About Erica Martin

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This Group Wants to Unite Bushwick’s Longtimers With… Can We Say ‘Hipsters’?

via Bridging Bushwick's Facebook page.

via Bridging Bushwick’s Facebook page.

No discussion of the state of things in Bushwick would be complete without a philosophical brainstorming session on what a “hipster” is, and whether the label applies to anybody or everybody around.  On Monday night, 22 people sat in folding chairs at The Living Gallery for a round-table discussion called Bridging Bushwick, an event meant to “erase stereotypes and negative energy that surround our community,” according to its Facebook page. Two friendly cats, one black and one gray, wandered around distracting everybody.
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City OKs Parts of Greenpoint Landing; Developer Will Give Millions to Park, School

Stephen Levin at a City Council hearing last week. (Christopher DiScipio)

Stephen Levin at a City Council hearing last week. (Christopher DiScipio)

After a hearing that drew at least one celeb protester, the City Council has approved land use actions for several sections of the impending Greenpoint Landing development. The affected sites include a lot that has been donated by the developers for use as a pre-K-to-8th-grade public school. Greenpoint Landing Associates (GLA), the developers of the site, made several large modifications to their plan before the council approved it yesterday, due largely to negotiations with Greenpoint’s star Council member Stephen Levin.
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These Gents Will Serve Muffuletta Biscuits 24 Hours a Day

Tsuna and Price as they prepare for their reopening.

Tsuna and Price as they prepare for their reopening.

Earlier this week, Empire Biscuit opened at 198 Avenue A, near East 12th Street, and began peddling biscuits in every imaginable form (as a sandwich, slathered in gravy, or topped with an impossibly eclectic selection of spreads and jams); the demand was so great that owners Jonathan Price and Yonadav Tsuna ran out of major menu items and had to close early. They’re taking the weekend to regroup, but come this Tuesday, with an expanded staff and a bolstered inventory, they’ll officially be open 24 hours a day.
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The East Village Just Got an Anti-Banker Bar Named After the Hero of Fight Club

(Photo: Erica Martin)

(Photo: Erica Martin)

A Fight Club-themed bar called Durden opened last night in Nightingale Lounge’s former space on 13th and Second Ave (right near the forthcoming Westside Market), but don’t stop by expecting any soap outside of the bathroom or jeans stolen from a laundromat on display. The bar is movie paraphernalia-free, and the Master of Mayhem himself only appears once, as part of a mural that owner Eddie Sherman commissioned Masterpiece NYC to paint along the room’s right-hand wall.
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Domino Developers Ask City to Change Affordable Housing Rules

DOMINO_BIRDS-EYE-VIEW

Demolition of the Domino Factory is just about underway, and Two Trees has every permit and rezoning it needs to move forward with construction of its waterfront apartments. But on Friday afternoon, the Department of Housing Preservation and Development held a hearing about a rule change proposed by Two Trees that would affect the tax breaks for developers who create affordable housing. This has agitated activists who oppose the “poor door” measures that some recent developments are accused of taking, from The Edge to Northside Piers to the impending Greenpoint Landing.
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The Closing Ceremony of The Portals Involved Gypsy Centries, Tallbikes and the Goddesses of Death

Portal 13, The Genesis of Life.  (All photos by Scott Lynch)

Portal 13, The Genesis of Life. (All photos by Scott Lynch)

A gypsy-sentry.

A gypsy-sentry.

Susannah Pryce and her fingernails.

Susannah Pryce and her fingernails.

Kiss Slash Crooked Smile performing upstairs.

Kiss Slash Crooked Smile performing upstairs.

Light show.

Light show.

Angel Eyedealism before her performance.

Angel Eyedealism before her performance.

Portal 4, The Manifestation of the Material World.

Portal 4, The Manifestation of the Material World.

Nap.

Nap.

Justin Riley's sculpture-bike.

Justin Riley's sculpture-bike.

Mbira instruments.

Mbira instruments.

Behind the portal.

Behind the portal.

A Goddess of Death inside the portal.

A Goddess of Death inside the portal.

The chamber of rebirth.

The chamber of rebirth.

There's a person in there.

There's a person in there.

Waiting for a chance at the portal.

Waiting for a chance at the portal.

Portal 13, The Genesis of Life.  (All photos by Scott Lynch)A gypsy-sentry.Susannah Pryce and her fingernails.Kiss Slash Crooked Smile performing upstairs.Light show.Angel Eyedealism before her performance.Portal 4, The Manifestation of the Material World.Nap.Justin Riley's sculpture-bike.Mbira instruments.Behind the portal.A Goddess of Death inside the portal.The chamber of rebirth.There's a person in there.Waiting for a chance at the portal.

“I’m a fire dancer,” said Susannah Pryce, who was lurking about the front stairs of the Sixth Street Community Center on Saturday night, dressed as the Goddess of Death. For her role as a macabre guide to the finale of the 13 Portals, she wore glowing face paint, a black cloak, and six-inch fingernails made of curling brown beans. After explaining how she regularly performs at bars with an on-fire instrument that looks like “the bones of a giant geisha fan,” Pryce told us: “Tonight’s portal is about rebirth. And that’s why I’m here. Because everybody has to die to be reborn.”
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This Fashion Editor Has a Need for Tweed, So We Took Him to Cadet

We give fashionable locals a place to go and they get All Dressed Up.

