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Get in the Loup at This Womenswear Label’s LES Pop-Up

(image courtesy of loup)

(image courtesy of loup)

Contemporary women’s fashion label loup, previously only sold online and through retailers like NastyGal and Anthropologie, is opening its very first pop-up shop on Rivington Street. It will be a brief affair, starting on October 19 and wrapping up October 24.

The NYC-based label, helmed by designer Danielle Ribner, will be selling its Fall/Winter 2016 line, which features items like wide-leg “culotte jeans” and jumpsuits, boxy blazers, colorful sweaters, and plenty of denim, twill, and suede. As an exclusive to the pop-up shop, cozy crewneck loup sweatshirts will also be for sale, available in mostly grays and blues.

Though the buzz about buying local generally focuses on food, this time it rings true for the fabrics that adorn those sentient sacs of flesh we call bodies. The brand is Parisian-inspired (loup is French for wolf), but its production is genuinely local. According to its website, Ribner works “solely” with factories in the Garment District to produce the label’s clothes, so essentially every step of the process happens in the city.

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‘Gender-Free’ Fashion Infiltrates a Bed-Stuy Basement

(photo: Luis Nieto Dickens | NoSleep.co)

(photo: Luis Nieto Dickens | NoSleep.co)

On Thursday evening, a group of 10 or 15 people descended into a mysterious basement on Bed-Stuy’s Myrtle Avenue. If not for the beats of FKA Twigs that floated up the dark staircase, you might have missed it completely. The space, which lies below an apartment and has been renovated into an art space called TT Gallery, carries a musty scent and feels otherworldly. Some of the floor is still dirt, the intricate roof panels and stone walls look like something out of a Final Fantasy realm. Only, the characters of this world weren’t there to adventure amongst monsters, but to strut their stuff. This was the setting for Iranian-born, Montreal-based designer and artist Pedram Karimi‘s SS17 show.

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Kinfolk Welcomes London Pop-Up, Offers Womenswear For the First Time

(photo: You Must Create)

(photo: You Must Create)

Kinfolk has been occupying a significant slice of Williamsburg’s bustling Wythe Avenue for some time now, with their event and studio space at 90 Wythe and their adjacent Kinfolk 94, a multidisciplinary space with a menswear boutique at its front. The company’s clothing has a multifaceted basis in streetwear, sportswear, and heritage styles, offering a variety of pieces such as bold and colorful bomber jackets, pastel-hued blazers, Kinfolk-branded Adidas jerseys, and poppy graphic tees.

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Tourists, Say ‘I ❤ NY’ With This ‘I Want to Be Pushed in Front of the Subway’ Shirt

A t-shirt designed by the artist Pablo Power (Photo: Courtesy of La Petite Mort)

A t-shirt designed by the artist Pablo Power (Photo: Courtesy of La Petite Mort)

The last time we checked in on the Lower East Side-based boutique La Petite Mort, owners Kara Mullins and Osvaldo Jimenez were facing eviction from their 37 Orchard Street location. In an attempt to save their shop, the pair launched a GoFundMe campaign that proved successful: They were able to raise $15,000, way above their minimum goal of $7,200, and settle their case with their landlord in court. “We’re basically on a payment plan now,” Mullins explained. “As long as we pay our bills on time, we can stay, and hopefully for a long time.”

The newfound stability has allowed the couple to finally pursue a new project: HILOVENEWYORK, a cheeky play on those ubiquitous “I Love NY” t-shirts that litter the stalls on Canal Street. Mullins and Jimenez describe the “sub-brand” of La Petite Mort as an art concept that tries to reinvent the humdrum, depersonalized souvenir t-shirt by adding a personalized twist. 

“I’m pretty sure you’ve gone on vacation, and you’ll go take a photo of Eiffel tour, go to a few restaurants, buy a souvenir, and then go home,” said Jimenez, a born-and-bred New Yorker. “But just imagine you went to Paris, met a local, you fell in love, and he took you all over the place and showed you around. And then, when you left, you’d take one of his t-shirts with you. Just imagine how much more valuable that shirt would be to you than any tacky souvenir you’d find in an airport gift shop.”

