Mike Taylor (image via Idio Gallery)

Mike Taylor (image via Idio Gallery)

Mike Taylor: Condensed Flesh
Opening Thursday October 13 at Idio Gallery, 6 pm to 11 pm. On view through October 30.

East Williamsburg space Idio Gallery put out a call for crowdsourced financial support several months ago, which very well could have signaled that it was beginning to scale down. However, with a show at Bushwick Open Studios and another show opening shortly after, they don’t appear to be going anywhere. This one is a solo show, presenting works on paper and paintings by renowned graphic artist Mike Taylor, created between 2012 and now. Finished works won’t be the only thing on display in this show, as Idio’s downstairs basement space will be transformed into a showcase of the artist in-process, with drawings not yet done, prints, and “printmaking debris” on view as well. Taylor’s work is bold and bright, often utilizing neon colors and mixing abstract patterns with notes of realism and the human form filtered through the style of the illustrator and comic artist.

Anita Steckel, Anita of New York Meets Tom of Finland, 2005, Mixed media on book pages. Courtesy Estate of Anita Steckel and the Suzanne Geiss Company, New York.

Anita Steckel, Anita of New York Meets Tom of Finland, 2005, Mixed media on book pages. Courtesy Estate of Anita Steckel and the Suzanne Geiss Company, New York.

Cut Ups: Queer Collage Practices
Opening Friday October 14 at the Leslie-Lohman Museum, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through December 18.

Collage occupies a unique place in the art world. For one, it’s relatively easy to do, and can be associated with amateurs and young teens combing through magazines with scissors in their free time. On the other hand, artists working in collage have found their rightful place in the artistic canon (collage has origins in the Victorian Era and perhaps even earlier), and notables like Kurt Schwitters, Pablo Picasso, and even Kara Walker have made the medium their own. “Queer Collage Practices” explores this medium through a queer lens, showcasing various techniques in collage and scrapbooking and how 14 queer artists use them. Some display old-school feminist critiques of the patriarchy, other combine embroidery, and there are even several anonymous collections that err on the more titillating side, involving BDSM imagery or gay male pornography mixed with interior design. The show is, in a way, a collage in itself, placing works of various histories and tones side-by-side. This exhibit is a “re-presentation” of the exhibit “Cock, Paper, Scissors” which opened at the USC Libraries’s ONE Archives this past April.

Jinsu Han The Action Paintings (Oct 14–Dec 11, 2016) 2016 Motor, Brush, Canvas, Paint, Wood Site-specific Installation

Jinsu Han
The Action Paintings
2016
Motor, Brush, Canvas, Paint, Wood
Site-specific Installation

The Apotheosis of the Fish Market
Opening Friday October 14 at 284 Grand Street, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through December 4. 

For this pop-up exhibition by Marc Straus Gallery and its director Ken Tan, a 19th-century building that once housed a fish market now serves as a home for the work of two Korean artists, Jong Oh and Jinsu Han. The fish market, operated by a Chinese family, left the building two years ago and the spot will be constructed into a new building in the spring, as is seemingly inevitable these days. In the meantime, the building in its transitional state is used as a home for artwork, in a gesture that recalls trends towards unconventional DIY art spaces utilized out of necessity. The piece of writing that may have started this trend, Nancy Foote’s 1976 Artforum cover story “The Apotheosis of the Crummy Space,” noted a “disaster area ambiance” in some of the old buildings used by artists. Han’s contribution to the show repurposes “junk” items found in the space to create site-specific installations such as a brush that endlessly paints one spot. Meanwhile, Oh’s work takes a more minimalist approach that still acknowledges the industrial nature of the space, creating impressively sparse pieces from material like string, Plexiglas, and metal.

art by PervvyPanda (image via Fatter IRL / Facebook)

art by PervvyPanda (image via Fatter IRL / Facebook)

Fatter IRL
Opening Saturday October 15 at 630 Flushing Avenue (5th Floor), 6 pm to 10 pm. On view through November 5.

A fittingly large group show presents and celebrates the work of ten artists who self-identify as fat/chubby. Many of these artists are also queer, gender non-conforming, or artists of color, making it even more radical by society’s standards for these particular bodies to be lifted up and for their creations to be presented in a gallery setting, an institution that has often only welcomed the elite, which can often be code for white/cis/able-bodied/male. Much of the art in the show also depicts fat, femme, queer bodies, whether this be as photography, self-portraits, drawings, sculpture, or pornography, and the opening features a performance by Laura Marie Marciano as well as an in-person appearance by online celeb and plus-size model La’Shaunae Steward. “Fatter IRL,” curated by Annie Rose, is part of “RE:,” an art show spearheaded by Erin Davis and Max C. Lee that seeks to redefine and challenge what formal art exhibitions can be.