Benjamin surveys his options at Cadet. (All photos: Lauren Smith)

Benjamin surveys his options at Cadet. (All photos: Lauren Smith)

 “I'm very big on patterns,

“I'm very big on patterns," says Benjamin, in his paisley blazer.

“I have a love-hate relationship with denim. Meaning I actually hate it. But I want to love it,” he says, examining a pair of jeans inspired by '50s aviator pants (according to Brad), with a back buckle and metal detailing.

“I have a love-hate relationship with denim. Meaning I actually hate it. But I want to love it,” he says, examining a pair of jeans inspired by '50s aviator pants (according to Brad), with a back buckle and metal detailing.

He explores further and finds another pair in a similar style, but made from navy blue herringbone.

He explores further and finds another pair in a similar style, but made from navy blue herringbone.

"Oh, I like these," he says. "These satisfy my need for tweed."

 “They’re toasty,

“They’re toasty," he says, after trying on the pants. "Good for an airplane. I travel a lot, so I need something like this. I actually prefer being cold, but I can appreciate a toasty pant.”

“There’s some cool detailing, but it’s still simple. I love the asymmetrical codpiece!” he says, admiring how the front zipper of the pants veers off to the right.

“There’s some cool detailing, but it’s still simple. I love the asymmetrical codpiece!” he says, admiring how the front zipper of the pants veers off to the right.

 “I’d probably wear them with boots,

“I’d probably wear them with boots," he says. "Though these sneakers don’t look bad. These are my first pair of sneakers, you know!”

His brother worked for Nike, he says, and bought him the kicks to force him toward "expanding his options" beyond dress shoes.

Despite his love for patterns, Benjamin picks up a simple navy crew-neck sweatshirt to complete the outfit.

Despite his love for patterns, Benjamin picks up a simple navy crew-neck sweatshirt to complete the outfit.

"I try not to be too traditional," he says. "In Paris [last Fashion Week] I was running around in a sweatshirt and a lot of jewelry."

After worriedly asking whether or not a tee with a single pocket and tiny navy stripes was from last season “because it’s short-sleeve,” Benjamin chose to wear it underneath his sweatshirt, peeking out from the collar just a teeny bit.

After worriedly asking whether or not a tee with a single pocket and tiny navy stripes was from last season “because it’s short-sleeve,” Benjamin chose to wear it underneath his sweatshirt, peeking out from the collar just a teeny bit.

We learned from Benjamin, after six pronunciation attempts and a spelling lesson, that the fashion-conscious name for horizontal stripes on a shirt is mariniere. It is derived from the French word for “sailor” because 1850s French seamen wore them to stick out more visibly against the waves.  (Here are Benjamin's shirt and some sailors in mariniere, via Cadet and Wikipedia.)

We learned from Benjamin, after six pronunciation attempts and a spelling lesson, that the fashion-conscious name for horizontal stripes on a shirt is mariniere. It is derived from the French word for “sailor” because 1850s French seamen wore them to stick out more visibly against the waves. (Here are Benjamin's shirt and some sailors in mariniere, via Cadet and Wikipedia.)

Fun fact: The world’s first mariniere shirt design had exactly 21 stripes, one for each of Napoleon’s victories.

Benjamin's final outfit.

Benjamin's final outfit. "It's easy," he says. "Very grab-and-go. I'd probably pair it with a necklace."

Benjamin surveys his options at Cadet. (All photos: Lauren Smith)“I'm very big on patterns," says Benjamin, in his paisley blazer.“I have a love-hate relationship with denim. Meaning I actually hate it. But I want to love it,” he says, examining a pair of jeans inspired by '50s aviator pants (according to Brad), with a back buckle and metal detailing."Oh, I like these," he says. "These satisfy my need for tweed."“They’re toasty," he says, after trying on the pants. "Good for an airplane. I travel a lot, so I need something like this. I actually prefer being cold, but I can appreciate a toasty pant.”“There’s some cool detailing, but it’s still simple. I love the asymmetrical codpiece!” he says, admiring how the front zipper of the pants veers off to the right.His brother worked for Nike, he says, and bought him the kicks to force him toward "expanding his options" beyond dress shoes.Despite his love for patterns, Benjamin picks up a simple navy crew-neck sweatshirt to complete the outfit.After worriedly asking whether or not a tee with a single pocket and tiny navy stripes was from last season “because it’s short-sleeve,” Benjamin chose to wear it underneath his sweatshirt, peeking out from the collar just a teeny bit.Fun fact: The world’s first mariniere shirt design had exactly 21 stripes, one for each of Napoleon’s victories.Benjamin's final outfit. "It's easy," he says. "Very grab-and-go. I'd probably pair it with a necklace."

