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Floating Food Forest Will Dock at Brooklyn Army Terminal This Summer

Image courtesy of Swale

If you’d prefer to forage for food on a converted barge rather than wait in one more hellish line at Trader Joe’s, you’re in luck: Swale, the floating food forest founded by Mary Mattingly, will land at the Brooklyn Army Terminal in Sunset Park this summer from May through July.

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Bell House Brings Summer Concert and Comedy Series to Industry City: Guided By Voices, Luna, and More

After getting a courtyard tugboat bar from the Frying Pan last year, Sunset Park work-play complex Industry City is upgrading with an outdoor bar from the folks behind two of Brooklyn’s hippest venues, The Bell House and Union Hall. The so-called Bell House Outpost will launch June 1 and will be open Wednesday through Sunday through the summer. What’s more, a new Bell House Summer Series will bring performances by indie darlings Guided By Voices, Luna, and lots more.

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#StopSESTA, Lobotomies, and More Performance Picks

THURSDAY

(poster by Mikey Heller)

Tim Platt: Live in COWncert
Thursday, April 26 at The Brick, 9:30 pm: $10

Many of us grew up watching Sesame Street. Comedian Tim Platt has recently written a song for this beloved children’s show, but that isn’t the only song he’s penned. In fact, you can see Platt’s entire repertoire of comedy music on Thursday night at The Brick when he plays a concert as part of the Brooklyn Comedy Collective’s residence at the Williamsburg theater. Sure, comedy music can be grating or cringe-inducing, but Tim’s music is neither of those things. Well, unless it’s trying to be. So, come one come all, and open your ears for songs about vegetables (as someone who once wrote an entire play about broccoli, this excites me) and all other sorts of topics, with accompanist Ben Kling and opening act Eudora Peterson. Maybe, just maybe, there will also be a cow. Keep Reading »

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Stephen Malkmus and Kim Gordon Team Up For a Country Song About Infidelity

Pavement frontman Stephen Malkmus just released a new one from his forthcoming album with The Jicks, out May 18. “Refute,” a duet with Kim Gordon, is a country ditty about infidelity. But rather than being the victim of it, as she notoriously was in her marriage with Sonic Youth bandmate Thurston Moore, Gordon narrates the role of “a woman who dared to fall head first for her young au pair.” Malkmus, meanwhile, sings about a “man who dared to fall head over heels for a woman” even though “the world was telling him love is dead.”

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Clint Michigan On Making His New Album With Members of The Moldy Peaches and Julie Ruin

Clint Michigan. Photo by Allison Michael Orenstein

Clint Asay has a chipper demeanor, as you’d expect from a former cocktail waiter at Sidewalk Cafe and bartender at Metropolitan. But he also records heart-heavy, semi-biographical folk as Clint Michigan, which is why I recently found him telling me, with a self-deprecating laugh, “I don’t want anyone to feel sorry for me.”

Centuries, Clint Michigan’s second album for Kiam Records and first proper record in nine years, revisits a very specific segment of Asay’s history, when a struggle to stay clean stalled his creativity. The album’s very existence is a victory against those roadblocks, even if he doesn’t believe they’re entirely behind him: he cites his unwavering perfectionism in the studio, minor bouts of stage fright and, at one point, questions the idea of calling himself a musician, believing he lacks some virtuoso quality all artists must possess. But Centuries fashions a success for itself on two of Asay’s foundational strengths as a songmaker: the clarity of his bleak lyrical reveries and his arrangement of collaborators, which includes members of Julie Ruin and The Moldy Peaches.

Ahead of his album release show at Union Pool on April 29, Asay spoke to Bedford + Bowery about his roots in comedy music, his friendship with Quelle Chris, and walking the fine line between writing honest songs and self-obsession.

