Don Hill. (Photo: Patrick McMullan)

Don Hill. (Photo: Patrick McMullan)

There are more signs of life at the onetime home of Don Hill’s. No, it isn’t being zombified CBGBs-style. Rather, the club’s soon-to-open replacement, The Hills, will host a tribute to Don himself, featuring Michael C. Hall and other cast members of Hedwig and the Angry Inch, which got its start at the rowdy rock-and-rave dive of yore.

You’ll recall that a month after Hill died in March of 2011, Paul Sevigny and Nur Kahn were forced to close the club they had taken over from the beloved booker. Now a new operator — described by a rep as “a team that came out of the old Don Hill’s” [update: we chatted with creative director Alma Ayala and she says there’s no connection to the old place] — is set to revive 511 Greenwich Street sometime early next year with plans to “carry on Don’s vision of a performance venue.” And if you doubt that: on Sunday, Stephen Trask, the composer and lyricist of Hedwig, is returning to the spot where he and John Cameron Mitchell worked out early versions of the musical as part of the drag-tastic Squeezebox parties.

Among those who’ll join Trask and Tits of Clay (the band that plays the Angry Inch on Broadway) in the night of Hedwig-appropriate punk and glam songs (think Lou Reed and David Bowie covers) are Michael C. Hall, who’s currently playing Hedwig on Broadway; frontwoman of The Deafening, Lena Hall, who’s currently playing Yitzhak; rock royalty David “Buster Poindexter” Johansen of the New York Dolls and Fred Schneider of The B52s; and Miriam Shor, who was the original Yitzhak. We hear at least one B52s song is in the mix, so pray for (or against?) “Love Shack.” (Incidentally, Kate Pierson of the B52s, who has a new album coming out in February, just dropped a new video featuring Fred Armisen in semi-drag.)

At $75, ain’t cheap, but, hey, it’s an excuse to get a taste of Hedwig without having to set foot in Times Square. And come on, you’re partying with Dexter and you can rest assured the money is going to Road Recovery, a non-profit that helps young people battle the sort of harrowing addictions that played out on a nightly basis in the godforsaken bathrooms of Don Hill’s.