When we met up with Benjamin-Emile Le Hay at the Williamsburg branch of Cadet, he was wearing a royal-blue blazer with a pattern of black paisley, a muted striped button-down, and a pair of very significant sneakers. We were lucky enough to catch Benjamin, who works at the New York Observer as a fashion editor and is a contributing columnist at Shindigger (meaning he gets paid to go to parties full of fancy, crazy people), the day before New York Fashion Week began. He’s attending Milan Fashion Week at the moment, tweeting about Ferragamo’s use of python.
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Fashion Weekend Photos: ‘Who Said Williamsburg Isn’t Cool Anymore?’

Ramono Martelli of ShocKVintage prepping a model. (All photos by Ebru Yildiz)

Ramono Martelli of ShocKVintage prepping a model. (All photos by Ebru Yildiz)

A ShocKVintage model making mental preparations.

A ShocKVintage model making mental preparations.

Two ShocKVintage models adjusting.

Two ShocKVintage models adjusting.

A FoXXy Face Couture model, shortly after his oil-rubbing comment.

A FoXXy Face Couture model, shortly after his oil-rubbing comment.

Williamsburg Fashion Weekend founder Arthur Arbit.

Williamsburg Fashion Weekend founder Arthur Arbit.

Shute Organic by Amanda Isaac.

Shute Organic by Amanda Isaac.

Shute Organic by Amanda Isaac.

Shute Organic by Amanda Isaac.

Shute Organic models, including Gerald Cotiangco.

Shute Organic models, including Gerald Cotiangco.

Shute Organic by Amanda Isaac.

Shute Organic by Amanda Isaac.

Atmosphere.

Atmosphere.

ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.

ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.

ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.

ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.

ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.

ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.

ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.

ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.

IQ Test by Melissa Lockwood.

IQ Test by Melissa Lockwood.

IQ Test by Melissa Lockwood.

IQ Test by Melissa Lockwood.

Designer Melissa Lockwood and her models.

Designer Melissa Lockwood and her models.

SDN by Marcus Hicks.

SDN by Marcus Hicks.

SDN by Marcus Hicks.

SDN by Marcus Hicks.

FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.

FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.

FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.

FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.

FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.

FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.

FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.

FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.

Geary Marcello and his models.

Geary Marcello and his models.

Ramono Martelli of ShocKVintage prepping a model. (All photos by Ebru Yildiz)A ShocKVintage model making mental preparations.Two ShocKVintage models adjusting.A FoXXy Face Couture model, shortly after his oil-rubbing comment.Williamsburg Fashion Weekend founder Arthur Arbit.Shute Organic by Amanda Isaac.Shute Organic by Amanda Isaac.Shute Organic models, including Gerald Cotiangco.Shute Organic by Amanda Isaac.Atmosphere.ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.ShocKVintage by Ramono Martelli.IQ Test by Melissa Lockwood.IQ Test by Melissa Lockwood.Designer Melissa Lockwood and her models.SDN by Marcus Hicks.SDN by Marcus Hicks.FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.FoXXy Face Couture by Geary Marcello.Geary Marcello and his models.

On the second night of Williamsburg Fashion Weekend, Geary Marcello prepped his models while wearing a purple plaid schoolgirl skirt over his pants and a three-inch spike through his septum.

“It’s about New York in the ’70s, in the disco era, when everything was whimsical and a novelty, but still had edginess,” said the bubbly designer of his FoXXy Face Couture line. “My shows have been called controversial, but I’m not trying to be controversial about sexuality or politics or anything else. It’s about creating a feeling.”
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Party in the Face of Domino’s Impending Doom Tomorrow

(image via Save Domino's press release)

(image via Save Domino’s press release)

The Domino Sugar Factory’s demolition is scheduled to start this month, but opposition organization Save Domino isn’t quite ready to throw in the towel. What to do when protests, community organizing, and dissident light displays have all failed to get results? Throw a rager, of course.
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Brooklyn’s Tiniest DJ Will Spin On Orchard Street This Sunday

DJ Kai performing at this past June's Daylife. (via LES BID)

DJ Kai performing at this past June’s Daylife. (via LES BID)

Until the Lower East Side’s favorite Brooklyn-born, nine-year-old DJ manages to break from the shackles of his 10 p.m. bedtime, fans can only catch Kai Song spinning while the sun is wholly up. Naturally this would make him an institution at Daylife, the neighborhood’s sort-of-semi-annual three-block bash, which has its final hurrah of the season this Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.
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Drag Queen Macy Rodman Thinks Bushwick Is Getting Gayer and Gayer

Macy Rodman performing at Sugarland. (Photo: Christopher John Conry)

Macy Rodman performing at Sugarland. (Photo: Christopher John Conry)

This Saturday, drag queens from all five boroughs and beyond will gather at Secret Project Robot to outdo one another in their costumes, performance innovation, and general obscenity at Bushwig, the neighborhood’s second annual festival of drag. The emcee of the fest will be Bushwick-based queen Macy Rodman, who in April won North Brooklyn’s first drag pageant, an eight-week long performance showdown called Mr(s) Williamsburg.
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