This concept of an “alternative souvenir” fueled Jimenez’ idea for a more personalized approach to mementos. “I would go to thrift stores in different parts of the city and I’d find this collection of shirts no one would pay attention to, but to me they were unique because they were shirts you’d only get if you lived or worked or went to school in the city.” He began collecting t-shirts from union meetings, concerts, local sports clubs, and more, all of which would then go on to form part of HILOVENEWYORK’s vintage collection. “These items of clothing are honest and true to the people here,” he said.

A jacket from the HILOVENEWYORK collection (Photo: Courtesy of La Petite Mort)

A jacket from the HILOVENEWYORK collection (Photo: Courtesy of La Petite Mort)

The collection is available at the shop and online. Jimenez also plans to feature limited-edition shirts created by different artists every two weeks. “They’re going to make their own interpretation of what a New York tourist t-shirt should be,” he said.

Another vintage t-shirt from the HILOVENEWYORK collection (Photo: Courtesy of La Petite Mort)

Another vintage t-shirt from the HILOVENEWYORK collection (Photo: Courtesy of La Petite Mort)

In addition to creating a collection of unique vintage souvenir shirts, Jimenez and Mullins are planning a variety of pop-up events at their store around the concept of “personalized New York.”

“We’ll be collaborating with people on films and art, and we’ll have music outside the store on certain nights,” Mullins explained. On June 21, in collaboration with Make Music NY, La Petite Mort will be hosting the bands Tiger Tooth and Sunshine Gun Club for a 3pm concert. “We’re collaborating with ‘Magikal Charm,’ a yearly independent film festival, and working with them on future film screening,” she added. Another current project is a solo show in the shop for the artist Pablo Power. In order to stay informed on upcoming events, Mullins recommended following them on Instagram (@HILOVENEWYORK and @LAPETITEMORTNYC).

(Photo: Courtesy of La Petite Mort)

(Photo: Courtesy of La Petite Mort)

The couple hopes that their store and their events will help change the perception many outsiders and newcomers may have of the city. “I want to rebrand the concept of what people think New York as a whole is,” Jimenez said. “Everyone talks about how New York is dead, but if we support each other, and if we’re each others life support, then how can it die?”

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Plan Your Romance Revolt at This Holiday Lingerie Pop-Up on Ludlow Street

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(Photo by Kavitha Surana)

Whitney Brown predicts 2016 might be the year New Yorkers finally turn off Tinder. (We imagine every bartender in town is rooting for this miracle as well.) But she’s adamant that our Seamless hook-up mentality has just about run its course, and we’re bound to return to an era where big, romantic gestures are in style once again. “Romance in the 21st century is in sort of a struggle stage,” Brown said. It was hard to imagine this willowy model-entrepreneur could be having any issues. Well actually, Brown is in the business of love, or romance at least, so it’s in her best interest to see a return to romance.

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Brooklyn ‘Nerd Core’ Clothing Company Wants to Make ‘Farm to Closet’ Fashion the Next Big Thing

Teel Lidow, founder of Boerum Apparel (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Teel Lidow, founder of Boerum Apparel (Photo: Nicole Disser)

“I don’t understand why everyone isn’t juicing, it’s just so easy,” I once overheard a waifish juice bar owner declare to her perfectly coiffed dog, or maybe it was her friend. Does it really matter? I don’t think anyone (save for me) was really listening. The point being, ethical eaters often fail to realize that most people don’t have access to luxuries like liquid diets and organic produce that costs multiple times the pesticide-coated stuff, but the founder of Boerum Apparel, a Williamsburg-based sustainable clothing company that invokes foodie language like “small batch” and “farm to closet,” has a better attitude about these things.

“I’m not wearing anything that I have any information about because it’s almost impossible to get that information,” Teel Lidow said, looking down at his Oxford shirt and jeans. And that’s not because he’s a cynical banker boy just trying to make his millions and get out of the sustainable fashion biz. “People need to be clothed and no one needs to be a martyr about this, basically.”

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Multitask This Weekend At Brunch

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A new monthly upscale flea market returns to Bushwick this weekend. The design team from the Moves Concept Store in Williamsburg have teamed up with the health goths of Whatever 21 to bring you a super stimulated brunch-time event at Tandem this Saturday. Some other local designers and boutiques will be selling their frocks as well, including Something Happening Shop, and Sir New York.
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This Fashion Editor Has a Need for Tweed, So We Took Him to Cadet

We give fashionable locals a place to go and they get All Dressed Up.

