About Emily Colucci

Posts by Emily Colucci:

Here’s Who’ll Be Reppin’ Brooklyn and LES at Miami Art Week

ABMB2010In case you couldn’t tell from all the status updates about packing for 75 degree weather, it’s time again for Miami Art Week, when all the galleries that have been popping up in North Brooklyn and the Lower East Side pop down to Miami Beach. From the massive blue chip affair that is Art Basel to the almost entirely LES-populated NADA, mapping out an itinerary can seem overwhelming — and increasingly impossible, with more and more fairs appearing each year. But whatever, this is the opportunity to catch up on the downtown and Brooklyn art scenes while refreshing your tan. Here’s who to look out for this year.
Keep Reading »

Think Your Commute Is Bad? Step Into the Shoes of a Jakartan Subway Surfer

(Courtesy Brian Duggan and ISCP, New York)

(Courtesy Brian Duggan and ISCP, New York)

August is normally a barren wasteland of shuttered galleries on summer vacation, but the North Brooklyn art scene has been reinvigorated by a powerful experiential exhibition ripped from the global headlines.

Dublin-based artist Brian Duggan’s site-specific installation We like it up here, it’s windy, really nice at East Williamsburg’s International Studio & Curatorial Program, where he’s currently a resident, offers a glimpse into the shocking crowd control techniques on the trains in Indonesia.

Duggan was “shocked and amazed” when he read about a 2012 initiative by the state-owned railway company, PT Kereta Api, to control the amount of passengers that ride on the train roofs due to overcrowding by hanging large medieval-looking concrete balls above the train lines to knock them off.
Keep Reading »

Ron Athey Puts Away the Torture Rack and Busts Out Some Pens and Typewriters

Ron Athey (in blue shorts) observes the participants. (Emily Colucci)

Ron Athey (in blue shorts) observes the participants. (Emily Colucci)

Automatic writing in process. (Photo: Emily Colucci)

Automatic writing in process. (Photo: Emily Colucci)

A typist transcribing the previous day's writing. (Photo: Emily Colucci)

A typist transcribing the previous day's writing. (Photo: Emily Colucci)

(Photo: Emily Colucci)

(Photo: Emily Colucci)

The writers became a part of the performance (Emily Colucci)

The writers became a part of the performance (Emily Colucci)

Writing from Tuesday's workshop (Photo: Emily Colucci)

Writing from Tuesday's workshop (Photo: Emily Colucci)

(Photo: Emily Colucci)

(Photo: Emily Colucci)

Many maneuvered through the space in their bare feet. (Emily Colucci)

Many maneuvered through the space in their bare feet. (Emily Colucci)

After the workshop. (Photo: Emily Colucci)

After the workshop. (Photo: Emily Colucci)

Ron Athey (in blue shorts) observes the participants. (Emily Colucci)Automatic writing in process. (Photo: Emily Colucci)A typist transcribing the previous day's writing. (Photo: Emily Colucci)(Photo: Emily Colucci)The writers became a part of the performance (Emily Colucci)Writing from Tuesday's workshop (Photo: Emily Colucci)(Photo: Emily Colucci)Many maneuvered through the space in their bare feet. (Emily Colucci)After the workshop. (Photo: Emily Colucci)
Like a descent into the cut-up mind of William S. Burroughs, a cacophony of typewriter and pen strokes filled Participant, Inc. as one of the world’s most extreme performance artists led a small group in his latest creation.
Keep Reading »

Another Chelsea Gallery Is Moving to the Lower East Side

(Photo: Emily Colucci)

(Photo: Emily Colucci)

In what’s quickly becoming the art-world trend of the summer, another Chelsea gallery is heading downtown.

Following in the footsteps of Klemens Gasser & Tanja Grunert, Inc., Monya Rowe Gallery is leaving its second-floor space on West 22nd Street. Rowe says she was looking to “increase the visibility of the gallery by moving to a ground-floor space, and this one on the Lower East Side became available at the right time.”
Keep Reading »

Watch a Creepy Clown Reenact Rand Paul’s 13-Hour Filibuster (Yep, All of It)

When Rand Paul spoke for nearly 13 hours against the nomination of CIA director John Brennan and Wendy Davis railed for more than 11 hours against HB2, they weren’t clowning around.

