it. I posted it on Instagram and instantly accumulated a hefty number of likes.

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Brooklyn Comic Simeon Goodson is Leaving the Building

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

You’d expect someone like Brooklyn-born comedian Simeon Goodson to be straight up freaking out right about now. Depending on who you are, an impending move to Abu Dhabi could strike you as utterly terrifying or worthy of giddy anticipation. The dazzling, conservative Vegas of the Middle East is a polarizing place to say the least. But somehow Simeon’s experiencing these two extremes and managing still to take things as they come. While the United Arab Emirates is hardly the dream home for a guy who enjoys swigging glasses of Hennessy (“OD ice”) and belting out karaoke renditions of “Trap Queen,” Sim sees his impending move there less like a stint in purgatory and more an enjoyable challenge and the chance to be a transplant for once in his life.

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The Kids Will Revisit the Kids of Kids, Released 20 Years Ago Today

Larry Clark, Leo Fitzpatrick, and Jonny Abrahams (Photo: PepKim)

Larry Clark, Leo Fitzpatrick, and Jonny Abrahams (Photo: PepKim)

Kids celebrated its anniversary at BAM last month, but it was actually 20 years ago today that it hit the big screen at Angelika Film Center. So it makes sense that on July 16, director Larry Clark and his star Leo Fitzpatrick reconvened at Angelika for another anniversary screening of Clark’s personal 35-mm print. This time, they were accompanied not by Chloe and Rosario, but by Hamilton Harris (you’ll remember him as the guy who taught everyone in Washington Square Park how to roll a blunt), who premiered a sizzle reel for his in-the-works documentary about the kids of Kids.

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A Nice, Clean Convo With Potty Mouth, Playing Gigawatts Fest This Weekend

Potty Mouth (Photo Credit: Jesse Riggins).

Potty Mouth (Photo Credit: Jesse Riggins).

Who likes a Potty Mouth? That’s not just a line your mom says before grabbing the soap: it’s the name of one of the much buzzed about bands performing at Gigawatts Festival this Saturday. We rang up Abby Weems and Ally Einbinder to learn more about the punk-pop trio’s upcoming show and to find out if they’re ready to spring the follow-up to their well received last album, Hell Bent, released in 2013 by North Brooklyn’s own Old Flame Records. They were tight-lipped (rather than potty-mouthed) about that, but we did talk about their band crushes, translating life into lyrics, and mansplaining. Yes, they know how much that pedal costs and, yes, they know how to use it.

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