Search Results for : anthology film archives

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From Mobsters to Mekas: A Courthouse’s Second Act as Anthology Film Archives

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Courtesy of AnthologyFilmArchives.org.

The building at the southeast corner of Second Avenue and Second Street that now houses the Anthology Film Archives has always been a crossroads, both symbolically and literally. This “international center for the preservation, study and exhibition of film and video” came into being in 1969 as a counter-thrust to Hollywood, making its focus American independent and avant-garde cinema.

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Anthology Film Archives Seeks Expansion Approval; Rififi Returns to the EV via HBO

Alleging that a six-story, Second Avenue property he owns has been “commandeered” by a real estate investor/developer, landlord Raphael Toledano is seeking Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. [Commercial Observer]

Today, Anthology Film Archives will present the latest version of its decades-delayed expansion plan to the Landmarks Preservation Commission. [NY Yimby]

French bar/eatery Brigitte will debut next month at 37 Canal Street, which was last occupied two years ago by Icelandic spot Skál. [Bowery Boogie] Keep Reading »

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Patti Smith Sang Some Lou Reed at a Gala For Anthology Film Archives’ Expansion

Video courtesy of Jonas Mekas

I don’t know about you, but galas are not an everyday thing around these parts– the closest this reporter’s been to a real black-tie-and-gown affair was high school prom, which didn’t even really happen because my date got arrested. So needless to say, when I was somehow allowed to crash the Anthology Film Archives gala –a fancy fundraising party and art auction held last week to raise cash for the theater’s expansion– I was just slightly out of my realm. It was made all the more surreal by a performance from Patti Smith, and seeing people like John Waters, Zosia Mamet, and Zac Posen’s eyebrows all in one room.

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Anthology Film Archives Adding New Library and Café, With Help from Sparkly Art Auction

Jonas Mekas and Andy Warhol (Courtesy Stephen Shore / Anthology Film Archives)

Jonas Mekas, co-founder of Anthology Film Archives with Andy Warhol (Courtesy Stephen Shore / Anthology Film Archives)

Yesterday, Anthology Film Archives announced that, for the first time in their 46-year history, big changes are coming to the institution in the form of an expansion to their East Village operations that will include a library and café.

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Point Break at Anthology Film Archives

If you can’t catch a wave over this Fourth of July weekend, check out Anthology Film Archives’ screening of this 1991 surf classic starring Keanu Reeves and Patrick Swayze. Check anthologyfilmarchives.org/ for times.

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18th Annual Bicycle Film Festival Returns for the City’s Cycling Creatives

(Image credit: Bicycle Film Festival)

New York’s long-standing Bicycle Film Festival returns for a whopping eighteenth year between June 19-24 at Anthology Film Archives. It’s a whirlwind gathering of biking and film buffs that brings together the urban cycling community not only in New York, but also around the globe. The festival has hosted more than one million cycling enthusiasts in ninety-plus cities. Keep Reading »

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Anthology Unveils Basquiat-Inspired Film Series Curated By Jarmusch, Fab 5 Freddy, and More

Downtown 81.

A while back we revealed that East Village cultural space Howl! Happening would be presenting an exhibition to coincide with the release of Sara Driver’s new Basquait documentary, Boom For Real: The Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Now Howl!’s neighbor, Anthology Film Archives, sends over the lineup for the film series that will coincide with the exhibit. The cinema is going all out for this one, dividing the series into a two parts. One is dedicated to films by or about Basquiat, as well as some contemporary films; the other features overlooked or personally influential films of the era picked by Driver, hip-hop legend Fab 5 Freddy, street art pioneer Lee Quinones, author and Lower East Side historian Luc Sante, filmmaker Jim Jarmusch, and other Basquiat associates who appeared in the Boom For Real. 

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Alex Ross Perry On His ‘Very Personal,’ ‘Very Local’ New Film, Golden Exits

Alex Ross Perry (middle) and cinematographer Sean Price Williams (right).

“There’s no one here that we accidentally filmed in one of the crowd scenes, is there?” Alex Ross Perry quipped after a screening of his latest movie– his third to play at BAMcinemaFest over the years. “Because this is the screening where we would have to deal with that.”

Golden Exits is a “very local movie,” the 32-year-old director had noted while introducing the film Saturday night. Unlike Listen Up Philip and Queen of Earth, which were shot partly outside of the city, this one occurs almost entirely in brownstone Brooklyn, not far from BAM— with the notable exception of a scene at Anthology Film Archives in the East Village.

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Bicycle Film Festival Is Going to Be Wheelie Good, According to a Spokes-person

Biking is having a moment. Citi Bike is expanding, Andy Samberg just released his Tour de Pharmacy trailer, and Bicycle Fetish Day is quickly approaching. Which makes it a great time for the Bicycle Film Festival to roll into town. The fest will bring a week of screenings, live performances, exhibitions, and even a new animation program to Anthology Film Archives.

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Four Films to See When You Get Sick of the Sun


Casting Jonbenet

Friday April 28 through Thursday May 4 at The Metrograph: $15

Just as OJ: Made in America took on a sensationalized murder case that became a defining feature of the American cultural landscape thanks to relentless media coverage, Casting Jonbenet looks to the as-yet-unsolved murder of Jonbenet Ramsey. The six-year-old beauty queen who became an international icon and potent symbol of the Great (White) Child Abduction Panic– which you definitely remember if you were a kid growing up in the ’80s and ’90s. If you immediately associate lollipops with stranger danger and trench coats with flashers, then yes, you are a product of the Jonbenet years.

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Week in Film: Find Out If Ghost in the Shell Is a Shadow of Its Former Self, and More


Ghost in the Shell (1996)
Thursday April 13, Saturday April 15, and Sunday April 16 at The Metrograph: $15

No better time to see the original Ghost in the Shell, now that the anime classic has been remade and lost a good chunk of its futuristic/cyborg ambiguity in the process via the casting of a decidedly blonde, white bombshell in the lead. In the remake, Scarlett Johansson plays Major, i.e. an Anglicized version of the already Anglized Cyborg Major Kusanagi from the anime version.

The year is 2029, and this “perfect specimen of human-brained computer engineering” has been tasked with tracking down the elusive and amorphous villain known as The Puppet Master, whose precise plan for overthrowing the world– a Blade Runner-like super-city megalopolis where the human race has become so consumed by technology, that they are now inseparable and, at times, difficult to distinguish. The film deftly navigates the ethical and existential quandaries that are dramatically more real than they were in 1996 when the animated film was made.

Ghost in the Shell (2017)
Thursday April 13 through Thursday April 20 at Nitehawk: $12

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