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Amber Maykut, an artist in residence at Morbid Anatomy, is both a taxidermist and collector of stuffed creatures. She first began collecting butterflies in high school. (Photo: Nicole Disser) (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Last night Williamsburg’s City Reliquary teamed up with the Brooklyn Historical Society for Collector’s Night 2014, held at the latter’s home base in Downtown Brooklyn.

The event brought together eccentric collectors, obsessives, and borderline (though we assure you, harmless) hoarders together for a fundraising effort to benefit the two organizations. The collections on display provided a window into the personal lives of their owners. Each pack rat had a handful of fascinating stories about how they started collecting, why they continue to do it, and their intimate connection to the multitude of objects they share their limited New York City space with.

If you missed it, don’t fret. We’ve got you covered with the slideshow below. Click through to see some of the weirdest finds from Collector’s Night.

Guests crammed in to the Brooklyn Historical Society to ogle to the collections. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Guests crammed in to the Brooklyn Historical Society to ogle to the collections. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Heather McCabe's collection of Amex Promo Credit Cards. She says she's been amassing them for over five years. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Heather McCabe's collection of Amex Promo Credit Cards. She says she's been amassing them for over five years. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

McCabe also collects Cockroach legs.

McCabe also collects Cockroach legs. "I wanted to prove to my landlord I had a cockroach problem," she explained. "I want it to get bigger, but I also don't." (Photo: Nicole Disser)

A variety of Pez dispensers from Felix and Henry's Canadian Pez Museum. Jason Mclean started the collection which also includes autographed Pez dispensers. He explained that Jerry Seinfeld is one of the only celebrities who's ever refused to sign one. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

A variety of Pez dispensers from Felix and Henry's Canadian Pez Museum. Jason Mclean started the collection which also includes autographed Pez dispensers. He explained that Jerry Seinfeld is one of the only celebrities who's ever refused to sign one. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

From left: Jason Mclean and Felix Mclean. Father and son are originally from London, Ontario and have recently relocated to New York City by way of LA. When asked why the museum retains its

From left: Jason Mclean and Felix Mclean. Father and son are originally from London, Ontario and have recently relocated to New York City by way of LA. When asked why the museum retains its "Canadian" moniker, Jason explained: "Because you never forget where you're from." (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Marion Duckworth Smith with her collection of chalkware from the 1930s and 40s. We originally mistook them for yard ornaments, but Smith was quick to correct us.

Marion Duckworth Smith with her collection of chalkware from the 1930s and 40s. We originally mistook them for yard ornaments, but Smith was quick to correct us. "They're prizes," she explained. "Well, not anymore, but they used to be. You could win them at Coney Island." (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Arthur Vint shows off his western wear collection, which included an impressive array of bolo ties.

Arthur Vint shows off his western wear collection, which included an impressive array of bolo ties. "It's a living collection," Vint, who hails from Tuscon, Arizona, explained. "I wear this stuff every day." He admitted the display probably only accounted for an eighth of his closet. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Mark Splatter has an extensive collection of oddities: measuring instruments, taxidermy wet specimens, and various other anatomy related items. Splatter showed us a wet specimen he made himself, a jar full of mice he'd found in his apartment. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Mark Splatter has an extensive collection of oddities: measuring instruments, taxidermy wet specimens, and various other anatomy related items. Splatter showed us a wet specimen he made himself, a jar full of mice he'd found in his apartment. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

A Greek funeral banner–

A Greek funeral banner– "for some fellow named Petros," Splatter explained. The collection on display accounted for only a small portion of Splatter's collection. "The snakes were too heavy to bring," he explained. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

A dizzying assortment of Presidential buttons from the collection of Jon Cruz. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

A dizzying assortment of Presidential buttons from the collection of Jon Cruz. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

When asked to point out his wackiest collectible, Cruz immediately gestured toward a large pin that read,

When asked to point out his wackiest collectible, Cruz immediately gestured toward a large pin that read, "Sorry Nik, I Like Dick." Cruz admitted it was hard to believe this pin is authentic. It represents the Nixon campaign message of being tough on communism, and "Nik" is a reference to Nikita Khrushchev. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Though disco shirts are his true passion, Kyle Supley decided to bring his more manageable tie hoard to Collector's Night. Supley said he owns approximately 400 to 500 ties.

Though disco shirts are his true passion, Kyle Supley decided to bring his more manageable tie hoard to Collector's Night. Supley said he owns approximately 400 to 500 ties. "I try to wear them all," he explained. "But I'm an art teacher." Supley's disco shirt collection, totaling 600, eclipses his tie stash. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

More political ephemera from Jon Cruz's collection. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

More political ephemera from Jon Cruz's collection. (Photo: Nicole Disser)