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Bushwick’s Living Gallery Opens an East Village Outpost With BYO Art

(Courtesy of The Living Gallery)

Back in June, when Joseph Meloy and Alexandria Hodgkins saw an ad for a storefront at 53 Avenue B, they fell in love with the building, and understandably so: it’s light purple and its facade has palm tree, heart and animal shapes cast by the landlord, Antonio Echeverri. Within days, the married couple and their business partner, Nyssa Frank, had rented the 250-square-foot storefront to use as a Manhattan outpost of their Bushwick gallery, The Living Space.

Meloy, a native Lower East Sider, felt good about bringing a new art space “back home.”

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One of the City’s Trippiest Troupes, Company XIV, Has Found a New Home in Bushwick

For the past years, Company XIV has twirled, leaped and pranced– and not just during their bawdy, outre reimaginings of Snow White and The Nutcracker. Ever since the circus-burlesque-opera ensemble lost their Gowanus home due to flooding in 2012, they’ve moved every season, performing at Colonnade Row in NoHo, at Minetta Lane Theatre in the West Village, at the Irondale Theatre in Fort Greene and, most recently, at the Slipper Room.

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Toshi Salvino Is a ‘Living Doll’– and Definitely Not the American Girl Kind

(Photo: Kassandra Leigh)

When Toshi Salvino met me at a café in East Williamsburg, she sported wide-striped tights, chunky platform boots, black shorts, and a black t-shirt portraying an aurora-colored robotic goddess courtesy of Heather Hermann, an artist who worked under Yoshitaka Amano. Her bubblegum-pink hair was coiffed in a casual updo, and embellished by several ribbon-shaped barrettes. She had dotted her face with freckles and her eye makeup was vaguely reminiscent of Natalie Portman’s Black Swan; she wore a mauve metallic lipstick, which would make any other person look like Laura Palmer’s corpse.

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Japan Touched Down in Brooklyn via This Crosscultural Arts Fest

(Photos: Angelica Frey)

This past weekend, Japanophiles got their fix at Tokyo x Brooklyn, which brought a heaping helping of kawaii to the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint. 

The festival was the brainchild of a man who goes by MARS, the CEO of the Tokyo-based animation studio and creative ad agency Hot Zipang. MARS realized that Americans, happy to eat frankensushi in the ’80s, have since become more attuned to Japanese culture, to the degree that umami is now a part of their vocabulary. He decided this was a good time to showcase the country’s offerings.

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Cotton Candy Machine Sends Out Distress Signal as W-burg Water Gets Brackish

Cotton Candy Machine. (Photo: Angelica Frey)

Cotton Candy Machine. (Photo: Angelica Frey)

Cotton Candy Machine, the South Williamsburg gallery owned by painter Tara McPherson and her partner Sean Leonard, is sending out a call for help. “Cotton Candy Machine needs your support,” reads an Instagram caption. “We just celebrated our 4 year anniversary here at the Art Boutique and Gallery and they say the first 5 years are the hardest for a small business. I hope the hardest years are behind us, but right now we need your help.”

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Musical Saw Festival Is Going Be Amazing Any Way You Slice It

SawfestSaws aren’t just for Texas chainsaw massacres — they can also be put to use by musicians, as the New York City Musical Saw Festival will show. Now in its eleventh edition, the event, presented by Natalia “Saw Lady” Paruz, will gather about 50 saw players from all over the world, from a 95-year-old who’s been playing for 75 years to a saw savant who’ll join the Astoria Symphonic Choir for a rendition of Mozart’s “Ave Verum Corpus.”

Composer Scott Munson, who wrote the soundtrack of Another Earth, will present a new arrangement of his work, where the saw will be accompanied by bells. There’ll be an orchestra of 20 players from Japan and, for the first time, a British “invasion,” with six participants coming from the United Kingdom.

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How a Bushwick Art Witch Taught Me to ‘Own My Fruit’

(Photos: Angelica Frey)

Molly Burkett. (Photos: Angelica Frey)

I was lying on a yoga mat in a Bushwick loft with two quartz minerals on either side of my head, when the “art witch” placed a selenite crystal just below my chest. I had just gone through a soul-searching tarot reading session in which a preponderance of pentacles revealed that I had to be more systematic and less feverish about pursuing my goals, while the ace of wands (with its phallic symbology) insured I had the “fire” to keep going.

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‘We Call It Mutt Food’: Pokito Now Serving Latin-Asian in South Williamsburg

pokito food 1The group of Pratt alums who opened Pokito were tired of the typical Williamsburg look — “it’s all the re-claimed woods, steel, dark, all the Edison filament bulbs,” said Alex Kleinberg — so they opened a spot on South 4th Street that has a clean, sleek, tile-and-marble dining room where LED lights emitting a rainbow-like glow.

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Art Openings: Twisted Fairy Tales, Drug Tourists and More

Time again for our weekly roundup of what’s new on the art scene.

Rosebud Berlewi

Art by Brice Brown

Buccaneer, Masquerade, Suspence, Abundance, Thorn, Champion. Recent works by Brice Brown
April 17 (opening reception 7-9pm) to May 23 at Air Circulation, 160 Randolph St., Bushwick.
Kentucky-born artist Brice Brown created a multi-part installation meant to present a fragmented experienece of the still life genre as a way to explore “the dichotomous impulses inherent in the act of domestication: containment and freedom; restraint and release; a need for chaos and a need for order,” per the artist’s statement.  The installation, largely consisting of archival pigment prints, wallpaper design and soft sculpture, draws from The Batsford Colour Book of Roses (1962) and pages from an early 20th century fruit and seed catalog. References to the letterhead design of constructivist-influenced masters such as Piet Zwart are embedded in the pieces.

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