(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

It’s been three years since the folks at Spoke Art produced an art show dedicated to Wes Anderson, so why not host another? The latest one, which took place over the weekend at Parasol Projects on the Bowery, featured over 100 artists paying homage to the director’s latest, Isle of Dogs.

Why a tribute show now, seven months after the film came out? Well, a behind-the-scenes coffee table book was just published. And it sounds like it’s going to be a while before Anderson’s next one, rumored to be a “musical comedy” set in France. So, why not?

While Anderson himself has been busy curating an exhibit for Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum (its title is as twee as you’d expect: Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and Other Treasures), the folks at Spoke Art have been curating works inspired by the director’s film about a boy named Atari and his attempt to rescue his dog, Spots, from quarantine on Trash Island. At a private preview of the “Isle of Dogs Art Show” on Friday, guests such as writer Jay McInerney and designer-model-actor Waris Ahluwalia, who has appeared in The Life Aquatic and other Anderson movies, mingled amidst dozens of works of tribute art as well as some actual sets used for the stop-motion film.

Among the highlights of the show were a human-sized pilot uniform created by Brooklyn-based painter and textile artist Laura Eliason; a large tapestry of a dog-slaying samurai by Dan Christofferson; a portrait of Oracle the pug, painted onto old hardcovers, by “book sculpture” artist Mike Stilkey; a paper sculpture of Wes Anderson as Fantastic Mr. Fox, with Spots at his side, by paper artist Britni Brault; a puppy in a snow globe by Zoe Williams; and, of course, more than one homage to the film’s blondfro-sporting heroine Tracy Walker. There were screen prints aplenty– everything from ads for Puppy Snaps to reimaginings of the movie poster.

Click through our slideshow to have a look.