Introducing a new column in which we give a stylish local somewhere to go, so they can get all Dressed Up.

Annette arrives at Dusty Buttons.

Annette arrives at Dusty Buttons.

Dusty Buttons owner Amanda Loureiro measures Annette's waistline before she goes into the dressing room.

Dusty Buttons owner Amanda Loureiro measures Annette's waistline before she goes into the dressing room.

“I’m one of those people that has to look at everything before I make a decision,” says Annette.

“I’m one of those people that has to look at everything before I make a decision,” says Annette.

Other customers pop in and out while Annette shops. A woman with her long hair up in two chopstick buns, who had to text a photo to her “sugar daddy” before buying a dress she liked, complained to us about the size of her hips: “They’re good for sex, bad for standard dress sizes.”

Other customers pop in and out while Annette shops. A woman with her long hair up in two chopstick buns, who had to text a photo to her “sugar daddy” before buying a dress she liked, complained to us about the size of her hips: “They’re good for sex, bad for standard dress sizes.”

Annette leaves the dressing room and assesses her chosen dress, a 1940s-era fit-and-flare ankle dress with tailored buttons that Amanda procured from “the personal collection of a New York vintage maven.”

Annette leaves the dressing room and assesses her chosen dress, a 1940s-era fit-and-flare ankle dress with tailored buttons that Amanda procured from “the personal collection of a New York vintage maven.”

“I wear a lot of black – black and gold are my two favorite colors, and I love polka dots, so it’s perfect,” she says.

“I wear a lot of black – black and gold are my two favorite colors, and I love polka dots, so it’s perfect,” she says. "The skirt especially reminded me of a dress my grandmother used to wear.”

Annette passes over the '50s-era bustier top and matching circle skirt in the front window display, which looks like a Valentine-themed flamenco costume, but relentlessly helpful Amanda encourages her to try it on anyway.  “I feel like Lolita,” she says.

Annette passes over the '50s-era bustier top and matching circle skirt in the front window display, which looks like a Valentine-themed flamenco costume, but relentlessly helpful Amanda encourages her to try it on anyway. “I feel like Lolita,” she says.

“It’s a good thing it’s not 100 degrees out today, or you’d have to cut me out of this,” Annette yells from the dressing room. “Oh, I’ve had to cut a girl out of a dress before,” says Amanda.

“It’s a good thing it’s not 100 degrees out today, or you’d have to cut me out of this,” Annette yells from the dressing room. “Oh, I’ve had to cut a girl out of a dress before,” says Amanda. "It's just seams and threads, nothing to worry about."

Annette tries on the same strappy peeptoes in red and navy, but decides on this pair because “I just love gold so much.” They’re not vintage, but were designed by Eric Michael and shipped from Spain.

Annette tries on the same strappy peeptoes in red and navy, but decides on this pair because “I just love gold so much.” They’re not vintage, but were designed by Eric Michael and shipped from Spain.

Annette completes her outfit with a 1950s clutch that Amanda found at an estate auction. It’s reversible, with gold brocade on one side and black velvet on the other, with a gold clasp. Annette keeps the brocade side out. “The velvet is a nice little secret,” she says.

Annette completes her outfit with a 1950s clutch that Amanda found at an estate auction. It’s reversible, with gold brocade on one side and black velvet on the other, with a gold clasp. Annette keeps the brocade side out. “The velvet is a nice little secret,” she says.

Annette's two-tone final look includes the first dress she pulled off the rack, the luxurious clutch, and gold heels.

Annette's two-tone final look includes the first dress she pulled off the rack, the luxurious clutch, and gold heels.

Annette Ramos’s career as a stylist at Vice spans eight years, and started shortly after she graduated from high school on the Upper West Side (“they raised me,” she said, of the magazine). She lives in the East Village now, two blocks from Dusty Buttons — the boutique we chose for this first installment of All Dressed Up. She met us outside of the East Ninth Street shop wearing chunky high-heeled combat boots and an acid-washed denim jacket sprayed with silver paint — a look she described rather inaccurately as tomboy.

Dusty Buttons is a chronicle of the 20th century in vintage dresses, with an emphasis on the ’40s and ’50s. The racks are surrounded by decades-old knickknacks, and the four-year-old store also offers several lines of new European shoes, new fair trade dresses by American designers, and a sprinkling of vintage accessories, like diamond necklaces and an electric blue fascinator veil that no one would wear on a regular day, although somebody really should.

The local boutiques Ramos haunts most often are all high-end vintage: Williamsburg’s Bird, designer thrift shop Tokio 7, and What Goes Around Comes Around, one of the few vintage spots in Soho. Her favorite designer is John Galliano (“He’s still brilliant,” she said. “Everybody says stupid shit sometimes”). Click through the slideshow to see what went down when she stepped into Dusty Buttons.

All photos by Scott Lynch.