Not so much with Rachel Mason. The artist and musician has turned Paul’s epic filibuster into political theater, as it were, by dressing up as one of her signature characters, FutureClown, and reenacting the 13-hour stand in a video now on view at Envoy Enterprises. And she’s not done yet: on Wednesday, FutureClown will perform a surprise filibuster from history in the basement of the Lower East Side gallery.
Keep Reading »

Deborah Brown Is Showing on the LES While Going Big in Bushwick

Tonight, some of Deborah Brown’s bright, surreal, almost abstract paintings — inspired by the Bushwick landscape — will be featured in the opening of a group exhibition at the Lesley Heller Workspace on the Lower East Side.

Though the artist shows downtown (she’ll be back at Lesley Heller for a solo exhibition in February), few things represent the explosion of the Bushwick gallery scene more dramatically than the big move she’s making there.
Keep Reading »

Olek Swaddled a Car in Yarn, and That Was Really Just the Beginning of Open Canvas

"Forgotten Barrier"

Olek's response to the prompt "Transform Today" was this crocheted mural, which read "All we need is love and money."

"Olek Bike"

Brooklyn-based street artist Olek displayed three pieces on North 6th, including her recognizable crocheted bike.

"Auto Install"

Maybe the most incredible piece of the Open Canvas event was Olek's completely crocheted van.

"Auto Install"

A view from the front.

Posters

Posters

Both sides of North 6th were plastered with posters from artists such as Justin Beal, Michael Zahn and tattoo artist JK5.

Posters

Posters

A finished section of posters on the south side of North 6th Street

"Magnus Salo (The Big Surge)"

Brooklyn-based multidisciplinary artist ROSTARR is known for his signature calligraphic lines, which he painted in acrylic above Music Hall of Williamsburg.

"Magnus Salo (The Big Surge)"

ROSTARR's mural was undoubtedly the highest public art piece of the Open Canvas Initiative.

"Consider Yourself Warned"

Craig Damrauer's work featured barely legible stenciled phrases warning viewers about fireworks, scams and other dangers, which he was covered with layers of paint.

Passersby

Passersby

Williamsburg passersby look at Danish photographer Asger Carlsen's surreal vinyl photographs that he pasted on a construction fence.

"Air Current(s)"

Mark Nystrom used data collected about wind speed and direction to create his seemingly abstract circles. Each ring corresponds to one hour of wind data.

"Mirror, Peephole"

Andrew Kuo's "Mirror, Peephole" featured many appropriated Internet cat photographs.

"Mirror, Peephole."

New York artist Andrew Kuo and team installed his selection of random images from the Internet on glass storefront windows.

By Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe

By Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe

Freeman and Lowe, known for their immersive installations, based their work off of the cult 1970s sci-fi film "The Star Chamber."

"Memories, Landscapes and Other Lies."

New York-based artist Ara Dymond scraped the paint off the wall that was primed for the Open Canvas event, creating this textural mural.

Olek's response to the prompt "Transform Today" was this crocheted mural, which read "All we need is love and money."Brooklyn-based street artist Olek displayed three pieces on North 6th, including her recognizable crocheted bike.Maybe the most incredible piece of the Open Canvas event was Olek's completely crocheted van.A view from the front.Both sides of North 6th were plastered with posters from artists such as Justin Beal, Michael Zahn and tattoo artist JK5.A finished section of posters on the south side of North 6th StreetBrooklyn-based multidisciplinary artist ROSTARR is known for his signature calligraphic lines, which he painted in acrylic above Music Hall of Williamsburg.ROSTARR's mural was undoubtedly the highest public art piece of the Open Canvas Initiative.Craig Damrauer's work featured barely legible stenciled phrases warning viewers about fireworks, scams and other dangers, which he was covered with layers of paint.Williamsburg passersby look at Danish photographer Asger Carlsen's surreal vinyl photographs that he pasted on a construction fence.Mark Nystrom used data collected about wind speed and direction to create his seemingly abstract circles. Each ring corresponds to one hour of wind data.Andrew Kuo's "Mirror, Peephole" featured many appropriated Internet cat photographs.New York artist Andrew Kuo and team installed his selection of random images from the Internet on glass storefront windows.Freeman and Lowe, known for their immersive installations, based their work off of the cult 1970s sci-fi film "The Star Chamber."New York-based artist Ara Dymond scraped the paint off the wall that was primed for the Open Canvas event, creating this textural mural.

This past weekend, North 6th Street exploded with energy as more than 20 artists chosen by Absolut’s Open Canvas Initiative transformed a Williamsburg block of storefronts, construction fences and bare walls into colorful, stunning murals. Prompted to “Transform Today,” the artists, who were mostly from the Brooklyn area, worked with a wide variety of materials and mediums — starting with yarn.

Click through our slideshow to see how the event unspooled.