(by David Shama, via Con Artist / Facebook)

(by David Shama, via Con Artist / Facebook)

Supernatural
Opening Wednesday January 25 at Con Artist Collective, 7 pm to 11 pm. On view through January 27.

Inspired by the popularity of Netflix’s Stranger Things and other popular culture in genres that like to bring on the chills, Con Artist Collective’s Supernatural exhibition is a quick weeklong endeavor showcasing all things that go bump in the night. So, you’ll bear witness to ghosts, werewolves, demons, vampires, and other otherworldly creatures, but this won’t only be literal manifestations of the theme. Some artists will choose a more metaphorical path, rendering feelings of fear, suspense, or uncertainty through color, shape, or something else entirely. Boo!

(image via BGSQD)

(image via BGSQD)

Love Positive Women
Opening Thursday January 26 at Bureau of General Services – Queer Division, 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm. On view through January 29.

This pop-up exhibition honors women living with HIV, consisting of dozens of handmade paper valentines created by artists, activists, and other HIV+ women containing messages of support and love. Love Positive Women was established by Visual AIDS member Jessica Whitbread in 2013, and has become an international grassroots initiative centered around the simple and individual act of sending a card to a vulnerable stranger and how these actions can work toward a greater good. Some of the artists who have created valentines on view for Love Positive Women 2017‘s pop-up include award-winning poet and actress Pamela Sneed, visual artist Chitra Ganesh, painter and writer Carrie Moyer, artist and AIDS activist Marlene McCarty, and many more. After the exhibition, the valentines will be mailed directly to positive women around the world, with the intent that they arrive in time for Valentine’s Day, “in the hopes of lessening the stigma experienced by women living with HIV.”

Quantum Wall, II (Missing Matter), 2016 Acrylic on canvas 121.9 x 243.8 x 7.6 cm / 48 x 96 x 3 in © Jack Whitten Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

Quantum Wall, II (Missing Matter), 2016
Acrylic on canvas
121.9 x 243.8 x 7.6 cm / 48 x 96 x 3 in
© Jack Whitten
Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

Jack Whitten
Opening Thursday January 26 at Hauser & Wirth 22nd Street, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through April 7.

This solo show is all about American abstract artist Jack Whitten and his dark, highly textured creations. Though Whitten has been making work since the 1960s, this show will center on his newest body of work, created from 2015 to as recently as 2017, including pieces from a project “honoring African-American visionaries.” Whitten works primarily in painting, but takes a unique approach in that he treats the paint almost as a sculptor would, using its thickness to form shapes and ribbons on canvas. His aesthetic can appear less like classic abstraction and more like renditions of futuristic technology at work or snapshots of outer space, as he holds a penchant for astrophysics and investigating “thought experiments” through the act of painting. This has resulted in works that look pixelated, resemble black holes, or create other worlds entirely, whether this be though intricate tessellation or bold, vast smudges.

Still from ‘Stuntwoman’ by Alma Alloro, 2016, Edition of 3 + 1AP (via TRANSFER)

Still from ‘Stuntwoman’ by Alma Alloro, 2016, Edition of 3 + 1AP (via TRANSFER)

Big Screen
Opening Saturday January 28 at TRANSFER, 6 pm to 10 pm. On view through March 4.

Berlin-based, Israel-born artist Alma Alloro works in the curious intersection of “craft and animation,” utilizing handcrafted methods such as quilting to create the feeling and story of digital storytelling and “animated abstract films.” Only, Alloro isn’t using any “new technology” component in her work. It’s all handcrafted from fabrics and similar materials, yet still tied to the field of digital graphics and onscreen works. Quilts, Alloro says, usually tell stories, both through their patchwork makeup and through the labor used to create them. These creations do so as well, only this time they also serve as platforms for “the moving image” and its history, as each section of the quilt nods to the classic 4:3 aspect ratio, and creates a narrative within itself as it moves from black and white to color and beyond.