Benjamin surveys his options at Cadet. (All photos: Lauren Smith)

Benjamin surveys his options at Cadet. (All photos: Lauren Smith)

 “I'm very big on patterns,

“I'm very big on patterns," says Benjamin, in his paisley blazer.

“I have a love-hate relationship with denim. Meaning I actually hate it. But I want to love it,” he says, examining a pair of jeans inspired by '50s aviator pants (according to Brad), with a back buckle and metal detailing.

“I have a love-hate relationship with denim. Meaning I actually hate it. But I want to love it,” he says, examining a pair of jeans inspired by '50s aviator pants (according to Brad), with a back buckle and metal detailing.

He explores further and finds another pair in a similar style, but made from navy blue herringbone.

He explores further and finds another pair in a similar style, but made from navy blue herringbone.

"Oh, I like these," he says. "These satisfy my need for tweed."

 “They’re toasty,

“They’re toasty," he says, after trying on the pants. "Good for an airplane. I travel a lot, so I need something like this. I actually prefer being cold, but I can appreciate a toasty pant.”

“There’s some cool detailing, but it’s still simple. I love the asymmetrical codpiece!” he says, admiring how the front zipper of the pants veers off to the right.

“There’s some cool detailing, but it’s still simple. I love the asymmetrical codpiece!” he says, admiring how the front zipper of the pants veers off to the right.

 “I’d probably wear them with boots,

“I’d probably wear them with boots," he says. "Though these sneakers don’t look bad. These are my first pair of sneakers, you know!”

His brother worked for Nike, he says, and bought him the kicks to force him toward "expanding his options" beyond dress shoes.

Despite his love for patterns, Benjamin picks up a simple navy crew-neck sweatshirt to complete the outfit.

Despite his love for patterns, Benjamin picks up a simple navy crew-neck sweatshirt to complete the outfit.

"I try not to be too traditional," he says. "In Paris [last Fashion Week] I was running around in a sweatshirt and a lot of jewelry."

After worriedly asking whether or not a tee with a single pocket and tiny navy stripes was from last season “because it’s short-sleeve,” Benjamin chose to wear it underneath his sweatshirt, peeking out from the collar just a teeny bit.

After worriedly asking whether or not a tee with a single pocket and tiny navy stripes was from last season “because it’s short-sleeve,” Benjamin chose to wear it underneath his sweatshirt, peeking out from the collar just a teeny bit.

We learned from Benjamin, after six pronunciation attempts and a spelling lesson, that the fashion-conscious name for horizontal stripes on a shirt is mariniere. It is derived from the French word for “sailor” because 1850s French seamen wore them to stick out more visibly against the waves.  (Here are Benjamin's shirt and some sailors in mariniere, via Cadet and Wikipedia.)

We learned from Benjamin, after six pronunciation attempts and a spelling lesson, that the fashion-conscious name for horizontal stripes on a shirt is mariniere. It is derived from the French word for “sailor” because 1850s French seamen wore them to stick out more visibly against the waves. (Here are Benjamin's shirt and some sailors in mariniere, via Cadet and Wikipedia.)

Fun fact: The world’s first mariniere shirt design had exactly 21 stripes, one for each of Napoleon’s victories.

Benjamin's final outfit.

Benjamin's final outfit. "It's easy," he says. "Very grab-and-go. I'd probably pair it with a necklace."

When we met up with Benjamin-Emile Le Hay at the Williamsburg branch of Cadet, he was wearing a royal-blue blazer with a pattern of black paisley, a muted striped button-down, and a pair of very significant sneakers. We were lucky enough to catch Benjamin, who works at the New York Observer as a fashion editor and is a contributing columnist at Shindigger (meaning he gets paid to go to parties full of fancy, crazy people), the day before New York Fashion Week began. He’s attending Milan Fashion Week at the moment, tweeting about Ferragamo’s use of python.
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Shira Entis of Fleabags Goes Thrifting at Atlantis Attic

We give fashionable locals a place to go and they get All Dressed Up.