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The Last Art Show at Silent Barn Is an Education in Skincare

(image courtesy of Disclaimer Gallery)

If you’re even slightly interested in skincare, it would be hard to ignore the current popularity of K-beauty, or Korean cosmetics and skincare products such as sheet masks, serums, and snail-slime face creams. Many of these products contain lactic acid, an organic compound that’s also used in fermentation and produced by the body. For her solo show at Silent Barn’s Disclaimer Gallery, artist Tiffany Jaeyeon Shin has delved into this multi-use microbe both figuratively and literally, investigating its presence in beauty, bodies, and Korean identity by making her own lactic acid skincare products. Keep Reading »

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Ahoy! Some of New York’s Boat Bars Are Back on the Waters

(Photo: grandbanksnyc on Instagram)

We had a hell of a winter, and now it’s going to be a hull of a spring. That’s because two of our favorite floating bars, the Frying Pan and the Grand Banks, have opened for the season.

The folks at the Frying Pan recently shared an old photo taken many years ago, before the former lightship was pulled out of the water and rehabbed. As of this past weekend, she’s back in service at Pier 66 Maritime, at West 26th St and the West Side Highway, and open from noon to sunset on Memorial Day. You can expect the usual long lines after work and on the weekends; photos from the opening weekend festivities show a packed ship o’ fools.

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A Cartoonist Charged With Obscenity and More Art This Week

(flyer via Checks Cashed / Facebook)

Neu Show
Opening Thursday, April 26 at The Living Gallery, 7 pm to 11 pm. One night only.

Sometimes you want to go to a Chelsea gallery to silently stare at art alongside a bunch of people who probably have more money than you, and sometimes you want to stay in Bushwick and see some art while a local trans punk band plays. You can do the latter on Thursday at The Living Gallery (which just celebrated its sixth anniversary) at Neu Show, a showcase of nine local underground photographers, painters, experimental mixed-media artists, graphic artists, and more, with live tunes from local punk outfit Library and tracks from DJ Drew Redmond to keep the mood nice and energized. There is a $5 cover at the door, but the show is a mere one night only, and these artists need to be supported somehow. Keep Reading »

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This Man Will Iron Your Spring Wardrobe For Free at a Brooklyn Bar Tonight

“Iron Man” Jeremy Hook.

He… is… Iron Man. And he’s coming to a Greenpoint bar tonight.

James Hook, the Greenpoint resident who’s gotten a ton of press by pressing clothing, is bringing his Brooklyn Ironers’ Union, Local 278, to Troost Cafe tonight from 9pm to midnight. So gather up the spring outfits that’ve been pathetically packed into a tupperware container all winter and get them lovingly smoothed over for free.

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Meryl Meisler’s New Exhibition Captures the Diversity of the LES in the ’70s, ’80s

“Ring Toss at The Lower East Side Street Festival, NY, NY June 1978” (Photo Meryl Meisler / Courtesy of The Storefront Project & Stephen Kasher Gallery

Meryl Meisler, the New York-based photographer known for her images of the city in the ’70s and ’80s, will show previously unseen photos of the Lower East Side during those years in an upcoming exhibition. Opening May 3 at The Storefront Project, “LES YES!” focuses on the rich cultural history of the neighborhood and takes an unflinching look at the daily lives of the working-class people and immigrants who lived there.

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Donald Trump Was Inevitably Compared to Tony Montana at the Scarface Reunion

(Photo: Tribeca Film Festival on Instagram)

After the 35th anniversary screening of Scarface at Beacon Theatre last night, director Brian De Palma told the packed house why he decided to remake the 1932 film: “I’ve always been interested in making movies about people that start rather humbly and then acquire a great deal of power and then ultimately isolate themselves and sort of live in their own world. Could that be anything we’re experiencing now?”

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Juno Director Jason Reitman Tackles the ‘Very Taboo’ Subject of Parenting in Tully

(l to r.) Mackenzie Davis and Charlize Theron in Jason Reitman’s Tully. (Courtesy of Focus Features)

Eleven years after his zany teen pregnancy screwball — a little film called Juno — Jason Reitman is back with a new kind of motherhood comedy. Tully may be less indie-music-infused than its Ellen Page-starring forerunner, but don’t be fooled: this isn’t one of those broad parenting comedies like Mr. Mom, although Reitman wouldn’t be mad if it was.

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