Search Results for : landmark sunshine cinema

No Comments

EV Art Store Closing After 111 Years; Sunshine Cinema Expands Uptown

After eleven decades in business, New York Central Art Supply on 3rd Avenue will shutter later this summer. [Vanishing NY]

A real estate investment firm purchased two buildings at 192-194 First Avenue for a combined $13 million. [The Real Deal]

Houston Street’s Landmark Sunshine Cinema will  get a sibling this spring on W. 57th Street. [The Real Deal]

This weekend at SIGNAL gallery, the Bushwick Art Book and Zine Fair returns to the neighborhood for its fourth year. [Hyperallergic]

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Film: Dangle for Expanded Cinema and See Marnie’s BF Looking Not So Hot

Iraqi Odyssey 
Thursday Dec. 3, 6:05 pm and 9:20 pm at IFC Center, 323 6th Avenue: $14
How much do you know about Iraq, like really? Take away the Gulf War, Saddam Hussein, and our 43rd President’s awful pronunciation of the name belonging to a country that’s informed so much public discussion in the past few decades (but so little real understanding), and we’re guessing the answer is: not so much. Iraqi ex-pat filmmaker Samir takes viewers on an informative trip through his homeland’s history through a very personal lens, his family tree.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Houston Street Theater Sold; Ovenly to Expand to Williamsburg

Jon P. Waulters, a 50-year-old Bushwick resident, was arrested Wednesday after attempting five Gotham bank robberies this week. [Bushwick Daily]

Landmark Sunshine Cinema was purchased for $31.5 million and will shutter in January, clearing the way for a retail and office development. [NY Post]

Paperwork was submitted for an 11-story, 104-room hotel planned for Bedford Avenue between S. 4th and 5th Streets. [The Real Deal] Keep Reading »

No Comments

LES Residents Are ‘Rent Burdened’; Cookie Pantsuit For Hillary

According to the real estate brokerage firm MNS, Lower East Side tenants are among the city’s most “rent burdened” because on average, household incomes are lower than many other neighborhoods. Residents paying more than 30 percent of their monthly income on rent are considered rent burdened. [DNA Info]

Meanwhile, tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., financial and real estate professional (including notorious landlord Ben Shaoul) will participate in a talk at Landmark Sunshine Cinema called, “L.E.S. is MORE.” [Jeremiah’s Vanishing NY]

Bushwick-based photographer Delphine Diallo collaborated with Shepard Fairey on a portrait that will be used prominently in “We The People,” an Amplifier Foundation-backed social justice campaign kicking off on Inauguration Day. [Bushwick Daily]
Keep Reading »

No Comments

Bushwick Coffee Shop Owner Denies Anti-Semitism; Inside a $6.5M Firehouse

Marc Cram Concepts, at First Street Green

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

Michael Avila—owner of The Coffee Shop in Bushwick—is being accused of anti-Semitism because of a rant against Jewish landlords who “function via greed and dominance.” He says he was “misunderstood” and is merely “anti-Zionism.” [DNA Info]

This week paperwork was submitted for the latest building in the forthcoming Essex Crossing development, a 26-story mixed-use structure at 115 Delancey Street. [The Real Deal]

Former Greenpoint record store Permanent Records opened in its new location Wednesday, in the South Slope. [Brooklyn Vegan]
Keep Reading »

No Comments

Breakfast and a Movie? Alamo Brooklyn Is Now Doing Brunch

With Sunshine Cinema closing, NYC’s cinephiles need all the good news they can get. Here’s a little ray of, er, sunshine: Alamo Drafthouse Brooklyn is adding brunch service.

Alamo isn’t the first NYC theater to do brunch–in fact, on May 27, Nitehawk is hosting an E.T. themed one to celebrate 35 years of phoning home. But we’re happy to see an addition to the brunch bunch.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Week in Film: ‘Supernatural Comedy,’ Women Rule the World, and More


The Lost City Of Z

Now through Thursday May 11 at Sunshine Cinema: $14

I haven’t seen The Lost City of Z just yet, but what I can tell you is that the film takes place in 1925, a tumultuous time in the Western world when it looked like the sun might very well start to set on the British Empire. In fact, imperial order was starting to collapse around the globe, and would eventually be replaced by a new bipolar world order– divvied up into two supposedly opposite political instincts, nationalism and socialism. (If that sounds like a super mysterious process, that’s because it is. There are tons of fascinating theories about how and why this happened, and about WTF nationalism even is, man– none of which I will go into here.) So even though a bunch of landowning white men still ruled the day at this point, they were probably feeling a little insecure about their privileged position, which they justified by an unshakeable belief in white supremacy and fashionable pseudoscientific ideas/total BS concepts of the time. I mean, now we know that terms like “imperial expansion” and “colonization” are just fancy ways to talk about pirate stuff (e.g., raping, pillaging). Oh, and racism too.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Tribeca Talks Lineup: Bruce Springsteen, Lena Dunham, Noah Baumbach, and More

The Tribeca Film Festival unveiled its lineup a few weeks ago, and now comes the second big reveal: the lineup of Tribeca Talks, which last year featured J.J. Abrams and Francis Ford Coppola, among others. If you couldn’t bring yourself to shell out $1,000 to see Bruce Springsteen on his book tour, well, good news: You’ll have a chance to see him for a smidge less ($40) when tickets for his talk with America’s other sweetheart, Tom Hanks, go on sale tomorrow, March 21, at Tribeca’s site. The convo will happen April 28 at the Beacon Theatre.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Film Alert: a Witch Most Skillful in Blood-Lusty Sex Magic, James Baldwin Redux, and More


The Love Witch
Thursday December 15, 4:15 pm at Nitehawk: $12

If you can play hooky this afternoon, do. Your first hideout should be Nitehawk’s last screening of The Love Witch, which (witch?) I’m kicking myself for not getting to until now. I blame it all on Anna Biller– the filmmaker has done such a convincing job of making this throwback film look like an actual piece of vintage sexploitation that, for-realsies, even after several once-overs I failed to realize is actually a brand new movie that I should definitely be paying attention to. I mean, even the movie poster (see below) looks exactly like an airbrushed box-office placard advertising some cheap-o, long-forgotten ’70s erotic thriller.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Week in Film: a Handmaiden’s S&M Tale and Prison Twelve Ways


The Prison in Twelve Landscapes
Friday November 4, 7 pm and 9:15 pm and through Wednesday November 9 at Anthology Film Archives: $11

This documentary explores the far-reaching consequences of incarceration across the United States, without ever setting foot inside the prison proper. It’s a fascinating take on the impact of the prison system from a different perspective than the one we’re used to, in which the cameras are literally being behind bars. Instead, the subject is approached through absence and invisibility, from the parallel infrastructures that bring food and supplies into penitentiaries to women prisoners fighting forest fires in California.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Week in Film: Slippery Suffocaters and a Skin-tastic Japanese Pink Film Redux

(Flyer via Spectacle)

(Flyer via Spectacle)

Daydream
Saturday October 14,  midnight at Spectacle: $5

Throughout the month of October, Spectacle is running a series on Pink Film, a Japanese cinematic movement that began in the groovy ’60s– a time when counterculture thrived in Japan and, just like the U.S. and France and other countries across the world, ideas about free love and experimental art-making began to take hold.

According to the theater, this is “the largest and most comprehensive [retrospective] of its kind in North America” and covers Pink’s evolution from start to present. Sick.

Keep Reading »