Shira outside Atlantis Attic.

Shira outside Atlantis Attic.

Shira went straight to the intimidating, thickly-packed rack of t-shirts, and scrounged up an “A#1 Grandpa!” tee and a shirt with a faded iron-on print of a cooing infant to try on. “Look at this person’s baby!” she said. Neither one made the final cut.

Shira went straight to the intimidating, thickly-packed rack of t-shirts, and scrounged up an “A#1 Grandpa!” tee and a shirt with a faded iron-on print of a cooing infant to try on. “Look at this person’s baby!” she said. Neither one made the final cut.

Shira also lingered over the jean cutoffs, lamenting that the store cut them too short. She tried on at least six pairs. “The saddest part is these jean shorts, none of them fit.”

Shira also lingered over the jean cutoffs, lamenting that the store cut them too short. She tried on at least six pairs. “The saddest part is these jean shorts, none of them fit.”

This pair says “Pussy” in glow-in-the-dark ink, and Shira did not try them on.

This pair says “Pussy” in glow-in-the-dark ink, and Shira did not try them on.

“I have come here before and spent hours accidentally,

“I have come here before and spent hours accidentally," she told us.

 “The one problem with this space is that it’s not a sure bet,” said Shira. “You strike it hot or you don’t.”

“The one problem with this space is that it’s not a sure bet,” said Shira. “You strike it hot or you don’t.”

Shira landed on a pair of Converses, having no luck with the heels and booties. “I wear Converses all the time,

Shira landed on a pair of Converses, having no luck with the heels and booties. “I wear Converses all the time," she said. "I wear them until they have holes in them."

She chose a much dressier shirt than the tees she had first been eyeing. “My mom used to have so many of these embroidered shirts,” she said. “So I think I instinctively look for them.”

She chose a much dressier shirt than the tees she had first been eyeing. “My mom used to have so many of these embroidered shirts,” she said. “So I think I instinctively look for them.”

Shira took one look at the scarf rack, and grabbed one made of speckled pink-and-brown chiffon. “I like the color pink, and it feminizes the outfit,” she said. “Otherwise, I’d look like a 12 year-old boy.”

Shira took one look at the scarf rack, and grabbed one made of speckled pink-and-brown chiffon. “I like the color pink, and it feminizes the outfit,” she said. “Otherwise, I’d look like a 12 year-old boy.”

She paired it with a forest green two-button sweater, which she also chose without much deliberation. “It’s a nice color and fit,” she said. “It feels weird shopping for sweaters now, but I wanted one.”

The purse she chose, which has a Fendi logo and cost more than twice as much as all the other bags, sparked a great debate and examination of stitching quality. “It’s got to be fake. But they are charging $30 because they think it’s real,” she said. “But what’s wrong with a fake Fendi?”

The purse she chose, which has a Fendi logo and cost more than twice as much as all the other bags, sparked a great debate and examination of stitching quality. “It’s got to be fake. But they are charging $30 because they think it’s real,” she said. “But what’s wrong with a fake Fendi?”

Is it fake? What do you think?

Is it fake? What do you think?

“I don’t know what kind of stain that is,” She said of her chosen jorts, a looser version of the pair she came in with. “But if you’re going buy something used, it’s okay. It’s part of the history of the outfit.”

“I don’t know what kind of stain that is,” She said of her chosen jorts, a looser version of the pair she came in with. “But if you’re going buy something used, it’s okay. It’s part of the history of the outfit.”

Shira’s final outfit: “This is like, what I would wear to paint a house,” she said. “I actually like this outfit.”

Shira’s final outfit: “This is like, what I would wear to paint a house,” she said. “I actually like this outfit.”

Outfit price: $10 converse + $5 shirt + $1 scarf + $5 sweater + $30 (fake) Fendi + $5 jorts = $56 total ($26 without the Fendi)

Shira Entis, co-founder of Williamsburg-based tote shop Fleabags and thrift shopper extraordinaire, met Bedford + Bowery by the Graham L wearing a Goofy t-shirt with many holes and her own sewn-on patches. She combined it with a heavy silver necklace inlaid with turquoise, frayed jorts, and a straw sunhat tied with a black ribbon.
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Annette Ramos, Stylist at Vice, Goes Black and Gold at Dusty Buttons

Introducing a new column in which we give a stylish local somewhere to go, so they can get all Dressed Up.

