Kate Hush (image via Cooler Gallery)

Kate Hush (image via Cooler Gallery)

Female Behavior
Opening Tuesday January 10 at Cooler Gallery, 7 pm to 10 pm. On view through January 31. 

Firstly, let’s discuss this gallery’s name. Sure, it sounds sort of pompous, in a cooler-than-you kind of way, and maybe that’s what they think of themselves. But the origin of this gallery is actually, well, cool. It exists within a “repurposed industrial icebox” in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, so it really is a cooler gallery. Plus, it seeks to display work that involves elements of manufacturing, so it’s aware of its roots. But enough about the gallery, let’s get to the show: artist Kate Hush makes massive sculptures of neon light, and what she is particularly trying to capture in her solo show, Female Behavior, are women and their so-called “wicked ways.” She writes of light being produced when bonds are broken, such as the cutting of a diamond, so she has crafted female silhouettes to portray those who are seen as cruel and conniving simply for being “sharp” or for cutting ties with a man who will then call her crazy. May women burn bright and powerful as much as they can, especially now.

(flyer via Fort Gansevoort)

(flyer via Fort Gansevoort)

New Work
Opening Wednesday January 11 at Fort Gansevoort, 6 pm to 9 pm. On view through February 7. 

Painter Alan Cote has some new work for you at Meatpacking gallery Fort Gansevoort. A lot of it may look very similar, but that’s sort of Cote’s thing. His focus is on color-drenched two-panel works featuring repeating geometric patterns spaced across bright backgrounds with subtle variations in tone or shape. The 1937-born artist spent the first part of his career working in Tribeca and has been exhibiting since 1970, with works in the permanent collections of MoMA, the Whitney, the Guggenheim, and others. This will be an interesting chance to get a closer look at the process of a prolific abstract painter in a smaller, gallery setting, as the New Work show will be an assortment of gouache color studies, 2D drawings, and large-scale paintings.

Jonny Detiger (image via Howl! Happening / Facebook)

Jonny Detiger (image via Howl! Happening / Facebook)

Amplified Space
Opening Thursday January 12 at Howl Happening, 6 pm to 9 pm. On view through February 9. 

Holland-born artist and designer Jonny Detiger has brought a whole new environment into East Village space Howl Happening for this upcoming show, and it’s an environment that appears to be a whole lot brighter and more playful than the state of the world nowadays. The artist has assembled Plexiglas sculptures in a variety of colors to create a room one can walk around in, one that is constantly shifting in color to the point where it could feel like you are submerged in a kaleidoscope. There will be various smaller art pieces placed on and around the Plexiglas, so there will be no shortage of stuff to look at. And maybe even stuff to smell; it’s been said that Detiger’s work engages as many of the five senses as possible. Plus, his work seeks to “explore the human condition of happiness” as well as heighten the feeling, so if you’re having a bad day, pop on over to East 1st Street for a smile or two.

(image via Magdalen Wong / Facebook)

(image via Magdalen Wong / Facebook)

House Work
Opening Friday January 13 at 437 Pulaski Street, 7 pm to 9 pm. 

Office space can be expensive, and even coworking spaces can seem unaffordable. I mean, is the notion of free coffee really worth the price tag? So, many people elect to work from home. Artist Alison Owen has interpreted this in a rather unique way, in that she takes homes and other domestic spaces and works to turn them into art pieces. This is accomplished via selecting aspects of these spaces that seem mundane or disregarded and adding special touches to them, whether it be highlighting the shadows that play across the wall with outlines of string and tape, or creating new textures on familiar surfaces. This, the artist hopes, will encourage individuals look differently at the places they exist regularly in. At the opening reception, there will be an additional performance by multimedia artist Sarah Dittrich, who will “turn elements of the living space into a musical instrument activated by viewers’s movement through the space.”