Annette arrives at Dusty Buttons.

Annette arrives at Dusty Buttons.

Dusty Buttons owner Amanda Loureiro measures Annette's waistline before she goes into the dressing room.

Dusty Buttons owner Amanda Loureiro measures Annette's waistline before she goes into the dressing room.

“I’m one of those people that has to look at everything before I make a decision,” says Annette.

“I’m one of those people that has to look at everything before I make a decision,” says Annette.

Other customers pop in and out while Annette shops. A woman with her long hair up in two chopstick buns, who had to text a photo to her “sugar daddy” before buying a dress she liked, complained to us about the size of her hips: “They’re good for sex, bad for standard dress sizes.”

Other customers pop in and out while Annette shops. A woman with her long hair up in two chopstick buns, who had to text a photo to her “sugar daddy” before buying a dress she liked, complained to us about the size of her hips: “They’re good for sex, bad for standard dress sizes.”

Annette leaves the dressing room and assesses her chosen dress, a 1940s-era fit-and-flare ankle dress with tailored buttons that Amanda procured from “the personal collection of a New York vintage maven.”

Annette leaves the dressing room and assesses her chosen dress, a 1940s-era fit-and-flare ankle dress with tailored buttons that Amanda procured from “the personal collection of a New York vintage maven.”

“I wear a lot of black – black and gold are my two favorite colors, and I love polka dots, so it’s perfect,” she says.

“I wear a lot of black – black and gold are my two favorite colors, and I love polka dots, so it’s perfect,” she says. "The skirt especially reminded me of a dress my grandmother used to wear.”

Annette passes over the '50s-era bustier top and matching circle skirt in the front window display, which looks like a Valentine-themed flamenco costume, but relentlessly helpful Amanda encourages her to try it on anyway.  “I feel like Lolita,” she says.

Annette passes over the '50s-era bustier top and matching circle skirt in the front window display, which looks like a Valentine-themed flamenco costume, but relentlessly helpful Amanda encourages her to try it on anyway. “I feel like Lolita,” she says.

“It’s a good thing it’s not 100 degrees out today, or you’d have to cut me out of this,” Annette yells from the dressing room. “Oh, I’ve had to cut a girl out of a dress before,” says Amanda.

“It’s a good thing it’s not 100 degrees out today, or you’d have to cut me out of this,” Annette yells from the dressing room. “Oh, I’ve had to cut a girl out of a dress before,” says Amanda. "It's just seams and threads, nothing to worry about."

Annette tries on the same strappy peeptoes in red and navy, but decides on this pair because “I just love gold so much.” They’re not vintage, but were designed by Eric Michael and shipped from Spain.

Annette tries on the same strappy peeptoes in red and navy, but decides on this pair because “I just love gold so much.” They’re not vintage, but were designed by Eric Michael and shipped from Spain.

Annette completes her outfit with a 1950s clutch that Amanda found at an estate auction. It’s reversible, with gold brocade on one side and black velvet on the other, with a gold clasp. Annette keeps the brocade side out. “The velvet is a nice little secret,” she says.

Annette completes her outfit with a 1950s clutch that Amanda found at an estate auction. It’s reversible, with gold brocade on one side and black velvet on the other, with a gold clasp. Annette keeps the brocade side out. “The velvet is a nice little secret,” she says.

Annette's two-tone final look includes the first dress she pulled off the rack, the luxurious clutch, and gold heels.

Annette's two-tone final look includes the first dress she pulled off the rack, the luxurious clutch, and gold heels.

Annette Ramos’s career as a stylist at Vice spans eight years, and started shortly after she graduated from high school on the Upper West Side (“they raised me,” she said, of the magazine). She lives in the East Village now, two blocks from Dusty Buttons — the boutique we chose for this first installment of All Dressed Up. She met us outside of the East Ninth Street shop wearing chunky high-heeled combat boots and an acid-washed denim jacket sprayed with silver paint — a look she described rather inaccurately as tomboy.
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